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Stewart, Frank

Born in New Jersey. Stewart owned the Frank H. Stewart Electric Co. They bought the property that was site of the first U. S. Mint in Philadelphia. Stewart attempted to have the building preserved. He offered the building or the materials from the building free to any organization that would preserve the building on public land. Ultimately the building was demolished in 1911. Stewart preserved some artifacts from the building and wrote of its history. He served as president of the Gloucester County Historical Society.

Stewart commissioned Edwin Lamasure to paint "Ye Olde Mint" based on drawings and measurements taken prior to demolition. No painting or print could be found showing the original building from the time the mint was in operation. Stewart also commissioned "Presenting the First Coins" by John Ward Dunsmore in 1914.

Author of History of the First United States Mint, Its People and Its Operations in 1924. Five hundred copies were offered at $5.00 each. It was reprinted in 1974. Author of a biography of Mark Newby in 1947. Stewart also contributed articles on mint history to The Numismatist. He died in a hospital in Camden, New Jersey.

obit: NUM 61 Dec 1948 page 864; see: The Secret History of the First U.S. Mint.

 



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    Ye Olde Mint: Being a brief description of the first U.S. Mint, established by Congress in the year 1792, at Seventh Street and Sugar Alley (now Filbert Street) Philadelphia

    Frank H. Stewart's "prequel" to History of the First United States Mint, this pamphlet summarizes Stewart's knowledge of the first U.S. Mint as of the publication date.

    Our New Home and Old Times 1913

    Our New Home and Old Times

    Frank H. Stewart's account of his new building erected at the former site of the first United States Mint.

    History of the First United States Mint: Its People and Its Operations 1924

    History of the First United States Mint: Its People and Its Operations

    Frank H. Stewart's study of the first United States Mint, the building he purchased, razed, and ultimately commemorated through a collection now at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, and this volume.

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