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    July 25, 1837

    SELECTIONS FROM THE POGUE COLLECTION, PART V

    03/12/2017

    Highlight: was first struck on July 25, 1837. "I have the pleasure to send you herewith 20 half dimes of the new emission," Mint Director Robert Maskell Patterson wrote to Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury that day. "You will see that they are fair similes of the new dimes." Walter Breen suggested that all 20 pieces were Proofs, though the letter does not specify. PCGS has certified an 1837 Proof on 10 occasions, though this figure is undoubtedly greater than the number of discrete specimens they've seen.

    Pittman had a great eye and sense of value - his purchases of early proof coins were the bargain of the last century. These are important and very rare coins. -Editor

    To read the complete lot description, see:

    Where to start? I've had the Pogue V catalog on my desk for a couple weeks now

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    Gobrecht Journal #1

    15/12/1974

    Highlight: and on July 25, 1837 some 20 Proofs were struck, commemo- rating the inception of the new design. One of these was placed by Adam Eckfeldt into what would the next year be officially named the Mint Cabinet Collection, now on indefinite loan at the Smithsonian Institution. Others went to the Secretary of Treasury for presentation to a variety of VIPs; at least a dozen are traceable today, some of them evidently kept as pocket pieces long enough to have acquired nicks and scratches. As usual with new designs, many of the little coins were saved by the general public as novelties, and Uncirculated specimens are available for a price. During the remainder of the year, a total of 1,405,000 were struck from apparently four pairs of dies. The first obverse has date in a curved line with tall

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    The Clarion, vol. 5, no. 1

    1/4/1988

    Highlight: V July 25 , 1837 , .Vo. Treasurer. Figure 11: T urnpike Company Note Summary The odd denominations of many early Pittsburgh notes are enduring reminders of the city’s roots. They are a direct link to centuries past, traceable to our ancestors’ British origins and their extensive trade with the Spanish world. These odd denominations still haunt us today. Nearly two hundred years after the introduction of the decimal system of money in America, stock quotations are still listed in terms of 1/8 dollars, a throwback to the Spanish real or "bit". In Allegheny County, the 6 1/4 cent denomination continues to puzzle workers in the Criminal Division of the Court of Common Pleas. A rubber stamp, used daily, records a fine of 6 1/4 cents, assessed to each prisoner at sentencing. The fine is no longe

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    E-Gobrecht, vol. 4, no. 1

    1/1/2008

    Highlight: On July 25, 1837, some few dozen proof half dimes were distributed to Mint personnel in their celebration of the first successful run of this denomination on the new Seated design. I find this to be a rather inspir- ing piece of historical information to tie to this key coin. If you have the wherewithal and the cour- age of your convictions, do not think twice if one of these is offered near double sheet. I feel that all Seated proofs dated before 1854 are dramatically undervalued, especially this one and that discussed below. 4. 1837 No Stars 10c. Proof. OH YES ! This is pegged as the first dime to ever appear with the word DIME on it! A similar argument applies here as for the 1837 No Stars half dime, with an added flair or two. The release date of this dime was June 30, 1837, nearly a

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    Gobrecht Journal #1

    15/12/1974

    Highlight: and on July 25, 1837 some 20 Proofs were struck, commemo- rating the inception of the new design. One of these was placed by Adam Eckfeldt into what would the next year be officially named the Mint Cabinet Collection, now on indefinite loan at the Smithsonian Institution. Others went to the Secretary of Treasury for presentation to a variety of VIPs; at least a dozen are traceable today, some of them evidently kept as pocket pieces long enough to have acquired nicks and scratches. As usual with new designs, many of the little coins were saved by the general public as novelties, and Uncirculated specimens are available for a price. During the remainder of the year, a total of 1,405,000 were struck from apparently four pairs of dies. The first obverse has date in a curved line with tall

    Read more

    The Clarion, vol. 5, no. 1

    1/4/1988

    Highlight: V July 25 , 1837 , .Vo. Treasurer. Figure 11: T urnpike Company Note Summary The odd denominations of many early Pittsburgh notes are enduring reminders of the city’s roots. They are a direct link to centuries past, traceable to our ancestors’ British origins and their extensive trade with the Spanish world. These odd denominations still haunt us today. Nearly two hundred years after the introduction of the decimal system of money in America, stock quotations are still listed in terms of 1/8 dollars, a throwback to the Spanish real or "bit". In Allegheny County, the 6 1/4 cent denomination continues to puzzle workers in the Criminal Division of the Court of Common Pleas. A rubber stamp, used daily, records a fine of 6 1/4 cents, assessed to each prisoner at sentencing. The fine is no longe

    Read more

    E-Gobrecht, vol. 4, no. 1

    1/1/2008

    Highlight: On July 25, 1837, some few dozen proof half dimes were distributed to Mint personnel in their celebration of the first successful run of this denomination on the new Seated design. I find this to be a rather inspir- ing piece of historical information to tie to this key coin. If you have the wherewithal and the cour- age of your convictions, do not think twice if one of these is offered near double sheet. I feel that all Seated proofs dated before 1854 are dramatically undervalued, especially this one and that discussed below. 4. 1837 No Stars 10c. Proof. OH YES ! This is pegged as the first dime to ever appear with the word DIME on it! A similar argument applies here as for the 1837 No Stars half dime, with an added flair or two. The release date of this dime was June 30, 1837, nearly a

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    The TNA News, January-Febrary 2013

    1/1/2013

    Highlight: Variety 1 (No Stars on Obverse) This design went into production on July 25, 1837 with the minting of 20 proof pieces. Lady Liberty faces the left on the obverse of the coin. She is sitting on a rock or stone pedestal holding the shield of the United States which has a scroll bearing the legend LIBERTY draped across it. Lady Liberty is wearing a chiton which is a long, flowing tunic typically worn by men and women of ancient Greece. Variety 1: No Stars on Obverse The reverse design consists of a wreath composed of two stems of laurel sprays, with 14 leaves and six berries each, joined at the bottom with a bow. The legend HALF DIME is in the middle and the legend UNITED STATE of AMERICA appears around the outer field. These coins TNA News January/February 2013 16

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    Brussels Collection: Paper Money of North America

    Highlight: 60 sous July 25. 1837 and Sefton and Beaudet. 30 sous July 8. 1837. VG with some tears and edge damage. The last note is not listed by Charlton. 3 Pcs. Felix Plante 6,12 and 15 sous Aug. 9, 1837. VF to EF. some with yellow stains. Unsigned and unnumbered. 3 Pcs. — 20,30 and 60 sous Aug. 9. 1 837. VF to EF. some with yellow stains. The 30 sous is signed and numbered and is rare as such 3 Pcs. Francois Plante. 30 pence (I ecu) Sept. 1, 1837. (AU; unsigned and unnumbered) and David Smart $‘4 Mar. 21,1 839 (VG). The latterdate is unlisted in Charlton. 1 Pcs. (Estimate) (60.00) (60.00) (60.00) (60.00) (60.00) (95.00) ( 100 . 00 ) (1750.00) (250.00) ( 200 . 00 ) (75.00) (50.00) (150.00) (150.00) (50.00) ( 100 . 00 ) (90.00) (125.00) (75.00) — 67 —

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    U.S. Gold, Silver & Copper Coins

    Highlight: One of 20- 25 pieces struck on July 25, 1837, to mark the introduction of this new design on the Half Dimes. Breen listed 7 specimens, and had seen others. We feel that about a dozen still survive, including some badly cleaned examples. This speci- men, which has the longest pedigree of any, is certainly one of the finest known. Ex A.NA. Convention Sale (Superior), lot 154, August 1975; previously from the Gilhousen Sale (Superior), lot 166, October 1973; Dr. Charles L. Ruby; California State Numismatic Society Sale (Kabealo), lot 243, April 1949. — 19 —

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    United States Gold, Silver and Copper Coins

    Highlight: one of 20 made on July 25, 1837 to celebrate inception of the new design. . . this ‘carries its own credentials’ despite one small contact mark just below terminal leaf on left branch.” In custom lucite holder, accompa- nied by photocopy of Breen letter. Lot No. 135 135 1837 No Stars, Large Date. Another Brilliant Proof, close to choice. This tiny jewel boasts a razor-sharp strike, peaked 1 and double-cut 8 in the date. The fields show the hairlines that are so common on early Proofs. The late Walter Breen estimated that perhaps as many as 20 Proofs were struck. NGC PF62. 136 1837 No Stars. Brilliant Uncirculated, on the very cusp of choice. Meticulous strike, colorful iridescent blue and russet-gold toning combine for maximum visual appeal. 137 1837 No Stars. Another. Brilliant

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    Numismatic Images on American Paper Currencies, The Lawrence R. Stack Collection

    Highlight: July 25, 1837. Very Fine. Fully issued note. Moderate format size scrip note. Imprint of Imprimerie de Louis Perrault, a Montreal. French and English texts. Top center. Capped Bust Half Dollar reverse. Denomination in left panel. Rarity 6 (six to 10 known). A rare issuer and the only example in the collection. The grade is excellent and this is an important note for the Canadian scrip note specialist. Ex TOREX Sale (Moore's Numismatic Auctions, Inc., February 24-26, 2005, lot 1086); Robert A. Vlack Collection Superb Jouliette Half Dollar Vignetted Scrip h IL LU. S u ’ iJan, par ' ^ pc ' 17ji Sen- HoJf a DoUbiT. s r : ir > 4514 B. Jouliette, St. Paul de Lavaltrie, Lower Canada. Un Ecu or Half a Dollar. November 20, 1838. Choice Almost Uncircu- lated. Fully issued note. Moderate format size

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    Numismatic Images on American Paper Currencies, The Lawrence R. Stack Collection

    Highlight: July 25, 1837. Very Good. Eully issued note. Moderate format size scrip. Imprint of Imprimerie de Louis Perrault, a Montreal. Erench and English text. At top center, Spanish Colonial Real reverse. Ornate end panels. Rarity 7 (one to five known) or at worst a High Rarity 6. Not in the Vlack Collection and the only note of the issuer in this collection. Honest wear with some thins and petty edge nicks. This is the final note in the largest offering of these Canadian scrip notes since perhaps the days of New Netherlands Coin Co. Ex TOREX Sale (Moore's Numismatic Auctions, Inc., June 24-27, 2004, lot 1034). SHARE AND BOND CERTIFICATES Morgan Dollar Obverse on Arkansas Bond 4527 American Building & Loan Association, Little Rock, Arkansas. $300 [Written Denomination] Coupon Bond. August 22, 1932

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    75th Anniversary Sale

    Highlight: Perhaps 20 Proofs exist from this tiny initial striking of these on July 25, 1837, and most were given out to dignitaries or other special friends of the mint. Minor hairlines account for the grade which come and go when tilted under a light, and the reverse has a bit of hazy patina on that side. PCGS has only graded 10 examples of these in Proof, confirming the tremendous rarity of this two year type coin and initial strikings of the denomination by Christian Gobrecht. An important and historical coin for the specialist. PCGS Population: 3; 6 finer (Proof-67 finest). #4407 - 78 -

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part V

    Highlight: was first struck on July 25, 1837. “I have the pleasure to send you herewith 20 half dimes of the new emission,” Mint Director Robert MaskeU Patterson wrote to Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury that day. “You will see that they are fair similes of the new dimes.” Walter Breen suggested that all 20 pieces were Proofs, though the letter does not specify. PCGS has certified an 1837 Proof on 10 occasions, though this figure is undoubtedly greater than the number of discrete specimens they’ve seen. This coin traces its provenance to two of the most re- markable cabinets of early American Proof coins ever as- sembled. The Phil Kaufman Collection, sold in 2007, was deemed by early Proof expert John Dannreuther to be both the finest and most complete ever assembled, surpassing even the Mint’s own

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part V

    Highlight: for presentation to Treasury officials and otherVIPs.” A July 25, 1837 letter presenting a small group of new half dimes to the Treasury Secretary does mention that dimes had already been produced and calls the new half dimes “fine similes of the new dimes.” The June 30, 1837 date for initial distribution of new dimes is likely correct, and those new dimes could well have been Proofs, but confirming either of those likelihoods as facts is perhaps impossible. Were it not for the reducing lathe technology that Franklin Peale brought to the Philadelphia Mint after 1835, it would have been well nigh impossible to create such a diminutive example of Christian Gobrecht’s enduring No Stars design. The hubs for Seated Liberty dimes such as this were made in perfect proportion to their dollar

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    Kagin's 1987 Atlanta Sale

    Highlight: Apparently one of the nine or 10 survivors of the 20 proofs struck on July 25, 1837. Triple cutting on the 8 is diagnostic. A rare type issue in proof and certainly in demand. Dark blue-steel color and attractive. — Capped Bust, 1829-1837 — Very Rare 1829 Proof Half Dime 1437 1829 V-7, PF-64, near Gem. This proof, with the distinctive reverse with scroll beginning under E of UNITED, was reported as the only one seen by Breen, the former Brand- New Netherlands coin. Although this may be the same piece, we assume this to be the second one known. Simply a magnificent specimen. 1438 Pair of half dimes, both 1829, from different dies. One is AU-50/55 with original toning, the other is EF-40. (2 pieces) 1439 Lot of two. 1830 EF-45 and perhaps better but with two small pits above Liberty's head

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