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James Booth Papers

James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) was Melter & Refiner at the United States Mint in Philadelphia. The James Booth papers are held by the Science History Institute in Philadelphia and the numismatic portions are presented here, courtesy of Science History Institute. Newman Numismatic Portal sponsored the digitization of this material in 2021.

 

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20 entries found for [year:1886]

    Page 1 of 1
    Letter from Emil Brusewitz to James Curtis Booth 1/15/1886

    Letter from Emil Brusewitz to James Curtis Booth

    Emil Brusewitz, a Swedish smelter, writes to James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) to discuss smelting techniques. Brusewitz thanks Booth for A History of the United States Mint and sends him a photograph of the Swedish royal palace as a gift. Photograph is not included in this collection.

    Letter from A. L. Snowden to James Curtis Booth, March 26, 1886 3/26/1886

    Letter from A. L. Snowden to James Curtis Booth, March 26, 1886

    Letter from Archibald Loudon Snowden (1835-1912) Superintendent of the United States Mint at Philadelphia from 1879 to 1885, to James Curtis Booth (1810-1888), confirming the receipt of payment for three unaccounted for silver bars, valued at $1936 USD.

    Receipt for bullion received by A.L. Snowden from James C. Booth 3/26/1886
    Letter from H.E. Spackman to James Curtis Booth, March 30, 1886 3/30/1886

    Letter from H.E. Spackman to James Curtis Booth, March 30, 1886

    H. E. Spackman of the United States Treasury writes to James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) to question whether Booth intends to request special appropriation to cover the matter of three stolen bars.

    Letter from James P. Kimball to James Curtis Booth, April 2, 1886 4/2/1886

    Letter from James P. Kimball to James Curtis Booth, April 2, 1886

    James P. Kimball (1836-1913), metallurgist and geologist and Director of the United States Mint from 1885-1889, asks the amount James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) has paid for silver to replace two stolen bars of silver.

    Note from H.E. Spackman to James Curtis Booth, April 14, 1886 4/14/1886

    Note from H.E. Spackman to James Curtis Booth, April 14, 1886

    Letter from H. E. Spackman of the United States Treasury to James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) enclosing a copy of a letter from Charles O'Neill (1821-1893) member of the U.S. House of Representatives. O'Neill's letter was written in reply to James P. Kimball's (1836-1913) communication pertaining to a bill for Booth's relief.

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, April 26, 1886 4/26/1886

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, April 26, 1886

    John Wesley Powell (1834-1902), first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and director of the U.S. Geological Survey, writes to James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) to express his concern at Booth's delay in sending a promised geological survey of Delaware.

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to George H. Cook 4/26/1886

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to George H. Cook

    James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) requests New Jersey Geological Survey maps from George H. Cook (1818-1889), state geologist of New Jersey and vice president of Rutgers College.

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, April 30, 1886 4/30/1886

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, April 30, 1886

    John Wesley Powell (1834-1902), first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and director of the U.S. Geological Survey, writes to assure James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) that his delay in sending a geological survey report was not the only one encountered. Powell informs Booth that there will be no need for an elaboration of Booth's earlier work of 1837-1840.

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to Joseph P. Comegys, May 22, 1886 5/22/1886

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to Joseph P. Comegys, May 22, 1886

    James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) thanks Judge Joseph P. Comegys (1813-1893), an American judge, lawyer, and politician from Dover, Delaware, for sending a copy of the act creating a Geological Survey Commission.

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, June 24, 1886 6/24/1886

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, June 24, 1886

    John Wesley Powell (1834-1902), first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and director of the U.S. Geological Survey, thanks James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) for sending his earlier work and praises its historical value in molding public opinion in regard to the development of natural resources.

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, June 30, 1886 6/30/1886

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, June 30, 1886

    John Wesley Powell (1834-1902), first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and director of the U.S. Geological Survey, writes to inform James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) that he may complete his sketch at his convenience.

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, July 13, 1886 7/13/1886

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, July 13, 1886

    John Wesley Powell (1834-1902), first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and director of the U.S. Geological Survey, thanks James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) for sending his "elaborate sketch" of Booth's geological survey of Delaware.

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, July 15, 1886 7/15/1886

    Letter from John Wesley Powell to James Curtis Booth, July 15, 1886

    John Wesley Powell (1834-1902), first director of the Bureau of Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and director of the U.S. Geological Survey, thanks James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) for unspecified supplemental materials.

    Letter from James P. Kimball to James Curtis Booth, July 23, 1886 7/23/1886

    Letter from James P. Kimball to James Curtis Booth, July 23, 1886

    James P. Kimball (1836-1913), metallurgist and geologist and Director of the United States Mint from 1885-1889, requests James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) forward his article as quickly as possible.

    Letter from Daniel M. Fox to James Curtis Booth, July 27, 1886 7/27/1886

    Letter from Daniel M. Fox to James Curtis Booth, July 27, 1886

    Daniel M. Fox (1819-1890), Superintendent of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, writes again to James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) following his letter of December 15, to enquire on the states of Booth's health and his slow recovery.

    Letter from F. C. Garrigues to Alex Muckle 8/24/1886

    Letter from F. C. Garrigues to Alex Muckle

    F. C. Garrigues, James Curtis Booth's (1810-1888) foreman at the United States Mint, writes to Alex Muckle that Booth is still too ill to return to his work at the Mint; Garrigues mentions Booth's illness and expresses the hope that he is recovering.

    Note on the consistency of nickel cents 9/30/1886

    Note on the consistency of nickel cents

    Description of the production of nickels utilizing nickel and copper.

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to Daniel M. Fox, October 8, 1886 10/8/1886

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to Daniel M. Fox, October 8, 1886

    James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) sends a report on refining to Daniel M. Fox (1819-1890), Superintendent of the United States Mint at Philadelphia from 1885-1890.

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to Daniel M. Fox, October 20, 1886 10/20/1886

    Letter from James Curtis Booth to Daniel M. Fox, October 20, 1886

    James Curtis Booth (1810-1888) writes to Daniel M. Fox (1819-1890), Superintendent of the United States Mint at Philadelphia from 1885-1890, explaining in reply to "Handy & Harman, N.Y." the conditions by which silver bars are rejected.

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