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    Coley

    GRAVESIDE CEREMONY FOR COLONIAL MINTER WILLIAM COLEY

    06/26/2016

    Highlight: COLEY http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v19n26a16.html

    Gary Trudgen submitted this item about a ceremony that was recently held at the gravesite of William Coley, a partner in the Vermont and Machin’s Mills mints. Thanks! -Editor

    Coley gravestone">William <b style=Coleyta-flickr-embed="false" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/coinbooks/27203247373/in/dateposted-public/" title="William Coley

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: Sequential page 121 October 1964 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Page 62 In July of 1785 the books of the Reformed Dutch Church of New York City recorded the birth of daughter Elizabeth to William and Sybil Coley. In the same year Daniel Van Voorhis was operating a silversmith shop in Princeton, New Jersey, where the Continental Congress was then in session. Deniel Van Voorhit; was born August JO, 1755 (died June 10, 1824). His workmanship, according to Carl M. Williams in his book Silversmiths of New Jersey , indicates very strongly that he apprenticed in New York City. He was probably an evacuee of New York City when the British occupied it. On December 4, 1782, he left Philadelphia and set up shop in Princeton. In 1785 the Pennsylvania Line mutined in Philadelphia and sought out Robert and

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: Sequential page 121 October 1964 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Page 62 In July of 1785 the books of the Reformed Dutch Church of New York City recorded the birth of daughter Elizabeth to William and Sybil Coley. In the same year Daniel Van Voorhis was operating a silversmith shop in Princeton, New Jersey, where the Continental Congress was then in session. Deniel Van Voorhit; was born August JO, 1755 (died June 10, 1824). His workmanship, according to Carl M. Williams in his book Silversmiths of New Jersey , indicates very strongly that he apprenticed in New York City. He was probably an evacuee of New York City when the British occupied it. On December 4, 1782, he left Philadelphia and set up shop in Princeton. In 1785 the Pennsylvania Line mutined in Philadelphia and sought out Robert and

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    The C4 Newsletter, Spring 2002

    1/3/2002

    Highlight: I found that very little is actually written about Van Voorhis & Coley outside of Sylvester Crosby’s coverage of the Machin’s Mill indenture. For example, in the entire Colonial Newsletter index, Coleys credited with cutting the dies for one of the most attractive of colonial coins, the Vermont Landscape, as well as one of the crudest, the Baby Head. Other references likewise turned up scant information. My curiosity now piqued, 1 set out to find out all that I could about the Van Voorhis and Coley tandem. In particular, I wanted to know if they were producing silverware while coining at Rupert. Fortunately, I live in an area with access to very good research facilities and was soon able

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 18, No. 4(103)

    15/7/1984

    Highlight: The local copper was wrecking the dies produced by Coley. If Harmon were to make his operation profitable, he needed more dies, and faster. Having learned of Buell's new technique, Harmon felt that this was the answer to his problem. When he petitioned the Vermont legislature for an extension, contacts were made within the legislature to approve the design change which was necessary in order to use Buell’s dies. Such approval came on October 26, 1786. Harmon imme- diately sent word to Buell, who then dispatched his son, William, with the dies. William arrived in Vermont in late 1786. I believe that his arrival at this time was not a coincidence, but was the direct result of the design change and Harmon's newly-established connection with Abel Buell. Something, however, went wrong. We know

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 18, No. 4(103)

    15/7/1984

    Highlight: The local copper was wrecking the dies produced by Coley. If Harmon were to make his operation profitable, he needed more dies, and faster. Having learned of Buell's new technique, Harmon felt that this was the answer to his problem. When he petitioned the Vermont legislature for an extension, contacts were made within the legislature to approve the design change which was necessary in order to use Buell’s dies. Such approval came on October 26, 1786. Harmon imme- diately sent word to Buell, who then dispatched his son, William, with the dies. William arrived in Vermont in late 1786. I believe that his arrival at this time was not a coincidence, but was the direct result of the design change and Harmon's newly-established connection with Abel Buell. Something, however, went wrong. We know

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    The C4 Newsletter, Spring 2002

    1/3/2002

    Highlight: and Coley partnership in New York City. There is little doubt the V&C monogram stands for the firm Van Voorhis & Coleyacks the device outside the rectangle. This reference also claims V&C are working in Vermont, 1787. Louise Belden’s book plates a V&R monogram which represents Van Voorhis and Richards. She says, the mark shown is on a down turned rounded and featheredge teaspoon and is related to the initial marks used by the partnership Van Voorhis & Coley. If the “R” on this spoon were replaced by a “C” it would be identical to the Ebay spoon. The Ensko book shows the mark of Van Voorhis and Coley as V&C

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    The C4 Newsletter, Spring 2002

    1/3/2002

    Highlight: and Coleyes that shortly after the dissolution of the above partnership, they went to Vermont andjoined up with Reuben Harmon.(7) Ken Bressett says they continued their business in New York until sometime in 1786 before moving to Vermont. He further suggests that the plough-type Vermonts were produced in New York.(8) From Stephen Ensko’s book on silvermarks it is noted of the firm of Van Voorhis & Coley, “working in New York, Hanover Square, 1786.” The same source goes on to state in a short biography that Van Voorhis, “Located in NY, 1785 and in partnership with William Coley.

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: Coley, incapable or unprepared to produce a bust design on short notice, sought guidance from others in the trade. His first attempt at mak- ing a suitable coin, the Baby Head of 1786 (7-F), copies the style (e.g., Miller 1786 2. 1-A and 3-D. 1) of dies prepared for imitation Connecticut coppers by James F. Atlee of the Rahway, New Jersey mint. It is also possible that Atlee may have assisted Coley in preparing the central figures for his Vermont coin. The letter and date punches are distinctly Coley6 Plow-type dies. Additional dies of the newly adopted design were needed quickly and in larger quantities than before; at this point Harmon and Coley must have learned about the mass production hubbing techniques recently developed by Abe

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: Coley, incapable or unprepared to produce a bust design on short notice, sought guidance from others in the trade. His first attempt at mak- ing a suitable coin, the Baby Head of 1786 (7-F), copies the style (e.g., Miller 1786 2. 1-A and 3-D. 1) of dies prepared for imitation Connecticut coppers by James F. Atlee of the Rahway, New Jersey mint. It is also possible that Atlee may have assisted Coley in preparing the central figures for his Vermont coin. The letter and date punches are distinctly Coley6 Plow-type dies. Additional dies of the newly adopted design were needed quickly and in larger quantities than before; at this point Harmon and Coley must have learned about the mass production hubbing techniques recently developed by Abe

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    The Americana Sale

    Highlight: By 1784 he had relocated to New York City where he was in partnership with Simeon Bayley and Colonel William Coley, advertising themselves as gold and silver manufacturers. The following year Bayley's name was dropped from the partnership and Van Voorhis and Coley located their shop at 27 Hanover Square in New York City. In 1787 Van Voorhis and Coley drafted a partnership agreement with Ruben Harmon to make copper coins on behalf of the Republic of Vermont. Coley relocated to Rupert, Vermont, where the mint was located. About the same time. Van Voorhis and Coley filed a petition with the New York state legislature for the right to coin coppers on that state's behalf. Competitors at the time included Ephraim Brasher, James Atlee, and Thomas Machin. Later, the two entered into an agreement

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    The New York Americana Sale

    Highlight: By 1784 he had relocated to New York City where he was in partnership with Simeon Bayley and Colonel William Coley advertising themselves as gold and silver manufacturers. The following year Bayley's name was dropped from the partnership and Van Voorhis and Coley located their shop at 27 Hanover Square in New York City. In 1787 Van Voorhis and Coley drafted a partnership agreement with Ruben Harmon to make copper coins on behalf of the Republic of Vermont. Coley relocated to Rupert, Vermont, where the mint was located. About the same time, Van Voorhis and Coley filed a petition with the New York state legislature for the right to coin coppers on that state's behalf. Competitors at the time included Ephraim Brasher, James Atlee, and Thomas Machin. Later, the two entered into an agreement

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: Legends were added to these dies by Coleytical punches used on his earlier Baby Head coin. The striking of Bust Left coins continued for the final few months of 1786 and undoubtedly well into 1787. The single reverse die dated 1787 (I) broke quickly, and its obverse (9) was again combined with a 1786 die to produce an additional quantity of the 9-H variety as is confirmed by a die crack progression. Early in 1787, Coleys for expanding their coining activities. On February 16, they petitioned for a New York coining franchise (Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York, 1787, p. 53). Failing this, Coley left for Vermont and joined in partnership with Reuben Harmon. Bust Righ

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: tabulations it appears quite definate that William Coley did not leave New York City until late 1786 or early 1787. The writer believes that the circumstances of the Vermont coinage were the following* The partnership in which Van Voorhis, Bayley, Coley, and Cox were associated lasted only a short while, and Cox and Simeon A. Bayley left the group. The writer has been unable to ascertain the first name of Cox, but believes there is a good chance that it was Albion. Van Voorhis and Coleytaken at the Rahway mint by Albion Cox. In 1787» they went into partnership with Reuben Harmon to make the dies fer the third series of Vermont coins. Coley moved to Rupert, Vermont; Van Voorhis stayed in New

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 48

    1/3/1977

    Highlight: Directory listed "Van Voorhis & Coleyrsmiths, 27 Hanover Square. February 16, 1787 Daniel Van Voorhis and William Cooley as residents of New York unsuccessfully petitioned for New York State copper coinage contract. January 1, 1787 Connecticut "Company for Coining Coppers" ceased coining at their New Haven mint. June 7, 1787 Machin's Mill - Rupert partnership effected with the Rupert partners, including William Coley, agreeing that on or before July 1, 1787 they would complete the coining "Works they are now erecting at Rupert" and that Harmon and Coleyed the Fugio design by amending the recommendation of July 4. July 6, 1790 Census listed "Ruibln" Harmon and William Coley as "Heads of Families" resident in

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 92

    1/10/1992

    Highlight: William Coleym was short-lived, but it is likely that he had been employed by the firm since its inception in December 1 784. He left the business in April 1 785 and a few months later, in July, Bayley did the same. Apparently a dispute between Bayley and Cox was the cause of their departure. Later that year they were involved in litigation against each other within the Mayor’s Court. Van Voorhis and Coley, who continued the business at the Hanover address, soon became involved with Reuben Harmon, Jr. from Rupert, Vermont. The Vermont Legislature had awarded Harmon the privilege of coining copper for the republic. The grant was for a period of two years beginning on July 1

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 92

    1/10/1992

    Highlight: William Coley, who had moved from New York City in March of 1787 to assist with the coinage in Rupert, had purchased a large farm near the Rupert mint. On January 23, 1788, Coley purchased a small parcel of land from John Darror. This lot, which was about an acre, adjoined Coley’s farm and contained a dwelling house. Samuel Atlee witnessed this land deed, along with Israel Smith who was then a Justice of Peace in Rupert. Perhaps this transaction was for Samuel’s benefit, providing him a home which he rented from Coley, while he assisted with the Rupert coinage operation. It is unknown exactly how long Samuel remained in Rupert but probably in late 1788, when it became apparent that their coinage operation was doomed, he moved on, this time to FairHaven, Vermont, a small village in Rutland

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: Legends were added to these dies by Coleytical punches used on his earlier Baby Head coin. The striking of Bust Left coins continued for the final few months of 1786 and undoubtedly well into 1787. The single reverse die dated 1787 (I) broke quickly, and its obverse (9) was again combined with a 1786 die to produce an additional quantity of the 9-H variety as is confirmed by a die crack progression. Early in 1787, Coleys for expanding their coining activities. On February 16, they petitioned for a New York coining franchise (Journal of the Assembly of the State of New York, 1787, p. 53). Failing this, Coley left for Vermont and joined in partnership with Reuben Harmon. Bust Righ

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    The Early Coins of America

    1/1/1875

    Highlight: The said William Coley his Executors & Administrators, one tenth part thereof both in Profit & Loss. The said Elias Jackson his Executors & Administrators One tenth jiart thereof both in Profit & Loss the said ]3aniel Van Voorhis, his Executors & Administrators, one tenth part thereof both in Profit & Loss. The said Samuel Atlee, his Executors & Administrators one tenth part thereof both in profit & Loss, the said James F. Atlee his Executors & Administrators one tenth part both In Pi'ofit & Loss, the said James Grier his Executors & administrators one tenth part thereof for his and their part both In profit and Loss. The said David Brooks his Executors & administrators one tenth jjart thereof for his & their part both In Profit and Loss. The said James Giles his Executors & administraf*

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: tabulations it appears quite definate that William Coley did not leave New York City until late 1786 or early 1787. The writer believes that the circumstances of the Vermont coinage were the following* The partnership in which Van Voorhis, Bayley, Coley, and Cox were associated lasted only a short while, and Cox and Simeon A. Bayley left the group. The writer has been unable to ascertain the first name of Cox, but believes there is a good chance that it was Albion. Van Voorhis and Coleytaken at the Rahway mint by Albion Cox. In 1787» they went into partnership with Reuben Harmon to make the dies fer the third series of Vermont coins. Coley moved to Rupert, Vermont; Van Voorhis stayed in New

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 48

    1/3/1977

    Highlight: Directory listed "Van Voorhis & Coleyrsmiths, 27 Hanover Square. February 16, 1787 Daniel Van Voorhis and William Cooley as residents of New York unsuccessfully petitioned for New York State copper coinage contract. January 1, 1787 Connecticut "Company for Coining Coppers" ceased coining at their New Haven mint. June 7, 1787 Machin's Mill - Rupert partnership effected with the Rupert partners, including William Coley, agreeing that on or before July 1, 1787 they would complete the coining "Works they are now erecting at Rupert" and that Harmon and Coleyed the Fugio design by amending the recommendation of July 4. July 6, 1790 Census listed "Ruibln" Harmon and William Coley as "Heads of Families" resident in

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 92

    1/10/1992

    Highlight: William Coleym was short-lived, but it is likely that he had been employed by the firm since its inception in December 1 784. He left the business in April 1 785 and a few months later, in July, Bayley did the same. Apparently a dispute between Bayley and Cox was the cause of their departure. Later that year they were involved in litigation against each other within the Mayor’s Court. Van Voorhis and Coley, who continued the business at the Hanover address, soon became involved with Reuben Harmon, Jr. from Rupert, Vermont. The Vermont Legislature had awarded Harmon the privilege of coining copper for the republic. The grant was for a period of two years beginning on July 1

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 92

    1/10/1992

    Highlight: William Coley, who had moved from New York City in March of 1787 to assist with the coinage in Rupert, had purchased a large farm near the Rupert mint. On January 23, 1788, Coley purchased a small parcel of land from John Darror. This lot, which was about an acre, adjoined Coley’s farm and contained a dwelling house. Samuel Atlee witnessed this land deed, along with Israel Smith who was then a Justice of Peace in Rupert. Perhaps this transaction was for Samuel’s benefit, providing him a home which he rented from Coley, while he assisted with the Rupert coinage operation. It is unknown exactly how long Samuel remained in Rupert but probably in late 1788, when it became apparent that their coinage operation was doomed, he moved on, this time to FairHaven, Vermont, a small village in Rutland

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    America's Money, America's Story

    /2008

    Highlight: ~ V - t 7 Oc ShO*- # * * * Colonel William Coley, a New York goldsmith, cut the dies for the evocative "Landscape" coppers of the Vermont Republic, (shown 1 .75x actual size) On June 15, 1785, the Vermont legislature granted Reuben Harmon Jr. the right to strike its copper coinage. Harmon lived in the hamlet of Rupert, in Bennington County, and here he set up his mint, with Colonel William Coley of New York as his diemaker. Coley incorporated the idea of the 14th entity into the reverse design of his coppers: here was an all-seeing eye (adapted from a contem- poraneous British import, the Nova Constellatio copper), surrounded by 13 stars. The 14th star would be Vermont, and the region’s aspirations of becoming a part of the new United States (as soon as those annoying New Yorkers saw

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    Money of the American Colonies and Confederation: A Numismatic, Economic and Historical Correlation

    /1993

    Highlight: William Coley, to prepare the dies. The first issues were the handsome landscape types of 1785 and 1786, featuring the sun rising to the right above a wooded hill with a plow facing left in the foreground, the inscription “Republic of Vermont,” in various Latin forms, and the date surround the design. The reverse simulates the Constellatio Nova coppers as it depicts a central eye of Providence with rays radiating to the periphery. 7 ’ The legend, STELLA QUARTA DECIMA, “The Fourteenth Star,’ alluded to the Republic’s ambition to become the fourteenth state. The originally prescribed 72 The major references for the history of Vermont coinage are as follows; Crosby, Early Coins, pp. 177-202; Bressett, Studies-, Richardson, Num 1947-, Partridge, RHSQ 1979. 73 There has been an attempt to link

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    The C4 Newsletter, Spring 2002

    1/3/2002

    Highlight: The Notre Dame website makes the case that Coleylikes of Paul Revere. (For an example of Van Voorhis’ work, use the google search engine and search for “Trade axes and Tomahawk collectors association.” See page one for a beautiful silver trade crown. For some reason I can’t reproduce the exact URL, hence, the search.) Getting back to the spoon, I could find absolutely no documentation, whatsoever, that Van Voorhis or Coley were working in the silver business in Rupert during the 1786-1787 period. Nor has Tony Carlotto uncovered advertisements or documents to this effect during hi

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: and William Coley, 27 Hanover Square, New York City, was selected (Everett T. Sipsey, ColN, October 1964, p. 62). Both Van Voorhis and Coley, who later became partners with Harmon in the Vermont coinage operation, continued their business in New York until sometime in 1786. Coley, who apparently cut the dies for the Plow- type coinage, may have done the work in New York, where appropriate tools and facilities would be available to him. Plow-Type Coinage of 1785-6 The three varieties of Plow-type coins dated 1785 were made from composite dies sharing common punches for lettering, date, trees, and other features. Order of emission was most likely 1-A, 2-B, and 3-C. These varieties are struck on crude, imperfect planchets and have dies oriented TT , a feature found additionally only with the

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    Coinage Of The American Confederation Period (COAC #11)

    /1996

    Highlight: He hired as diemaker Colonel William Coley, a New York City goldsmith, [from the firm] of Van Voorhis, Bailey and Coley, 27 Hanover Square.” After the operation was in progress for a time, Colonel Coley, who was “disap- pointed in the receipts, . . .joined his New York silversmith partner, Daniel van Voorhis (later of Machin’s Mills, Digitized by v Google Original from INDIANA UNIVERSITY

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: Numismatic tradition has also contended that the early dies of the Vermont coinage — those coins with the mountain range on the obve- rse and an eye with radiating glory on the reverse — were made by William Coley City. The writer has recently come across some data in a book entitled The Story of Dorset by Z. Humphrey and published in 1924 by Tuttle & Company of Rutland, Vt. which lead to the conclusion that both of these numismatic traditions may be incorrect. According to Humphrey's book, William Coley did not join forces with Reuben Harmon until after the Vermont coinage extension in 1786, and William Buell came with Connecticut "dies” after the coinage grant extension. The significance of these points is developed later in this discussion. Harmon's mint, the

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 27

    1/9/1969

    Highlight: COLEYey (TN-17) I have obtained a microfilm copy of Mr. Douglas' manuscript James Jarvis and the Fugio Coppers from A . N . S. , cut it up and mounted it in 2 x2 frames for viewing with a slide projector at home. It certainly is the greatest piece on "Colonial" coins since Crosby I It is interesting to note that Douglas also reached the almost inescapable conclusion (some 15 years before me) that Coley and not Atlee was the die maker of so many "Colonials"; however, as you know, I favor Van Voorhis over his partner, Coley. (Editor's Note: See Mr. Sipsey's NEW FACTS AND IDEAS ON THE STATE COINAGES in the October 1964 (SN 13) issue of CNL.) ☆ ☆ ☆ WEIGHTS of SIX OVER TWELVE SPECIMENS (TN-18) • # from Bill Wild; Brooklyn, New York I

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 85

    1/7/1990

    Highlight: in a research paper on American-made British halfpence. This paper, which was written by the author, is titled “James Atlee's Imitation British Halfpence” and was published in the March 1987 issue of The Colonial Newsletter. (27) . In an article titled “Vermont Copper Coinage,” Ken Bressett inaccurately states that John Bailey was a copartner with Vermont coiners Daniel Van Voorhis and William Coley (page 1 74). Bressett erroneously concluded that the Bayley in the New York City firm of Van Voorhis, Bayley, and Coleyo, the Mayor’s Court minutes of August 23, 1785 corroborates this claim. Here, in a case involving the firm of Van Voorhis, Bayley, and Coley, their full names are given. A synopsis of the New York Mayor’s Court records will be published in a future issue of The Colonial Newsle

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 86 (Supplement)

    1/10/1990

    Highlight: defendants Ordered that the Sheriff return the venire and that the trail be brought on The Jury having withdrawn and being again returned to the bar say that they find for the plaintiffs 19 pounds, 19 shillings, 8 pence damages and 6 pence costs On Motion of Mr. Hamilton Ordered Judgement Jacob Delamontanie by John Loudon his guardian Vs Daniel Van Voorhis, Simon Alexander Bailey, and William Coley The sheriff returns William Coley taken the other defendants not found on like motion Ordered the like rules as to William Coley

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 115

    1/12/2000

    Highlight: coppers was used as a model by William Coleyich equals 160 grains, down to four pennyweight and sixteen grains, which totals 1 1 1 grains), then it follows the Vermont dies had to have been completed and shipped from New York City to the mint in Rupert, Vermont by October. Thus it is assumed the 1783-dated private coppers had been produced and imported into New York sometime around midyear or early summer, allowing Coley a few months to design and produce the

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    DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT

    DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT

    05/30/2004

    Highlight: DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v07n22a07.html The E-Sylum: Volume 7, Number 22, May 30, 2004, Article 7DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT Don Coley writes: "On Monday May 24, I had the good fortune to be in the area on business and happened to have a few hours to visit the ANA in Colorado Springs. Of course, this is a great time to visit, as several world class dollar rarities such as the Dupont 1866 Dollar and the 1794 Dollar that have recently been featured in the Numismatist are on display. Unfortunately, the library was closed on Monday. Disappointment turned into delight when I recognized Barbara Gregory telling the receptionist that she would be happy to come down and work on some editing in the library while I spent a few minutes looking fo

    The E-Sylum: Volume 7, Number 22, May 30, 2004, Article 7DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT Don Cole

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: and William Coley, 27 Hanover Square, New York City, was selected (Everett T. Sipsey, ColN, October 1964, p. 62). Both Van Voorhis and Coley, who later became partners with Harmon in the Vermont coinage operation, continued their business in New York until sometime in 1786. Coley, who apparently cut the dies for the Plow- type coinage, may have done the work in New York, where appropriate tools and facilities would be available to him. Plow-Type Coinage of 1785-6 The three varieties of Plow-type coins dated 1785 were made from composite dies sharing common punches for lettering, date, trees, and other features. Order of emission was most likely 1-A, 2-B, and 3-C. These varieties are struck on crude, imperfect planchets and have dies oriented TT , a feature found additionally only with the

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    The Early Coins of America

    1/1/1875

    Highlight: 197 ColeyAtlee, David Brooks, James Gi-ier, James Giles and Thomas Machin by their Articles of Copartnership, bearing date the eighteenth day of xVpril One Thousand seven hundred and eighty seven have become Copartners & Joint Traders together in such Trades and Merchandize, and in the coinage of Coppers, as shall be for their most Benefit and Advantage and "Whereas the said Keuben Harmon, AVilliam Coley, Elias Jackson, & Daniel Yan Voorhis, have agreed to admit the said Samuel Atlee, James F. Atlee, David Brooks, James Grier, James Giles & Thomas Machi

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    Coinage Of The American Confederation Period (COAC #11)

    /1996

    Highlight: He hired as diemaker Colonel William Coley, a New York City goldsmith, [from the firm] of Van Voorhis, Bailey and Coley, 27 Hanover Square.” After the operation was in progress for a time, Colonel Coley, who was “disap- pointed in the receipts, . . .joined his New York silversmith partner, Daniel van Voorhis (later of Machin’s Mills, Digitized by v Google Original from INDIANA UNIVERSITY

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: Numismatic tradition has also contended that the early dies of the Vermont coinage — those coins with the mountain range on the obve- rse and an eye with radiating glory on the reverse — were made by William Coley City. The writer has recently come across some data in a book entitled The Story of Dorset by Z. Humphrey and published in 1924 by Tuttle & Company of Rutland, Vt. which lead to the conclusion that both of these numismatic traditions may be incorrect. According to Humphrey's book, William Coley did not join forces with Reuben Harmon until after the Vermont coinage extension in 1786, and William Buell came with Connecticut "dies” after the coinage grant extension. The significance of these points is developed later in this discussion. Harmon's mint, the

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 27

    1/9/1969

    Highlight: COLEYey (TN-17) I have obtained a microfilm copy of Mr. Douglas' manuscript James Jarvis and the Fugio Coppers from A . N . S. , cut it up and mounted it in 2 x2 frames for viewing with a slide projector at home. It certainly is the greatest piece on "Colonial" coins since Crosby I It is interesting to note that Douglas also reached the almost inescapable conclusion (some 15 years before me) that Coley and not Atlee was the die maker of so many "Colonials"; however, as you know, I favor Van Voorhis over his partner, Coley. (Editor's Note: See Mr. Sipsey's NEW FACTS AND IDEAS ON THE STATE COINAGES in the October 1964 (SN 13) issue of CNL.) ☆ ☆ ☆ WEIGHTS of SIX OVER TWELVE SPECIMENS (TN-18) • # from Bill Wild; Brooklyn, New York I

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 85

    1/7/1990

    Highlight: in a research paper on American-made British halfpence. This paper, which was written by the author, is titled “James Atlee's Imitation British Halfpence” and was published in the March 1987 issue of The Colonial Newsletter. (27) . In an article titled “Vermont Copper Coinage,” Ken Bressett inaccurately states that John Bailey was a copartner with Vermont coiners Daniel Van Voorhis and William Coley (page 1 74). Bressett erroneously concluded that the Bayley in the New York City firm of Van Voorhis, Bayley, and Coleyo, the Mayor’s Court minutes of August 23, 1785 corroborates this claim. Here, in a case involving the firm of Van Voorhis, Bayley, and Coley, their full names are given. A synopsis of the New York Mayor’s Court records will be published in a future issue of The Colonial Newsle

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 86 (Supplement)

    1/10/1990

    Highlight: defendants Ordered that the Sheriff return the venire and that the trail be brought on The Jury having withdrawn and being again returned to the bar say that they find for the plaintiffs 19 pounds, 19 shillings, 8 pence damages and 6 pence costs On Motion of Mr. Hamilton Ordered Judgement Jacob Delamontanie by John Loudon his guardian Vs Daniel Van Voorhis, Simon Alexander Bailey, and William Coley The sheriff returns William Coley taken the other defendants not found on like motion Ordered the like rules as to William Coley

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 115

    1/12/2000

    Highlight: coppers was used as a model by William Coleyich equals 160 grains, down to four pennyweight and sixteen grains, which totals 1 1 1 grains), then it follows the Vermont dies had to have been completed and shipped from New York City to the mint in Rupert, Vermont by October. Thus it is assumed the 1783-dated private coppers had been produced and imported into New York sometime around midyear or early summer, allowing Coley a few months to design and produce the

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    DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT

    DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT

    05/30/2004

    Highlight: DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v07n22a07.html

    The E-Sylum: Volume 7, Number 22, May 30, 2004, Article 7

    DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VISIT

    Don Coley writes: "On Monday May 24, I had the good
    fortune to be in the area on business and happened to have
    a few hours to visit the ANA in Colorado Springs. Of
    course, this is a great time to visit, as several world class
    dollar rarities such as the Dupont 1866 Dollar and the 1794
    Dollar that have recently been featured in the Numismatist
    are on display.

    Unfortunately, the library was closed on Monday.
    Disappointment turned into delight when I recognized
    Barbara Gregory telling the receptionist that she would be
    happy to come down and work on some editing in the

    The E-Sylum: Volume 7, Number 22, May 30, 2004, Article 7

    DAN COLEY'S ANA HEADQUARTERS VIS

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    C4 Title Index

    25/7/2017

    Highlight: Oliver V23 N1 Spring 15 5 Coley & Van Voorhis - Silversmiths Mayhugh, Marc VI 0 N1 Spring 02 21 Coley, Col. William: Honoring an American Hero McDowell, Christopher V24 N2 Summer 16 12 Coley, William: A Brief Bio of a Colonial Minter Mayhugh, Marc V20 N1 Spring 12 17 Collecting - What to do when you hit the "Brick Wall" Rock, Jeff V24 N4 Winter 2016 26 Collecting Colonial and Pre-Federal Coins Bonjour, Roy VII N2 Summer 03 8 Collecting Colonials, the passion for - internet gleanings from John Bolger & Ray Wms Syd Martin V21 N1 Spring 2013 46 Collecting Counterfeit British Halfpence by Die Sinker Legend Errors Moore, Roger & Morris Hankins V21 N2 Summer 13 22 collecting methods - What to do when you hit the wall - Part II Rock, Jeff V25 N1 Spring 1017 44 collecting methods - What to do when

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    C4 Title Index

    25/7/2017

    Highlight: & Coley 34 Vermont - Annotated "Coinage of New England" Williams, Ray VI 9 N2 Summer 11 4 Vermont - British & Nova Eborac Overstrikes at EAC 96 Wierzba, Mike V04 N2 Fall 1996 13 Vermont - C4 Supplement #1 - on the Rarest VTs - an experiment with another C4 venue Bonjour, Roy V13 N1 APRIL 05 Vermont - Cap't Thomas Machin & the last CT & VT Coppers McDowell, Christopher V20 N2 Summer 12 5 Vermont - Coley &

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    The C4 Newsletter, Spring 2002

    1/3/2002

    Highlight: Voorhis & Coley: Silversmiths By: MarcMayhugh In addition to occasionally turning up a rare and exciting coin, the online auction company of Ebay can also be an excellent source of numismatic related items such as books, newspapers, documents and other articles. One such item, recently purchased by the author, is a silver teaspoon manufactured by the silversmith firm of Daniel Van Voorhis and William Coleye wear and is a little banged up. Stamped on the backside of the spoon are the initials V&C inside a rectangle. The seller assures me that this mark was produced by the firm of Van Voorhis and Coley, and is

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    The C4 Newsletter, Summer 2004

    1/6/2004

    Highlight: suggesting that Van Voorhis and Coley were not only responsible for most of the Vermont and Machin coinage, but may also have produced the early Rahway New Jersey copper dies. Essentially, his theories attribute most of the work formerly thought to be that of James F. Atlee to Van Voorhis and Coley. He bases this on the fact that the Machin Indenture refers to Van Voorhis and Coley as silversmiths and does not mention Atlee as such. Sipsey also made a very interesting observation in noting that the touchemarks on Van Voorhis’ silverware are very similar to the lettering on the Vermont coins — a thought that deserves further investigation. With today’s technology, photographic overlays could probably prove or disapprove whether there is a similarity or not. And, while I don’t possess the

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 13

    1/10/1964

    Highlight: the other operated by Reuben Harmon and William Coley on Harmon's own property and stamping out Vermont coins with the head of George the Third facing right, the punches coming from their partner Daniel Van Voorhis. The die sinking may have been done by Coley, but more likely by Van Voorhis. The writer believes that Albion Cox moved to Rahway in mid-1786 to undertake the New Jersey coinage . This coinage was granted after extensive in-fighting between Matthias Ogden and Danial Marsh in the Assembly. After mutually beneficial arrangements were concluded 02) a bill was presented with the help of Johnathan Dayton and the device, according to this bill, required approval by one of the Supreme Court justices 05). It should be noted here that there were three Supreme Court justices at the time

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 66

    1/11/1983

    Highlight: William Coleys drawn up were quite extensive, indicating that the two firms expected to do a large and profitable business. Machin was to provide the minting house, the grist mill that he had erected in 1784 on Great Pond, for the New York firm, and the Vermont firm was to erect a minting house at Rupert, Bennington County, Vermont. Giles was to have charge of the writing and book-keeping; Harmon and Coley were to manage the Vermont firm; Machin and J.F.Atlee were to manage the New York firm; Grier was to be the cashier of the money coined at Rupert; Van Voorhis was to be cashier of the money coined at Machin's Mills; Grier and Jackson were to have the general management of the expenses and purchases

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 68

    1/7/1984

    Highlight: His partners were William Coley, also from Bennington County, Elias Jackson from Litchfield County, Connecticut, and Daniel Van Voorhis, a goldsmith from New York City. The articles of agreement between Machin's firm and Harmon's firm is also published in Crosby's The Early Coins of America. The agreement is very extensive, which suggests that the merged firms expected to do a large business in coining coppers. In summary the agreement stated that: (1) Reuben Harmon had been granted the privilege to coin copper from the Vermont Legislature. (2) Rueben Harmon and his partners agree to take Thomas Machin and his partners into full partnership to share in the benefits, privileges, and advantages of coinage for the State of Vermont. (3) They agreed that they would conduct their business in the

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