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    Cherry pickers

    N.O.W. News, Spring 2000

    1/4/2000

    Highlight: commercial cherry pickerse was a natural spin-off and “simplifier” for dealing with the immi- grant language barrier. In the bigger orchard operations, a company store was established, migrant housing was provided, and an orderly if not completely fair eco- nomic system implemented. Token coinage held the worker’s money captive. The migrant force returned each year, and several generations of Jamaican cherry pickers toiled in

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    Calcoin News, vol. 50, no. 3

    1/9/1996

    Highlight: Cherry pickers ' News The newsfetter for all variety specialists Cherry pickers' News from J.T. Stanton is a bi-monthly newsletter devoted to the variety specialist. The 8-1 /2”x 1 1” page format allows for full size photos of exciting new finds, new research, and an up-to-date price guide section. For your subscription, send $19.95 for six issues to : Cherry pickers' News P.O. Box 15487, Savannah, GA 31416-2178 - 20 -

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    BOOK REVIEW: CHERRYPICKERS GUIDE, FIFTH EDITION, VOLUME II

    01/01/2012

    Highlight: It will also have dealers and collectors who could care less about bullion _ except the changing price _ looking for the die varieties mentioned in this important Cherry Pickers_ Guide. This new Cherry Pickers_ Guide by Fivaz, Stanton and Potter will be one of the best sellers for Whitman Publishing, LLC in 2012. We predict high honors at the next NLG gathering at the ANA - WFOM in Philadelphia in 2012 for this 5th Edition, Volume Two of the Cherry Pickers_ Guide. We highly recommend this guide for any collector, dealer, researcher, scholar or investor. After reading it, we are sure it will stimulate the collecting of die varieties of U. S. Coins and Bullion. For information regarding Cherrypickers_ Guide to Rare Die Varieties, 5th edition, volume II, which was released in November, 2011 b

    John and Nancy Wilson submitted this review of the new Cherrypickers Guide. -Editor Cherrypickers_

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    N.O.W. News, Spring 2000

    1/4/2000

    Highlight: commercial cherry pickerse was a natural spin-off and “simplifier” for dealing with the immi- grant language barrier. In the bigger orchard operations, a company store was established, migrant housing was provided, and an orderly if not completely fair eco- nomic system implemented. Token coinage held the worker’s money captive. The migrant force returned each year, and several generations of Jamaican cherry pickers toiled in

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    Calcoin News, vol. 50, no. 3

    1/9/1996

    Highlight: Cherry pickers ' News The newsfetter for all variety specialists Cherry pickers' News from J.T. Stanton is a bi-monthly newsletter devoted to the variety specialist. The 8-1 /2”x 1 1” page format allows for full size photos of exciting new finds, new research, and an up-to-date price guide section. For your subscription, send $19.95 for six issues to : Cherry pickers' News P.O. Box 15487, Savannah, GA 31416-2178 - 20 -

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    BOOK REVIEW: CHERRYPICKERS GUIDE, FIFTH EDITION, VOLUME II

    01/01/2012

    Highlight: looking for the die varieties mentioned in this important Cherry Pickers’ Guide.

    This new Cherry Pickers’ Guide by Fivaz, Stanton and Potter will be one of the best sellers for Whitman Publishing, LLC in 2012. We predict high honors at the next NLG gathering at the ANA - WFOM in Philadelphia in 2012 for this 5th Edition, Volume Two of the Cherry Pickers’ Guide. We highly recommend this guide for any collector, dealer, researcher, scholar or investor. After reading it, we are sure it will stimulate the collecting of die varieties of U. S. Coins and Bullion.

    For information regarding Cherrypickers’ Guide to Rare Die Varieties, 5th edition, volume II, which was released in November, 2011 by Whitman Publishing, LLC for $39.95, you can contact Whitman

    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 14, no. 4

    1/12/2003

    Highlight: In the June 1999 issue of “Cherry pickers’ News,” an early die state of the Cherry pickers’ Guide, 3rd ed. variety was shown which had the repunching below the center of the middle of the second 9, but there was no metal below the top of the 9. The photo of this EDS is shown below. The relative date position to the den- ticles was the same. This early die state proved that the metal below the top of the 9 was the result of a die chip which fell away after the obverse die was used in the coining press. With the loop of the 9 being oval-shaped, it would be a logical conclusion that the top edge would be that point which would have the most pres- sure and break first.

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    Calcoin News, vol. 51, no. 1

    1/3/1997

    Highlight: D TO LIFE MEMBERSHIP LM 31-9 Michael M. Stanley LM 1-38 Arthur M. Kagin SUMMARY Membership on November 21 , 1 996 685 New Members, Nov. 21, 1996 through Jan. 30, 1997 39 Reinstated 1 Resigned 2 Convert to Life Membership 2 Membership total as of January 30, 1997 723 Total Individual Life Members 120 Total Club Life Members 1 1 Cherrypickers ’ News The newsletter for all variety specialists Cherry pickersThe 8.5 x 11 inch page format allows for full size photos of exciting new finds, new research, and an up-to-date price guide section. For your subscription, send $19.95 for six issues to : Cherry pickers' News P.0. Box 15487, Savannah, GA 31416-2178 - 35 -

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 2 (203)

    15/3/2001

    Highlight: Cherry pickers use their knowledge and skill to first identify a rarer variety, and then acquire the coin. The topic of cherry picking involves ethics and is somewhat controversial. More on that on that topic in a future Talking Beginners. The fact is if you know what to look for, you increase your ehances of finding it. If you learn to recognize rarer varieties at a glance (hopefully by a single marker), you can eliminate a lot of “common” coins quickly. Cherry picking columns like this have appeared for specific early date large cents in earlier Penny Wise issues. This time let’s look at some cherry picking short cuts for a few middle date large cents. Before I begin, I would like to stress that these short cuts will not work on some coins, which have been damaged or were not struck

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 14, no. 4

    1/12/2003

    Highlight: In the June 1999 issue of “Cherry pickers’ News,” an early die state of the Cherry pickers’ Guide, 3rd ed. variety was shown which had the repunching below the center of the middle of the second 9, but there was no metal below the top of the 9. The photo of this EDS is shown below. The relative date position to the den- ticles was the same. This early die state proved that the metal below the top of the 9 was the result of a die chip which fell away after the obverse die was used in the coining press. With the loop of the 9 being oval-shaped, it would be a logical conclusion that the top edge would be that point which would have the most pres- sure and break first.

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 2 (203)

    15/3/2001

    Highlight: Cherry pickers use their knowledge and skill to first identify a rarer variety, and then acquire the coin. The topic of cherry picking involves ethics and is somewhat controversial. More on that on that topic in a future Talking Beginners. The fact is if you know what to look for, you increase your ehances of finding it. If you learn to recognize rarer varieties at a glance (hopefully by a single marker), you can eliminate a lot of “common” coins quickly. Cherry picking columns like this have appeared for specific early date large cents in earlier Penny Wise issues. This time let’s look at some cherry picking short cuts for a few middle date large cents. Before I begin, I would like to stress that these short cuts will not work on some coins, which have been damaged or were not struck

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    Calcoin News, vol. 51, no. 1

    1/3/1997

    Highlight: D TO LIFE MEMBERSHIP LM 31-9 Michael M. Stanley LM 1-38 Arthur M. Kagin SUMMARY Membership on November 21 , 1 996 685 New Members, Nov. 21, 1996 through Jan. 30, 1997 39 Reinstated 1 Resigned 2 Convert to Life Membership 2 Membership total as of January 30, 1997 723 Total Individual Life Members 120 Total Club Life Members 1 1 Cherrypickers ’ News The newsletter for all variety specialists Cherry pickersThe 8.5 x 11 inch page format allows for full size photos of exciting new finds, new research, and an up-to-date price guide section. For your subscription, send $19.95 for six issues to : Cherry pickers' News P.0. Box 15487, Savannah, GA 31416-2178 - 35 -

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    Longacre's Ledger (#84)

    /2012

    Highlight: he informed me that the coin I sent did not match the pictures of the Snow-27 variety in the Cherry Pickers Guide. He suggested that I contact Rick Snow for his advice on this. I contacted Rick and he informed me that the pictures in the Cherry Pickers Guide were wrong and he would correct the problem, Rick contacted Bill Fivaz, co-author of the guide, and Dennis Tucker, the publisher at Whitman. They were both concerned about errors in the book and made notes to fix the mix- up in future editions. They then contacted Mike Farone at PCGS about the problem. Within one day, I was contacted by PCGS telling me to return the coin and they would re-holder the coin with the Snow-27 attribution, I now have the coin back from PCGS in the well deserved Snow-27 attribution holder. I was also contacte

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    The Asylum, Fall 1991

    31/12/1991

    Highlight: and Fivaz and Stanton to autograph Cherry Pickers Guide II. Off to Ford’s great talk in the Theater. Curators ran away with World Series Semi- final. Denis Loring and I decide to market a plan whereby books are slabbed with a micro dot containing the contents of the book. Maybe we should copyright the idea before David Hall claims it. Loring showed me 1794 Double struck large cent. Saw, but didn’t buy, the Noyes books on Large Cents. Went to Superior’s meeting on New Auctions. Dinner at Italian restaurant at Hyatt with crazy waitress. Ken, Myron and his wife Daryl, Armand, Barry Tayman, Charlie Davis, Wayne Homren and Joel Orosz. Left C.P.A. Myron to deal with the tab: $70 for a salad!! N.B.S. Board Meeting at 8 P.M. accomplished quite a bit with minutes hopefully in a later issue of The

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    N.O.W. News, Spring 2000

    1/4/2000

    Highlight: migrant workers from Texas became the primary cherry pickers. When this work force was granted the minimum wage, profit in raising cherries became marginal, and automation in the form of “shakers” replaced the hand labor, which subsequently dried up the need for token coinage. The effect of the minimum wage ended large scale cherry raising in Door County because the tree shaker which had replaced the migrant worker was a mixed blessing. Not only was the machine very expensive, which the growers might have been able to overcome, but it proved to reduce tree life by 1 0 years. As the tree shakers reduced tree life and the economic conditions of the cherry business was such that replacement orchards were not planted. Thus, ending the era of the big cherry groves and began the boom in land

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    E-Gobrecht, vol. 2, no. 9

    1/9/2006

    Highlight: Cherry pickers, are you listening? Advertisements for the Sale of Liberty Seated Coinage None this issue. Calendar - New club year starts - September 1 , 2006 - Next issue of The Gobrecht Journal - November 2006. - LSCC Regional meeting - Baltimore, MD coin show, November 10 th , TBD. - Quarter census mailed out - Early 2007. - 1 00 th Issue of The Gobrecht Journal - November 2007 Information, input, comments, or suggestions for improvements to this E-Gobrecht are actively solicited from anyone and may be sent to wb8cpy@arrl.net or by writing or calling: Bill Bugert Editor, E-Gobrecht P.O. Box 3761 Gettysburg, PA 17325-6927 (717)337-0229 To be added or removed from the E-Gobrecht mailing list, send an email message with the words "Subscribe/Unsubscribe" in the subject line of the message t

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 40, No. 3

    1/5/2006

    Highlight: I sometimes hear the cherry-pickers lamentation that there are no more cherries left to pick — the tree is barren, with all those early coppers attributed, graded, and priced, usually immodestly, by unscrupulous dealers and knowledgeable collectors. I think this sentiment is partially true; it’s a very rare occasion to find a dealer with boxes or piles of unattributed copper for sifting, and when a collector does they’re usually of the lowest and least desirable condition. While picking through boxes of fine old coppers merely grouped by date may indeed be anachronistic, I disagree that cherry-picking has faded as well — it has merely shifted form. 119

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 2, no. 3

    1/9/1990

    Highlight: It is from the Cherry-pickers Guide by Bill Fivaz (pronounced Fee-vah) and J.T. Stanton. "Die Variety, Any significant change in the intended design of a coin, whether accidental or intentional, repeating exactly on each coin struck from that particular die." So as to not dazzle you with footwork, let me list, briefly, where I believe our priorities should be. A major or minor design change such as a wing being made longer on a new hub. A doubled die coin where a die exhibits part or all of the design doubled and transfers that doubling on to a finished coin. An over date (OD) (1893/2 dime) or over mint mark (OMM), where a different mint mark or part thereof can be seen under a finished one (D/S or S/D etc.). A repunched mint mark (RPM) (1901-0/ Horizontal O dime) or repunched date (RPD),

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 3, no. 2

    1/6/1991

    Highlight: Second Edition The Cherry pickers’ Guide To Rare Die Varieties By Bili Fivaz, NLG ).T. Stanton, NLG Authors of the First Edition which sold out in 12 months THE MUST FOR ALL SERIOUS AND BEGINNING COLLECTORS OF RARE DIE VARIETIES • Foreword by Walter Breen • Listing over 290 rare but little known die varieties • More than 100 new listings • Over 400 clear & improved photos • Pricing and interest factor information • Breen cross-reference numbers • Thumb index for quick reference • Names and addresses of specialty clubs • Other important information, for dealers, too! PROmS FROM THE SALE OF BOOKS WILL SPONSOR TWO YNs TO 1992 A.N.A. SUMMER SEMINAR RETAIL PRICE STILL $ 14.95 (Softbound) (For a Much Larger Book) Spiral bound: $19.95 — Hardbound: $29.95 Add $3 P&JI for 1st Class Mall or $1 for

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 8, no. 2

    1/6/1997

    Highlight: Considered a “cherry pickers dream coin” by David Lawrence in his classic text on the series, this rare variety is the object of every Barber half collectors fancy and is highly sought. Strangely, the popularity of this coin has shifted back and forth throughout its century old ex- istence. Walter Breen credits Howard Newcomb with its discovery, as he displayed a piece at the A.N.A. conven- tion of 1914. The credit how- ever belongs to Augustus G. Heaton, who describes the find in his published work, “Mint Marks” in 1893. These facts were recently pointed out by the Bow- ers and Merena staff in their Louis E. Eliasberg catalog, where a Gem example (MS-67) sold for $59,000 in April. (Photo’s) The variety was popular enough to be included in Wayte Raymond’s “Penny Boards” of the 1930’s. I

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 8, no. 2

    1/6/1997

    Highlight: Not to mention the “Cherry Pickers” like myself, who will be on the look out for this coin at coming shows. Pauls efforts display the enjoyment and rewards of researching the coins you collect, as well as benefitting the future of numismatics . Page 14

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 11, no. 1

    1/3/2000

    Highlight: Dave adds: “The micrO'O is a cherry pickers dream coin.' It seems likely that there are still a few to be found.” Not surprisingly, several new pieces have surfaced since Dave’s initial 1991 inventory. As a good example, I personally acquired a PCGS FI 2 example from Dave Lawrence in September of 1997. At the time, Dave personally stated to me that it was the only piece graded Fine he was aware of! Since that time. I’ve often wondered at the actual population of Micro Os, since evidence of new discoveries does leak out periodically. It’s January, 2000. With the Winter issue of our Journal in hand, I read with great interest on page 16 an article by Steve Szcerbiak, in which he reported seeing a “Fine or better” Micro O at the BCCS meeting he attended at last year’s Continued on next page

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 26, no. 3

    1/9/2015

    Highlight: It wasn’t as meaty 7 as the Cherry pickers’ Guide to Rare Die Varieties , of course, but it included more die varieties than the regular- edition Red Book for many coin types. Page 17

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    Winning Ways: Official Publication of Women in Numismatics, vol. 3, no. 3

    1/7/1994

    Highlight: 1994 THE BIBLIOPHILE By Ken Bressett The Cherry Pickers Guide to Rare Die Varieties. Third Edition. By Bill Fivaz and J.T. Stanton. T his book is now in its third revised and expanded edi- tion. If you are not now familiar with it, you simply haven't been in touch with the coin market lately. Cherrypieking is the hobby of today, and is fast setting standards for tomorrow. For anyone still living in the dark ages, "cherrypicking" is the art of finding new and interesting minor die varieties among coins that otherwise might seem dull and mundane. For many collectors this hobby is still exciting because it is possible to find rare and valuable coins in the most unlikely places. No, not still in circulation, but often in dealers stocks or even hiding in their own collections. This book is a

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    Winning Ways: Official Publication of Women in Numismatics, vol. 5, no. 2

    1/4/1996

    Highlight: I am sure that the “cherry pickers” among you will enjoy this section. For others, myself included, it seems like great information that we may never get to use. Still, it belongs in a book like this, and is obviously well done and a pioneer effort. You get your money’s worth in this book. It is big, full of great information, and is illustrated with 530 photographs. There is even a handy glossary of Continued on page 17 WINNING WAYS. ..WOMEN IN NUMISMATICS

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    Winning Ways: Official Publication of Women in Numismatics, vol. 11, no. 2

    1/4/2002

    Highlight: Cherry Pickers won’t add much fruit to their baskets. The Most Overlooked Event in Numismatics Bungee jumping will quicken your pulse. But if you’re look- ing for intense concentration, visible tension, and a flurry of activity based on extreme urgency, you’ll find more than enough of it in the lot viewing room at a Heritage auction sixty-five minutes prior to the start of a session. Regardless of how sophisticated and enticing they become, I predict Internet-only auctions will have a hard time con- vincing serious buyers that they no longer need to physical- ly view coins before bidding on them. At Heritage, we spare no expense producing accurate and appropriately detailed descriptions of every lot. To this we add state of the art color and black and white photographs, plus Internet image

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    The Civil War Token Journal, vol. 26, no. 1-4

    1/3/1992

    Highlight: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: CHERRY PICKERS Dear Mr. Mumford, Received the Spring issue of the Journal and wanted you to know I liked the cherrypicker’s column idea. Assuming other collectors are like me, the new column will be an interesting and well read addition to the Journal I’ve been collecting Patriotics since 1973 when a feUow employee and part time dealer (Rich Hartzog) introduced the series to me. Building an inventory of uncirculated Patriotics in the seventies when prices were way down and most coin dealers considered tokens junk or were unaware of them became a hobby. Our local coin club sponsored a monthly coin bourse, and I was usually there, walking around and asking the dozen or so local dealers if they had any tokens. Usually the answer was, “No”, but you never know. This

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    Calcoin News, vol. 50, no. 2

    1/6/1996

    Highlight: send SI 9.95 for six issues to : Cherry pickers’ News P.O. Box 15487, Savannah, GA 31416-2178 -2 1 -

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 2 (203)

    15/3/2001

    Highlight: 1830 This is another great year for cherry pickers. Five of the 1 1 known varieties for the year draw a premium and knowing only two different markers can help you recognize four of these. - 122 -

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 2 (203)

    15/3/2001

    Highlight: 1834 1834 has that one thing needed to create interest in a year for cherry pickers - a proof only variety that is an R7! This variety, N-7, is known in circulated grade, so there is always that chance.... When looking at 1834’s, look at the date and obverse stars first. You are looking for a large 8 in the date and large stars (the point of the 6* star on large star varieties always points to the right of the coronet tip). If you found one like this, flip it over and see what you have. First look at the letters of the legend. Are they small? If so, you Just found an N-5, a tough R4 that usually brings three figures for even low grade examples. Large letters? Look at the position of the leaf tip under the second S in STATES. If it is Just a little left of the right side of the letter, you

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 4 (205)

    15/7/2001

    Highlight: is it because the cherry-pickers have just been cherry-picked?” Phyllis Thompson had a different take: “As to the CC debate, isn't the bottom line’ really how the auction cataloger defines a coin... /.a, its CC #? I dont have any answer, nor do I think anyone else does at this point. Would it be possible to appoint Del, Bill, Jack Robinson, or anyone else to be ‘the official Condition Census Reporter?’ At least that way, we would all be talking about the same numbers, no matter how accurate, or inaccurate they might be. How do others feel about this?” Frank Wilkinson said “this is the absolutely greatest explanation of the current state of chaos I have seen thus far. The only thing I would add to it is to quote Roger Cohen when he was in the shop of BM Douglas. Roger asked for a magnifying

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 4 (205)

    15/7/2001

    Highlight: 1818 1818 is a great year for cherry pickers because it has the “14K” of middle date cents, the N 4. Once considered the rarest of the middle date cents, this variety is now an R-4+. But the popularity and “mystique” of the N-4 still result in a hefty premium for the variety. 1818 also has a second variety that draws a good premium, the N 2, also an R-4+ coin. When looking at an 1818, look at the relationship between 1 and the last 8 in the date and stars 1 and 13 (those closest to the date) first. Are these stars REAL close to the date digits (just a little wider than the width of the 1 away from star 1 and less than the width of the 8 away from star 13)? If so, you have an N 3 or an N 4. So, flip the coin over and check the alignment of the leaf tip under the second S in STATES. If the

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 35, No. 4 (205)

    15/7/2001

    Highlight: 1838 1838 is another good year for cherry pickers. There are four varieties/die states that draw premiums. The two die states, N 1 1 (R-5 with a cud at K 7 obverse) and N 14 (R-7 with a cud at K10.5 obverse) are recognizable at a glance. The other two, N 15 and N 16, both R-5+ varieties, share a reverse (N 1 1 also shares this reverse) that is identified by the broken right upright on the letter N in CENT. If you have a broken “N” reverse, flip the coin over and look at the obverse. Look at the brow lock and the letters ER in LIBERTY in particular. If the top right side of the E is noticeably higher than the top left side of fhe R, you have an N 11. If the top right side of the E is just a little higher than the R, look at the hair on Liberty’s forehead. If this brow lock ends in a point

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 37, No. 4 (217)

    15/7/2003

    Highlight: found by one of our regular cherry pickers. Bill Noyes reported that he will be compiling information for a new early copper price list and has requested input from several of the members. Jon Lusk will be providing technical assistance for this project. Bill plans to have this available by the ANA convention this summer. Jon Lusk also reported the status of the ongoing Numistudy DVD project. Other discussions included a "buyers beware" alert on eBay lots using incorrect pictures, and the current Region 8 debates about dividing future EAC sales into two sessions. The meeting was then adjourned. Our next scheduled western regional meeting will be at the Long Beach Show on Friday, September 19, 2003 at 7:00 PM. ************* SOUTHEAST REGIONAL MEETING Chip Cutcliff An EAC meeting was held

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    Calcoin News, vol. 40, no. 4

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: SCCC & Love Tokens LARRY BENSON Cherry Pickers Delight XAN CHAMBERLAIN Off Strike Coins of U.S. Mint BILL FIVAZ Hobo Nickels AL LO Coin Collecting - Getting Started DAN SHATTUC Grading Mercury Dimes DEAN SODERSTROM Traveling the World - Bring Home a Coin ****!(■* + NOTICE THROUGH THE NUMIS- MATIC GLASS will be featured again in the Winter Issue. DO A FRIEND A FAVOR Introduce them to Numismatics with a CSNA membership! 1 17

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    Calcoin News, vol. 40, no. 4

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: Slides were shown by Dan Shattuc on grading Mercury Dimes: Larry Benson on Cherry Pickers and Hobo Nickels by Bill Fivaz. The tentative date of either October I 1th or 18th has been set for the Second Annual Banquet. VALLEJO NUMISMATIC SOCIETY SUMMARIZES 14TH ANNUAL COIN SHOW AS “SIMPLY GOOD” Stanley Turrini, Show Coordinator, re- ports that although they experienced some weak points, (i.e.) attendance was down at the collector meetings and the Educational forum, by most standards, it was a suc- cessful show. The bourse was a sell-out; attendance was brisk and all available tickets for the Gold Coin Drawing were sold. Winners of the Gold Coin Drawing were: 1st prize - Howard Lonsdale 1910s Double Eagle: 2nd prize - Stan Turrini — 1898 Eagle: 3rd prize Man- uel Puebla — 1902 Half Eagle: 4th

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    The Shekel, vol. 46, no. 2 and 3

    1/3/2013

    Highlight: Cherry-pickers were certainly to the fore in the Israeli section of the auction. First up were 15 lots from the Anglo-Palestinian Bank followed by two lots from its suc- cessor Bank Leumi Le-Israel. The history of both institutions is intimately tied up with both Jewish settlement of colonial Palestine and the establishment of modern Israel. The Anglo-Palestinian Bank was established in 1902 by the Jewish Colonial Trust, itself incorporated in London in 1899 at the Second Zionist Congress. Continued

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    The TNA News, July-August 2007

    1/7/2007

    Highlight: “Cherry pickers Top 25.” Greater Houston Coin Club May Meeting - Richard Laster called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. There were 34 attendees including guests. Educational Presentation: Richard opened his presentation on “Fractional Currency” by passing examples of a type set from his own collection. Fractional currency (paper notes of U.S. government issue at face values under $1.00) is an outgrowth of the Civil War - or as Richard would say “the War of Northern Aggression” of 1861-1865. Other, partly concurrent, attempts at necessity currency included postage stamps on cards, encased postage, and privately issued Civil War Tokens. Richard recapped the final tally on Fractional Currency issue: $369 million; of which $1.8 million is recorded as still outstanding (about _ of 1%). The

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    E-Gobrecht, vol. 3, no. 8

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: Grading companies certify varieties and Dealers are more careful to keep cherry- pickers at bay. The real turning point is when a die variety is listed in a major price guide. It would help if more reference books were available (i.e. WB?). The E-Gobrecht Volume 3, Issue 8 2

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 4, No. 6(21)

    15/11/1970

    Highlight: Paul's philosophy is simple: "I let all the hot shot cherry- pickers run through and scrape off the high grade and price rar- ities. Then I take over about the third day, dig through the usually come up with something I need." It is no wonder that he is affectionately known as the "junk man". His system works. „ y®ar at Philadelphia, he picked up an S-45 and an acquired a rare 1805/4 half, and he dazzled the sale^^ finest known 1809 new reverse half cent from Rarcoa's auction Everyone who showed up during that week seened to enjoy the camaraderie which is ever present among members of the EAC) And invariably, the bourse or the auction or a trade with another EAC member provided at least one addition to everyone's collection. or example, Paul Munson gave me Fine specimens of S-245 and S-256

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 10, No. 4(55)

    15/7/1976

    Highlight: the gloats of cherry pickers, and the polemics all indicate a lively organization. For your sake and for that of the readers, I hope that all the muttering about editing has died down. I write technical material which is then reviewed, revised, and polished before it goes to a journal for publication. But even so, the editor catches goofs and mistakes every time. All authors will learn this in time, but it must be learned by each generation. After I have recovered from my immersion in P-W, I will try to write down some questions and comments from the viewpoint of the new collector of old coppers and will try them out on you . Do you know what are the most readily available guides for attributing large cents from 1 793-1 857? They are McGirk's tables, as republished by you and Herb Silberma

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 20, No. 3(114)

    15/5/1986

    Highlight: We next heard from some cherry pickers: John Fettinger related the true story about how he acquired his 1 830 N-1 1 at an upstate New York show bourse for $10 (and refused an offer of $300 for it two hours later). Phil Mann told of finding his 1 796 NG-1 at a flea market near his home in 1 976; it grades VF-20. Jack Jones then passed around his 1823 N-2, graded AU-50+, that he picked up at a stamp show in 1980. He had personally compared it to the Starr coin and found it to be equal in grade. John Fettinger also told the story of visiting a merchant in a small upper New England town a few years back. The fellow took John into his back room and showed him a 40 quart milk can filled with large cents. The bad news: it wasn't for sale, and John got nary a one from that treasure trove. Ghuck

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 22, No. 4(127)

    15/7/1988

    Highlight: 242 My First EAC Meeting Herb Silberman 243 Advice to Would-Be Cherry Pickers William Easley 244 More on 1806 Half Cents on Cut-Down Cents Bob Travis 244 A Draped Bust Half Cent Collection Darwin B. Palmer, Jr. 247 Measuring "Cent Sickness" Jim Young, Jr. 248 Attributing the Sheldon-210 Dick Punchard 249 A Modest Inquiry LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters Urging the Continued Publication of CQR 251 Miscellaneous Letters 254 SWAPS AND SALES 257 -205a- XXII/127

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 22, No. 4(127)

    15/7/1988

    Highlight: ADVICE TO WOULD-BE CHERRY PICKERS Herb Silberman Regarding the 1794's, 1795's, and 1976's: Watch the T in LIBERTY. Know the common position, and at a glance you can spot any difference. 1794 . The common position: the upright of T is just over the junction of the hair and forehead (JHF) . If the T is too far left, you have found S-17 (R5) , NC-4 (R8) , S-18 (R7-with edge device of '93), S-19 (R6-with '93 edge device), S-20 (R4) , S-35 (R5+) , S-37 (R7-) , S-67 (R3) , S-68 (R5+) , S-71 (R2) , or S-72 (R2+) ; if the T is too far right, you have found one of a group of more common varieties: S-57 (Rl) , S-60 (R3) , S-61 (R4) , or S-63 (R3) . So in general, look for cents with the T in LIBERTY left of the junction of the hair with the forehead; you just may have a cherry! 1795 . The T is out o

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    Maryland TAMS Journal, Vol. 19, No. 3 (77)

    1/9/1998

    Highlight: What a cherry pickers holiday for me! Pulling out the Maryland Merchant Tokens book, I attributed my tokens as the Bowman S- 370-B-5 or Miller- 187, the Dorman was S60-D81a which happens to be the scarcer variety (and instead of &), the Concordia was S60-C 195-50 and finally the Koehler storecard as S60-K165. Totally up my purchases quickly in my mind, I came up with at least $5,000 worth of items that cost me only $200. Not too shabby for a day of browsing the antique shops. AJ1 of sudden my heart started to pound again and I started to shake. Then the full reality started to set in and the next thing that happened was that I woke up! Amen! VOL. XIX NO. 3 WHOLE NO. 77 MD TAMS JOURNAL 9

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    The Nor'wester

    1/10/2013

    Highlight: Oftentimes a good part of their decision is based mainly on public demand and popular books such as “Cherry Pickers” adding a variety. Henry Mitchell’s “Roman Bronze Coinage” seg- ment was very fun and interesting to see all the coins Henry brought along and generously shared countless stories. He brought such passion to the class that we could see how collecting Roman coins is truly a his- toric peek into the past. As was Bill Rosenblum’s “An Introduction to Numismatics of the Holy Land,” just to name a few as there were so many interesting segments and never a boring moment! On the last day of the class we got to take a “behind-the-doors” tour of the famous ANA Money Museum where countless rarities are displayed to the public. There was a 1913 Liberty nickel, two 1804 Sil- ver Dollars,

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    The Asylum, Fall 1991

    31/12/1991

    Highlight: and Fivaz and Stanton to autograph Cherry Pickers Guide II. Off to Ford’s great talk in the Theater. Curators ran away with World Series Semi- final. Denis Loring and I decide to market a plan whereby books are slabbed with a micro dot containing the contents of the book. Maybe we should copyright the idea before David Hall claims it. Loring showed me 1794 Double struck large cent. Saw, but didn’t buy, the Noyes books on Large Cents. Went to Superior’s meeting on New Auctions. Dinner at Italian restaurant at Hyatt with crazy waitress. Ken, Myron and his wife Daryl, Armand, Barry Tayman, Charlie Davis, Wayne Homren and Joel Orosz. Left C.P.A. Myron to deal with the tab: $70 for a salad!! N.B.S. Board Meeting at 8 P.M. accomplished quite a bit with minutes hopefully in a later issue of The

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    N.O.W. News, Spring 2000

    1/4/2000

    Highlight: migrant workers from Texas became the primary cherry pickers. When this work force was granted the minimum wage, profit in raising cherries became marginal, and automation in the form of “shakers” replaced the hand labor, which subsequently dried up the need for token coinage. The effect of the minimum wage ended large scale cherry raising in Door County because the tree shaker which had replaced the migrant worker was a mixed blessing. Not only was the machine very expensive, which the growers might have been able to overcome, but it proved to reduce tree life by 1 0 years. As the tree shakers reduced tree life and the economic conditions of the cherry business was such that replacement orchards were not planted. Thus, ending the era of the big cherry groves and began the boom in land

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    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2004

    1/12/2004

    Highlight: Mike Ringo was already making dealer rounds in spite of no coins being on display (take a lesson cherry pickers), though I don’t think Tom Rinaldo would have let any cherries slip through his fingers. I also distributed a limited edition book I had put together for the participants of a coin discussion get-together we had had at Roger Siboni’s beach house during the summer. By the time the C4 reception came around, all the usual and expected players were there for the free shrimp and other great food. Now that I am paying the bills as the C4 treasurer, I can say that the $20 dues goes a very long way with a reception each of the three nights of the C4 convention that easily 47

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    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2004

    1/12/2004

    Highlight: Though I realized that the cherry pickers had already made their harvest, I was still prepared to find some hidden fruit. Once among the dealers, it was two hours of fun. Somewhat sated, 1 headed back to the C4 area where to my delight I discovered that Buell and Angie Ish had arrived. It was also great to find Tony Carlotta, Phil Mossman, Lou Jordan (I had him sign his book for me!!), Jim Rosen, and especially Bob Vlack. The reason I was so pleased to see Bob Vlack was that bought his newest book on French Colonial Coinage, which he signed, as well as two of his previous books that I had lugged to Boston with me. Bob pointed out to me that his two older books, which I had obtained at auction, had once belonged to Walter Breen! ! I also went over a paper on Saint Patrick Halfpence which

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