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    Flanagan's

    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 23

    Highlight: FLANAGAN’Sefore the coin was coun- terstamped. Deeply toned in mahogany and ebony, the obverse is well profiled with legible legends, while the reverse has just a few letters of the legend visible. Ford writes as the pedigree: “old safe deposit bos pre 1953.” From the John J. Ford, Jr. Collection. Paper envelopes with attribution and pedigree notation included. 21720 Pennsylvania — -Philadelphia. FLANAGAN’S / PUNCH / Punch Bowl / 112. N. 6TH ST on an 1775 Potosi 2 reales. Brunk F-241, Miller PA- 165A. Good Details — Holed

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: FATHER FLANAGAN’S Town for burial. Funeral services for the Boys Town Founder were held in the Dowd Memorial Chapel. The sarcophagus is sealed with a marble slab bearing the in- scription : FATHER FLANAGAN - FOUNDER OF BOYS TOWN LOVER OF CHRIST AND MAN July 13, 1886 - May 15, 1948 HOW BOYS TOWN IS SUPPORTED: Boys Town is supported entirely by voluntary contributions from people who believe in Father Flanagan’s philosophy that “THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A BAD BOY.” Boys Town has never received any sup- port from any church, or local, state or federal agency. BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF FATHER

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: FATHER FLANAGAN’S Town for burial. Funeral services for the Boys Town Founder were held in the Dowd Memorial Chapel. The sarcophagus is sealed with a marble slab bearing the in- scription : FATHER FLANAGAN - FOUNDER OF BOYS TOWN LOVER OF CHRIST AND MAN July 13, 1886 - May 15, 1948 HOW BOYS TOWN IS SUPPORTED: Boys Town is supported entirely by voluntary contributions from people who believe in Father Flanagan’s philosophy that “THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A BAD BOY.” Boys Town has never received any sup- port from any church, or local, state or federal agency. BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF FATHER

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: 11 Flanagan’sSan Francisco in 1915 (ANS). Seemingly weightless male and female figures are shown facing one another, each extends a hand to the other. In the background the sun is shin- ing and billowy clouds fill the sky. The symbolism of the figures, however, representing the union of the two seas between the Isthmus of Panama, was found questionable at the time. 12 Probably the most familiar of Flanagan’s medals are his portraits of artist friends, which he began in 1917 with the sculptor Paul Wayland Bartlett (fig. 8). Like Saint-Gaudens before him, Flanagan looked to his colleagues as subjects for his own work. His portraits, however, are

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    Copperhead Courier: Journal of the Civil War Token Society, vol. 19, no. 1-4

    1/3/1985

    Highlight: Flanagan’s Punch tokens (112 and 156 6th Street) were issued during that period (H & G 9341, 9342). The Fulds, while noting that these tokens were listed in 1858 by the Numismatic Society of Philadelphia, and so could not have been issued during the Civil War, could not bear to omit them from U.S. Civil War Store Cards , and so Flanagan’sare now also Fuld Pa 750J. J. D. Dewitt, in A Century of Campaign Buttons, lists a Flanagan counterstamp over a Zachary Taylor campaign token (ZT 1848-17). The 1848 dating of this token undoubtedly led to the inclusion of R. Flanagan’s Punch counterstamp (112 N. 6th St. only) over 2 reales in Rulau’s 1845-1860 Merchant Token book (Miller 165, 165B). Mr. Flanagan, who sold his punch in his tavern, which was part of his hotel at 112 N. 6th St.,

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: The Boys Town Times is published the second Friday of each month by Father Flanagan’shigh school athletic and intramural recreation program is directed by Maurice H. “Skip” Palrang, athletic director and head coach. Football teams have played from coast to coast. Other interscholastic sports in which Boys Town high school teams par- ticipate are basket ball, baseball, track, wrestling, swimming and tennis. WELFARE DEPARTMENT: Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home maintains a professional welfare staff, with qualified social

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: 11 Flanagan’sSan Francisco in 1915 (ANS). Seemingly weightless male and female figures are shown facing one another, each extends a hand to the other. In the background the sun is shin- ing and billowy clouds fill the sky. The symbolism of the figures, however, representing the union of the two seas between the Isthmus of Panama, was found questionable at the time. 12 Probably the most familiar of Flanagan’s medals are his portraits of artist friends, which he began in 1917 with the sculptor Paul Wayland Bartlett (fig. 8). Like Saint-Gaudens before him, Flanagan looked to his colleagues as subjects for his own work. His portraits, however, are

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    Copperhead Courier: Journal of the Civil War Token Society, vol. 19, no. 1-4

    1/3/1985

    Highlight: Flanagan’s Punch tokens (112 and 156 6th Street) were issued during that period (H & G 9341, 9342). The Fulds, while noting that these tokens were listed in 1858 by the Numismatic Society of Philadelphia, and so could not have been issued during the Civil War, could not bear to omit them from U.S. Civil War Store Cards , and so Flanagan’sare now also Fuld Pa 750J. J. D. Dewitt, in A Century of Campaign Buttons, lists a Flanagan counterstamp over a Zachary Taylor campaign token (ZT 1848-17). The 1848 dating of this token undoubtedly led to the inclusion of R. Flanagan’s Punch counterstamp (112 N. 6th St. only) over 2 reales in Rulau’s 1845-1860 Merchant Token book (Miller 165, 165B). Mr. Flanagan, who sold his punch in his tavern, which was part of his hotel at 112 N. 6th St.,

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: The Boys Town Times is published the second Friday of each month by Father Flanagan’shigh school athletic and intramural recreation program is directed by Maurice H. “Skip” Palrang, athletic director and head coach. Football teams have played from coast to coast. Other interscholastic sports in which Boys Town high school teams par- ticipate are basket ball, baseball, track, wrestling, swimming and tennis. WELFARE DEPARTMENT: Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home maintains a professional welfare staff, with qualified social

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: for a dining room to tbe Knickerbocker Hotel in New York Upon seeing this work in Flanagan s it to some of your houses, to marble or gilded bronze 1 think it would be swell" 6 Several years later Flanagan took a plaster cast of tbe head of the panel and made a reduction of it (fig, 6). Portrayed in a seducti ve manner with loose flowing hair and lips slightly parted, Aphrodite is the sculptor’s most impfessiotostjc work. Included among Flanagan’s many commissions for edm- ineinorative works is his medal for The Pennsylvania Society’

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: for a dining room to tbe Knickerbocker Hotel in New York Upon seeing this work in Flanagan s it to some of your houses, to marble or gilded bronze 1 think it would be swell" 6 Several years later Flanagan took a plaster cast of tbe head of the panel and made a reduction of it (fig, 6). Portrayed in a seducti ve manner with loose flowing hair and lips slightly parted, Aphrodite is the sculptor’s most impfessiotostjc work. Included among Flanagan’s many commissions for edm- ineinorative works is his medal for The Pennsylvania Society’

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    Arlie Slabaugh Collections

    Highlight: (G) Lot 382 (reduced in size) FLANAGAN’S SPECTACULAR VERDUN MEDAL, 1921. Baxter 330; Vermule 142. 102mm. Cast Bronze. John Flanagan, Sc. (MACO) XF/AU, with some minor marks near the obverse edge at 2:00 and 10:00. This is a bronze copy of the magnificent medallion presented in gold to the people of Verdun by the United States government in recog- 383. nition of the heroic defense of their city during World War I. Flanagan represents the Battle of Verdun as a struggle between two Michaelangeloesque male soldiers. The inscrip- tion, ILS/ NE PASSERONT/ PAS (They shall not pass!) was the order to the French troops by General Petain. On the reverse, Flanagan has depicted the medieval battlements of Verdun. Inscribed above in three lines: FROM THE PEO- PLE OF THE UNITED/ STATES TO THE CITY OF/

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    Charles Litman Collection of Hard Times Tokens

    Highlight: FLANAGAN’S SPECTACULAR VERDUN MEDAL, 1921. Baxter 330; Vermule 142. 102mm. Two lead filled electrotype copper shells with back plates. John Flanagan, Sc. (MACO) Choice Uncirculated. This is a copy of the magnificent medallion presented in gold to the people of Verdun by the United States government in recognition of the heroic defense of their city during World War I. Flanagan represents the Battle of Verdun as a struggle between two Michaelangeloesque male soldiers. The inscription, ILS/ NE PASSERONT/ PAS (They shall not pass!) was the order to the French troops by General Pctain. On the reverse, Flanagan has depicted the medieval battle- ments of Verdun. Inscribed above in three lines: FROM THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED/ STATES TO THE CITY OF/ VERDUN. Donna Hassler refers to this medal as

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    Benj Fauver Collections

    Highlight: the most compre- hensive discussion of Flanagan’seen this particular work and she replied, “Upon reviewing my research files on John Flanagan, I have identified the title of the sculptor’s galvano in question. Based on a photograph 1 have of a similar image (obverse) of a medal by Flanagan in the collection of the Musce d’Orsay, Paris, the galvano is titled: ‘Jeune femme’ or ‘Young woman.” According to Ms. Hassler, Flanagan’s first medals were executed in Paris at the turn of the century. She pictures two of them (por- traits of Mabel Clark and of Hortense Lenore Mitchell) which are clearly of the same genre. Ms. Hassler states

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    Auction Eighty-Two

    Highlight: JOHN FLANAGAN’Sdun as a struggle between two Michaelangeloesque male soldiers. The inscription, 1LS/ NE PASSERONT/ PAS (They shall not pass!) was the order to the French troops by General Petain. On the reverse, Flanagan has depicted the medieval battlements of Verdun. Inscribed above in three lines: FROM THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED/ STATES TO THE CITY OF/ VERDUN. Donna Hassler refers to this medal as Flanagan’s “most important 1 37 ★

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    Twenty-fifth catalogue of rare coins, tokens, medals, paper money, etc. [05/16/1936]

    Highlight: Flanagan’s Punch, 112 North 6th St. counterstamped on A Spanish 2 Real, 1789, bearing Punch Bowl, Ladle, etc, also the Small Flanagan’s Civil War Store Card. Ex.F. 2 Pcs. The Counterstamped Piece is Valued at $10.00. Very Rare Civil War Token, La Salle, Illinois, ]4 Cent. Issued by the Chamber of Commerce. The Smallest Denomination issued during the Civil War. Copper. Unc. Collection of Store Cards, nearly all same size of the large cent. Included are Some Rare Pieces as Follows 1 1785, Spanish 2 Real counterstamped A. Knight’s Mineral Water Saloon, 99 Balto St.; C. H. Slocomb, New Orleans, Hardware One Load, Brass Silvered; Bart & Hickcox, Cine., Ohio, Red Rubber, Oval Shape, etc. All Metals but Silver. Fine to Unc. 30 Diff. Pcs. The Best and Largest Lot of Store Cards we have Ever Offer-

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    The Numismatist, March 2017

    1/3/2017

    Highlight: Father Flanagan’s home for boys embraces its history and 100th anniversary. I N THE EARLY 2010s, Boys Town began to prepare for the 2017 centennial of its founding and revisited the idea of developing commem- orative items. A 4-cent Father Edward Flana- gan stamp had been issued by the U.S. Postal Service in 1986. And as the 100th anniversary ap- proached, the concept of producing a centennial medal or coin was raised. As part of this process, em- ployees and volunteers from the Leon Meyers Stamp Cen- ter of Boys Town were con- sulted about their knowledge of commemorative products. The Stamp Center is staffed by a part-time manager and ^ several volunteers, including I philatelic experts and one nu- I mismatist. Boys Town receives I donations of all types, among - them stamps, coins, pape

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    The Numismatist, March 2017

    1/3/2017

    Highlight: will be a highlight of the centennial celebration of Father Flanagan’sop) pictures Father Flanagan on the obverse, with a hand holding a sprouting acorn on the reverse. The silver $1 portrays a young girl seated under a tree on the obverse, with an active and engaged family playing under a sheltering oak on the reverse. commemorative coins, scheduled for Spring 2017, will be a highlight of the centennial celebration of Father Flanagan’s dream. Proceeds from the 100th- anniversary issues will advance the mission of assisting children and families in underserved communities across America. Indeed, the Father’s vision has been and continues to be manifested in the

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    The Winter 2014 Baltimore Auction, U.S. Coins

    Highlight: Counterstamps 3236 FLANAGAN’S PUNCH / (glass) / 112 . N. 6TH ST on an undated (1809-1821) Spanish Colonial 2 reales of Ferdinand VII. Brunk F-241, Miller-Pa 165 A. Host coin Fair. The counterstamp is clear and bold with a grade of Extremely Fine. Flanagan’s punch was the house drink at Vulcan’s Hall, the bar at Lyon’s Hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. From our (Stack’s) Brooklyn Sale, March 2007, lot 2256. Lot tag in- cluded. 3237 C. L. PAGE / ARTIST on an 1858 Liberty Seated half dollar. Brunk see P-67, Rulau-Unlisted. Host coin Fine. Prepared punch, and a small but very legible mark in the host’s right field. A neat artist’s mark, and an attractive piece overall. Page 40 Stack’s Bowers Galleries

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1883

    Highlight: of Flanagan’slmost heard asking, “ What am I Commissioner of Internal Revenue for, if not to iirovide for niy friends f” The excellent man is donhUess lost in consternation that the scatter-brained sentimentalists should he able to raise such a row over the steadj’-going old customs. We wonder that some esteemed contemporary of the daily press has not sent a “ coinmissiouer” to Texas to learn from Flanagan’s own lips what he thinks of the reform hill, and of the condemnation of Mr. Evans merely for turning ont honest and experienced and efficient officers to give their places to his own friends. We can bear the Texas statesman shouting In.stily, “ Why, what on

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    American Journal of Numismatics, Vol. 49

    1/1/1915

    Highlight: Flanagan’s Award Medal of the Exposition is what everybody acquainted with his other medals would expect, a beautiful piece of artis- tic work. The architectural type of the obverse, a class of subjects with which the medallist rarely succeeds, is certainly excellent. While the numismatist will find in the reverse type a composition happily suited to the round field of the medal and some beautifully modelled figures, yet, as in the case of the coin mentioned above, there is a question of the suitability of the allegorical figures and their attitude to symbol- ize the uniting of the two seas. Specially noteworthy among the works of the year are Mr. Bren- ner’s portrait plaque of Mr. Swasey and portrait medal of Mr. Samuel P. Avery, Mr. Spicer- Simson’s facing portrait of Mr. Charles Ira

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    The Clarion, vol. 15, no. 4

    1/12/1998

    Highlight: Although Flanagan’s work was inferior to Mrs. Fraser’s, his design has appeared on the Washing- ton quarter for the last 65 years. Recently, a proposal was adopted to issue a special series of quarters that will honor each of the 50 states. This might be a good time to reuiue Laura Fraser’s design for the Washington quarter. This has been “Money Talks.” Today’s program was written by Bill Jones and underwritten by Whitman Coin Products, a diuision of Golden Books, the leading publisher of coin reference books since 1941. “Money Talks” is a copyrighted production of the American Numismatic Assn., 818 North Cascade Auenue, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903, 719/632- 2646 ana @ money org, http: //www, money, org ************************************** - 22 -

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    The MCA Advisory, April 2005

    1/4/2005

    Highlight: beginning with John Flanagan’s Hudson-Fulton Medal of 1909. The series comprised 12 art medals, housed in uniform tan cloth- bound books offering essays, poems and writings relating to the medal topic, edited by DeKay. COE medals presented historic, commemorative and abstract artistic themes. Attracting some 550 members, COE faded away in 1915 after release of Allan G. Newman’s Joan of Arc Medal. Its membership brought together sculptors and arts patrons, leaders in education and industry. Among these was a wealthy New York collector and arts patron named George Dupont Pratt. 7

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    The MCA Advisory, October 2011

    1/10/2011

    Highlight: John Flanagan’s 1932 Aphrodite-Swift Runners is SOM issue 6. Deep red-brown with sea-green highlights is 6.1; glossy hematite red is 6.2; bright malachite green, 6.3. The exploration of the last SOM issues clarifies the little known, poorly publicized medals and reveals varieties down to the final medal, Geri Jimenez Gould’s 1995 Last Supper Plaquette, SOM 129, now known in no fewer than three edge varieties. Also listed are the Special Issues for SOM anniversaries and a few derivative pieces including Medallic Art’s medallic paperweights of the 1970’s. Each medal listed is accompanied by a biography of the artist, linking the medalist to the larger worlds of art and numismatics and reminding collectors of other works that the sculptor may have created. The artists’ own views of their

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: where they sat down and enjoyed one of Flanagan’s famous dinners. It was a beautiful autumn day, and the fourteen who took the trip enjoyed every minute of it, arriving home about 7 P. M. Mr. Merritt sent a specimen of the new design of 1917 quarter, and all agreed that it is a big improvement over the first design. A motion was made and carried that the Rochester Numismatic Asso- ciation purchase a $100 Liberty Bond. Mr. Clarke had with him at the meeting an interesting display of coins and bills. Meeting adjourned to Tuesday, November 6, 1917. Sigmi ni) Handler, Secretary. Hotel Rochester, Tuesday, November 6, 1917. 13 3rd meeting of the Rochester Numismatic Association called to order by Vice-President H. H. Yawger. Members present: Messrs. Woodbury, Plumb, Horner, Maunovry, L. G.

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: The plaquettes were by the Medallic Art Company which made many of Flanagan’s works. They were issued approximately in the same number and materials and sold at the same prices: Dana’s unique gold piece at $230; 12 silver pieces at $12; and 200 bronze at $2.60 each. 7 Dana’s library career began in Denver, Colorado; there he in- troduced new concepts, such as open book stacks so that visitors could browse freely. Use of the library rose dramatically and news of Dana’s innovations received wide notice. Although he had no formal training in the field, he was elected president of the American Library Association in 1895. He soon moved to Springfield, MA, where a large library functioned with museums of science and art. Dissatisfaction developed over the administration of the museums, and Dana

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: (Much of Flanagan’s correspondence was therefore with Miss Winser.) At Dana’s death, she became director and carried on his policies. Others on Dana’s staff were apprentices who learned the profession by working in all departments. Dorothy Dudley of the Apprentice Class of 1925/26, became a member of the Exhibits Department and was in charge of the “Medals Made in Newark” exhibition of 1928. With Dana as editor and coauthor, she also pro- Digitized by v Google Original from UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: An example is Flanagan’s The Detver medallion, a sketch for the reverse of the Essex Agricultural Socie- ty of Massachusetts medal, 5933 (fig. 3). 27 To support these artists was the responsibility of a public museum and although he said he could not understand modernism, Dana felt strongly that the new' styles should be shown at Newark: -. iii this world of change 1 am convinced that the institu- tions in my charge must see and feel and respond to the world's changes... there is always hope that the new is good and helpful and let us help it find itself. 2 * Also purchased early in 191 1 as a result of the 1.9 i 0 exhibitions were- 84 French medals costing S 220 These were almost entirely bronze copies from the Monnaie de Paris acquired through George E. Stechert of New York No doubt thes

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: Flanagan’s plaster models were, at his request, supplemented by bronze cliches and two steel dies from the Penn- sylvania Society itself (fig. 4). The artist asked that these bronze- proofs always be exhibited with his other medals and plaquettes and Digitized by Go 'gle Original from UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: 40 In conclusion: Dana’s theories regarding the use of medallic art can be illustrated by Flanagan’s Portrait ofProchaska (see above, fig. 5). The plaque lent by the artist to the American Numismatic Society’s 1910 exhibition had developed into a three-part “process exhibit” by 1927 when donated by him to the Newark Museum. On loan to the Society’s 1987-88 Beaux-Arts exhibition, these works 41 show Dana’s influence in an American museum dedicated to public education. 1 NM indicates The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ. All objects discussed are in its collections. All NM official publications were written or edited by John Cotton Dana unless indicated otherwise. Source material is in its files: letters, records pertaining to acquisitions and their documentation in the registrar’s department;

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: 9 Flanagan’s muscular figures were most likely inspired by Michelangelo’s powerful forms in the Sistine Chapel, which he saw on his trip to Italy. 10 A lifeline has been thrown to a man and woman floating in the water as jagged icebergs loom in the background. The date of the rescue is inscribed above. For the Proctor Award Medal of The Essex Agricultural Society Digitized by v Google Original from UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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    The Medal In America (COAC #4)

    /1988

    Highlight: unanimously selected Flanagan’s work. His design was chosen for its simplicity and innovative use of the motto even though it did not strictly conform to the committee’s suggestions. 14 In 1922 Flanagan received the prestigious J. Sanford Saltus Award from the American Numismatic Society in recognition of his artistic achievement in the field of medals. After working on several commissions for public sculpture, Flanagan remodeled Aphrodite for the obverse of a medal issued by the Society of Medalists in November 1932 (fig. 11). The god- dess of love now flirtatiously plays with a string of pearls, and her identity is clearly stated. The reverse depicts the Lampadedromy, a race run in ancient Greece to honor such gods as Prometheus, Athena, and Hephaestus. Two athletes are shown passing the

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    Mehl's Numismatic Monthly (vol. 8)

    1/1/1917

    Highlight: where they enjoyed one of Flanagan’s famous dinners. It was a beautiful autumn

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    The Evolution of Medal Collecting

    /2016

    Highlight: attractively priced example of John Flanagan’s School Art League medal listed in the “Ashtrays” category (figure 3). And just a few weeks ago I found a medal correctly listed in the “Medals” category, but without noting that it is a rare gilt bronze sample of the well- known Pulitzer Prize Medal (fig. 4). Even when an item is correctly listed and described, and attracts the attention of the “usual suspects”, it is still possible to get a relative bargain. This is due to the level playing field structure of eBay, where prices are usually set by multiple bidders starting at initial listing prices which are often very low. The ultimate sale price, then, is just a few dollars more than a legitimate underbidder’s top bid. In the traditional retail channels, a dealer may be tempted to price an

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    The Centinel, vol. 35, no. 2

    1/6/1987

    Highlight: 1984) or contact the author.) Nebraska’s Postal Notes Visitors to the CSNS convention in Omaha might be interested in visiting Father Flanagan’s Boys Town and their Philamatic Museum. In addition to numerous collections of stamps and coins, they have on display three Omaha Postal Notes. In fact, the three notes, two Type IVs and one Type V, are the only surviving Postal Notes from Nebraska’s largest city. Postal Note collectors know that Type I and Type V are the designs which most frequently survived. This was made possible by extra large numbers of notes saved by the public when they were first issued (Type I) and immediately prior to their demise (Type V). Types I and V comprise more than 60% of all the Postal Notes in modern collections. That generalization is accurate for all states

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    The Centinel, vol. 61, no. 2

    1/6/2013

    Highlight: the obverse features the John Flanagan’s classic 1932 portrait of George Washington. A ceremonial first quarter was presented to Alvarez, and the launch was made official by a “quarter pour” into a replica gunpow der chest. All of the young numismatists in attendance were given quarters and quarter holders to mark the day. After the quarter pour, the line was opened for people to buy $10 rolls of Philadelphia Mint Perry quarters. The Put-in-Bay branch of the First National Bank of Bellevue oversaw the exchange. Demand was high, and the bank reported exchanging 1,600 rolls of quarters during the afternoon. The line to obtain rolls stretched around the conference room several times, and ultimately there were not enough rolls to satisfy demand. An initial limit of 10 rolls per person was

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 22-23

    /1977

    Highlight: Brady Digitized by ington Before Boston” down to John Flanagan’s rendering on the cur- rent quarter dollar.** The inauguration of Washington in 1789 brought a second wave of requests for portraits. Elizabeth Johnston reports a iespectable tra- dition (which has still to be fully documented) that during the Pres- ident’s tour of New England he was asked to supply a profile likeness for a larger relief to be erected above the gate to the town common of Salem, Massachusetts. Through the agency of Benjamin Goodhue (1748- 1814), United States senator from Massachusetts, a “clearly drawn crayon profile colored in India ink” of Washington in civil dress was sent to Salem. 36 Still according to Johnston, Goodhue’s great-niece, Mrs. Nichols, rediscovered the drawing around 1861 together with the

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 14, no. 1

    1/3/2003

    Highlight: I speak of Michael Flanagan’s paper on the 1 892-micro O Barber half dollar. I look forward to reading Michael’s work. Dave Lawrence always remarked about the lack of varieties in the Barber series (something he reversed with his research ef- forts). The “micro O” has been around for decades and represents a potential over- continued on page 5 Page 4

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    Journal of the Barber Coin Collectors' Society, vol. 14, no. 4

    1/12/2003

    Highlight: Editor's note: Michael Flanagan’s article, ’’Tracking the Elusive 1892-0 ‘Micro O’ Half Dollar, ” can he found on page 15 of the Vol. 14, No. 1 Journal . Page 7

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    Copperhead Courier: Journal of the Civil War Token Society, vol. 12, no. 1-4

    1/3/1978

    Highlight: R9 192.50 Rich Hartzog 11*28-77 A very rare counterstamped token of Flanagan’s Punch. This one was on a 1787 Spanish Two Reals piece. PA. 985A-la, CR9, Part Red Unc 1840.00 Rich Hartzog 11-28-77 This is the very rare watch check from (Wilkes-Barre?). This has to be the record price for a Civil War token. It is higher than the Genesse Station piece from Wis. has ever sold for. With a $1,000.00 estimate, this token sur- passed all other pieces in Rich’s auction. TN. 600B-8a, CR6, Brown Unc 137.50 Rich Hartzog 1 1-28-77 This better piece was a steal at this price. Most Tennessee pieces bring much higher than this. WI. 45A-lb, BR9, Unc 192.50 Rich Hartzog 11-28-77 This is the tough town of Baraboo piece with a Lincoln Rev. 125/432 BRIO 95.70 Rich Hartzog 11-28-77 An unlisted metal & a better

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    Copperhead Courier: Journal of the Civil War Token Society, vol. 19, no. 1-4

    1/3/1985

    Highlight: FLANAGAN’S PUNCH 1835-58 none 750JA FOX’S CASINO none none 750K J. HENRY GERCKE 1861? none NC-14 J. HENRY GERCKE not searched none 750M F & L LADNER 1864-67 1863 750N A. LAMBERT 1863-64 none 750 0 H. MULLIGAN 1858-63 none C.H. NEEDLES 1855-83 none 750P F.P. ROGERS 1860-66 1863 750Q G.J.RUELIUS 1863-67 1863 750R G. A. SCHWARTZ 1861-63 1864 750S STEPPACHER 1862-67 1863 750T GRANVILLE STOKES 1862-65 none 750U A.B.TAYLOR 1861-66 1861 NC-24 A. B. TAYLOR 1861-66 none NC-23 A.B.TAYLOR 1856-60 1860 750V N & G TAYLOR 1860-66 1863 750A TON HALL 1861 none unlisted E. IVINS 1861 none (Miller Pa 231, 231A, 232, 233, 233A) (1789) As a result of this study, we believe that Pa NC-24 and the Ivins storecard (Pa 231) are true CTWs. In contrast, Pa 750H, Pa 750K (wrong address in 1861) and Pa 750 JA are

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    Copperhead Courier: Journal of the Civil War Token Society, vol. 19, no. 1-4

    1/3/1985

    Highlight: there are two distinct periods that Flanagan’s punch could have been sold from 112 N. 6th Street, Philadelphia, namely, 1835-41 and 1846-58. Let us suggest, the, that 112/156 N. 6th St. tokens were issued in 1858. This is the only year that Flanagan could have been at both addresses and appear in the 1858 Numismatic Society list. The 2 reale coun- terstamped tokens were likely issued before 1858, perhaps as early as 1835-41. THE 6ENER1L STORE WANTED, Fuld, 295A-la R-5 Franklin, Indiana, and other Indiana Civil War tokens. Cash or trade. Ron Parrott, 301 E. Monroe St., Franklin, IN 46131. WANTED — N.Y. city C.W.C.S.s for my collection. Describe and price. Will buy or trade for? Thanks Rand, Box 1267, Woodhaven, NY 11421. FREE PRICELIST! My latest list contains several pages of: Civil War

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    The Civil War Token Journal, vol. 38, no. 1-4

    1/3/2004

    Highlight: We even have the comment on a Flanagan”s punch token of Philadelphia that copper is preferable to paper. Wartime greed and the fleecing of the government is found on dies 97/ 389. ( A perfect rendition of the age of "shoddy".) The use of the word "federal" is utilized on some tokens with the thought of combatting the concept of "states rights". Die 467 goes far in establishing a national government. "United States of America" is found on some tokens as we were at the time anything but united. The flag of our Union says a great deal pertaining to secession as it ignores the flags of the Confederacy. Another favorite is the 13 intertwined links forming a complete circle (Union) first used in 1776, which was just as important then as in the 1860's to reinforce the concept of an unbroken chain

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 36, No. 6 (213)

    15/11/2002

    Highlight: but also liked Phil Flanagan’s comment of the use of the Liberty Cap “logo” on membership cards and the from of each Penny-Wise issue. Because EAC does not endorse commercial interests, the club would need to ensure that any logo is not used in third-party auction catalogs, and does not accompany any item for sale in such a way that implies EAC approval or inspection. EAC is a non-profit organization focused on research and education. EAC could find itself crossing a line the club hadn’t intended to cross if the logo was used in a commercial sense. Jon favored members sending in suggestions for a logo. He also stated the club would need to adopt usage guidelines if a logo is adopted. Any EAC member with a legal background may want to comment on this matter. After three weeks, Mark Hayes

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    Calcoin News, vol. 23, no. 1

    1/1/1969

    Highlight: Flanagan’s Punch; Sachem Oyster Saloon. One of the most interesting is — Kunkel’s Opera Troupe, which ap- pears on a Spanish 2 reales of 1744. George J. Kunkel was one of the first delineators of negro minstrelsy in the U.S. and during his theatrical career was identified with three historic the- aters in Baltimore. John Wilkes Booth and Joe Jefferson were in his company. Many of these pieces have exciting histories or are associated with well known names in numismatics. The ‘E.B.’ stamped on a 1799 dollar is the mark of Ephraim Brasher, famous in numismatics for the Ephraim Brasher doubloon, one of the world’s rarest coins. One of the rarest Hawaiian items is the counterstamp on a U.S. half dollar of 1872 of the Thomas Hobron Hawai- ian Token. It is believed unique and was originally in

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    The TNA News, January-Febrary 2014

    1/1/2014

    Highlight: John Flanagan s Washington Quarter (1932 -present) design took to the skies from Mount Vernon and traced its flight path along the routes that Lewis Sc Clark used to cross the vast wildness of North America in honor of the Father of our nation 200th Anniversary of his birth. Our next national eagle design holds a rather unique placed in history. John R. Sinnock s Franklin Half Dollar (1948-1963) started out as a way to honor one of America s Founding Fathers and elder statesman and ended with the tragic assassination of President Kennedy. Due to a Treasury Department oversight, it is also the smallest eagle to take flight on our national currency. Unfortunately, our next numismatic eagle took flight under the cloud of a national tragedy - Lee Harvey Oswald s assassination of our 35th

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 1, 1950-1951

    /1950

    Highlight: Curator Father Flanagan’s Boys* Home Boys Town, Nebraska Dear Sir: Receipt is acknowledged of your letter of July 19, 1951. Mr. Newman is on vacation at present and I will bring your letter to his attention whenhe returns to the city. Very truly yours Secretary to Eric P. Newman atb

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: Curat or Father Flanagan’s Boys Hone Boys Town, Nebraska Dear Mr# Barrett: The material which I placed on loan in your nuseun has been there quite a while and I merely wish to remind you that it might be worth while to substitute material of someone else so as to :ceep the material changing# ivory now and then I try to put ny hand3 on some of the items I have loaned you and then realise they are on exhibit# If you wish sheets, one of the largest collections of sheets in the country is owned by Mr# Frank Sprinkle, lox 809, luefield, West Virginia, who, perhaps, nay be very pleased to lend you these sheets# He has some very unusual ones# You may mention ny name if you care to# Post of ny time has been spent in writing and the American Numismatic Society will put out a monograph this winter

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: Curator Father Flanagan’s Boys' Horae Boys Town, Nebraska Dear Wren : This is a report on the copper plate. After visiting six engravers they told me that the only people capable of doing this kind of work were buried in the cemetery and that there was no press in the City of St. Louis capable of doing it. As a desperate measure I called up the Art Museum and asked if they knew anyone who could do the work. They told me to go to Washington University and inquire of the art instructor. In the base- ment of the art instructor's home he has an app- ropriate press. We made one print together, whioh I have, and it is lovely. I ordered rag paper and the professor said there would be some delay. He is now teach- ing art at Notre Dame University, for the summer, and in the fall will complete the

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    Boys Town Correspondence, File 3, 1955-1988

    /1955

    Highlight: Founded Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home, December 10, 1917. Director, December 10, 1917, to May 15, 1948. Pope Pius XI on October 23, 1937, named him a Domestic Prelate with the title of Right Reverend Monsignor. The motion picture “BOYS TOWN ” was made to portray the work of Father Flanagan and his Boys Town in 1938. Second Boys Town film, MEN OF BOl S TOWN, produced in 1941. Helped establish Boy Scout movement in Omaha. President of the Omaha Welfare Board for 10 years. Received the first Humanitarian award from Variety Clubs of America in

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