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    Pacific & company

    Numismatic Gallery Monthly [vol. 4, no. 1]

    1/1/1951

    Highlight: Very fine and extremely rare (Sold) $5500.00 PACIFIC COMPANY San Francisco — 1849 (Exact information on this company is not avail- able. A Virginia firm called the "Pacific Mining and Trading co." headed for California early in 1849. Another group, "The Pacific Company," left Boston a few months earlier. Edgar H. Adams stated that he believed the firm of Broderick and ohler producel these coins. Al are extremely rare.) 93 — $1.00. 1849. Liberty cap amid rays and stars, 1 DOLLAR below/Eagle. PACIFIC COMPANY CALIFORNIA 1849. There is o hole near the edge through O in DOLLAR. Apparently it is not an easy task to obtain a better specimen for both Raymond and Whitman illustrate this identical coin, hole and all (Sold) $1500.00 94 — $5.00. 1849. Weight 129.3 grs. Similar design. A splendid,

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    Numismatic Gallery Monthly [vol. 4, no. 1]

    1/1/1951

    Highlight: Very fine and extremely rare (Sold) $5500.00 PACIFIC COMPANY San Francisco — 1849 (Exact information on this company is not avail- able. A Virginia firm called the "Pacific Mining and Trading co." headed for California early in 1849. Another group, "The Pacific Company," left Boston a few months earlier. Edgar H. Adams stated that he believed the firm of Broderick and ohler producel these coins. Al are extremely rare.) 93 — $1.00. 1849. Liberty cap amid rays and stars, 1 DOLLAR below/Eagle. PACIFIC COMPANY CALIFORNIA 1849. There is o hole near the edge through O in DOLLAR. Apparently it is not an easy task to obtain a better specimen for both Raymond and Whitman illustrate this identical coin, hole and all (Sold) $1500.00 94 — $5.00. 1849. Weight 129.3 grs. Similar design. A splendid,

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    The Brasher Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 2

    1/6/1999

    Highlight: also owned the Pacific Company came up with the following points: 1 . Approximate weight is 55 grains - silver, possibly struck over a Mexican 2 real piece, which was clipped or shaved at the edges, accounting for the non- uniform or uneven shape of about 22x23 MM in diameter. 2. Being a pattern or trial piece in appearance, it was first struck with obverse dies (on both sides of the piece) of the $5.00 Pacific Company. 3. Then, restruck as a trial piece again, except, with the obverse die of the $5.00 Cincinnati Mining and Trading of 1849. This being over the obverse strike of the $5.00 Pacific Company “CINCI” are still visible. 4. Again, the coin was restruck on the other obverse $5.00 Pacific Company die strike,

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    The Brasher Bulletin

    1/7/2014

    Highlight: are: >1849 Pacific Company gold $5 coin, cataloged in the 1981 book as Kagin 1. Professional Coin Grad- ing Service About Uncirculated 58, $763,750. The coin last sold at auction March 1. 1980, by Bowers & Ruddy for $180,000. when it was offered uncerti- fied. w ith a grade identified by the auction firm as Very Fine 30. David J. McCarthy, senior numismatist and researcher at Kagin's said April 28 the Pacific $5 piece should have easily been a $1 million coin. >1849 Mormon gold $10 coin. Kagin 3, Numismatic Guaranty Corp. AU-58. $705,000. Last sold at auc- tion Jan 1, 1984. by Stack's for $132,000. when it was offered uncertified as AU-55. >1851 Baldwin & Co. gold $20 coin, Kagin 5. PCGS Extremely Fine 45. $646,250. Last sold at auction for $1 10.000 March 1. 1980. by Bowers & Ruddy from

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: Pacific Company, and Cincinnati Mining and Trading Co. An observation of known characteristics common to Broderick & Kohler minting, which also are characteristics of coins bearing these latter three names, should indicate at least a possibility that Broderick and Kohler issued those coins. As previously mentioned, Broderick and Kohler probably produced coins in denominations of $5 and $10, and Broderick hand-stamped his com- pany’s coins. O’Meara, in his book, Broderick and Gwin, makes mention that Broderick and Kohler coins were worth only $4 and $8 respectively. Evidently the company purchased gold at prevailing prices of $14 to $16 an ounce, thereby making a profit of about 25 percent. This fact is supported by an Alta California article written three years later, and also by Adams

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    The Brasher Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 2

    1/6/1999

    Highlight: also owned the Pacific Company came up with the following points: 1 . Approximate weight is 55 grains - silver, possibly struck over a Mexican 2 real piece, which was clipped or shaved at the edges, accounting for the non- uniform or uneven shape of about 22x23 MM in diameter. 2. Being a pattern or trial piece in appearance, it was first struck with obverse dies (on both sides of the piece) of the $5.00 Pacific Company. 3. Then, restruck as a trial piece again, except, with the obverse die of the $5.00 Cincinnati Mining and Trading of 1849. This being over the obverse strike of the $5.00 Pacific Company “CINCI” are still visible. 4. Again, the coin was restruck on the other obverse $5.00 Pacific Company die strike,

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    The Brasher Bulletin

    1/7/2014

    Highlight: are: >1849 Pacific Company gold $5 coin, cataloged in the 1981 book as Kagin 1. Professional Coin Grad- ing Service About Uncirculated 58, $763,750. The coin last sold at auction March 1. 1980, by Bowers & Ruddy for $180,000. when it was offered uncerti- fied. w ith a grade identified by the auction firm as Very Fine 30. David J. McCarthy, senior numismatist and researcher at Kagin's said April 28 the Pacific $5 piece should have easily been a $1 million coin. >1849 Mormon gold $10 coin. Kagin 3, Numismatic Guaranty Corp. AU-58. $705,000. Last sold at auc- tion Jan 1, 1984. by Stack's for $132,000. when it was offered uncertified as AU-55. >1851 Baldwin & Co. gold $20 coin, Kagin 5. PCGS Extremely Fine 45. $646,250. Last sold at auction for $1 10.000 March 1. 1980. by Bowers & Ruddy from

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: Pacific Company, and Cincinnati Mining and Trading Co. An observation of known characteristics common to Broderick & Kohler minting, which also are characteristics of coins bearing these latter three names, should indicate at least a possibility that Broderick and Kohler issued those coins. As previously mentioned, Broderick and Kohler probably produced coins in denominations of $5 and $10, and Broderick hand-stamped his com- pany’s coins. O’Meara, in his book, Broderick and Gwin, makes mention that Broderick and Kohler coins were worth only $4 and $8 respectively. Evidently the company purchased gold at prevailing prices of $14 to $16 an ounce, thereby making a profit of about 25 percent. This fact is supported by an Alta California article written three years later, and also by Adams

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    The Collection of Samuel J. Berngard & Treasure Coins of the S.S. New York

    Highlight: New York Rare 1849 Pacific Company $5 Gilt Copper Die Trial 2232 1849 Pacific Company $5. K-4 for similar type. Rarity-7+. Gilt copper die trial. VF-30 (PCGS). Reeded edge. Medium honey gold with some olive surface highlights, and with deep orange highlights in the protected peripheral regions. Some scattered marks present, none of them visually offensive or apt to sway bidding judgment when it crosses the auction block. Some central weakness on the obverse eagle is noted, more a consequence of circulation than strike; all of the details are crisp. The classic cap and rays reverse style, used here and on certain gold dollar pat- terns of the 1830s, saw especially extensive use during the early days of the Mexican Republic. Yet another grand opportunity for an advanced specialist to improve

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 44 - 45

    1/1/1910

    Highlight: It is quite probable that the coins of the Pacific Company were hand- struck, which explains the reference above to Broderick’s arduous labors with the sledge-hammer. This method was utilized at some of the other private mints, such, for instance, as that of the Ormsby establishment, which operated at Sacramento at about the same time. At the 1884 Levick sale a Ten Dollar gold-piece of the Pacific Companyn fine condition, would seem, judging from the photograph, to have been produced by a blow of the hammer. Taking into consideration all the circumstances, it seems almost certain that the Pacific Company coins were made by Broderick & Kohler. This firm undoubtedly struck Five and Ten Dollar pieces, yet there is no specimen known showing either the name of Broderick &

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 44 - 45

    1/1/1910

    Highlight: It is quite probable that the coins of the Pacific Company were hand- struck, which explains the reference above to Broderick’s arduous labors with the sledge-hammer. This method was utilized at some of the other private mints, such, for instance, as that of the Ormsby establishment, which operated at Sacramento at about the same time. At the 1884 Levick sale a Ten Dollar gold-piece of the Pacific Companyn fine condition, would seem, judging from the photograph, to have been produced by a blow of the hammer. Taking into consideration all the circumstances, it seems almost certain that the Pacific Company coins were made by Broderick & Kohler. This firm undoubtedly struck Five and Ten Dollar pieces, yet there is no specimen known showing either the name of Broderick &

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    Public auction of an outstanding collection of United States and foreign coins. [03/18-21/1964]

    Highlight: PACIFIC COMPANY THE 1849 PACIFIC COMPANY TEN DOLLAR I ■ I , I , ' ' I 2210 $10 Obverse, An eagle, with outspread wings, its head turned defiantly to the left; the talons hold an olive branch. Around the border PACIFIC COMPANY, CALIFORNIA. Below is the date in large figure, 1849. Reverse: In the center of the field, a liberty cap, from which spring ten rays, between each of which are 3 stars, making a total of thirty. Below is the denomination, 10 DOLLARS, the figures being large and out of proportion to the word DOLLARS. There are only 4 or 5 specimens known to exist and this, the Virgil M. Brand spec- imen is an Extremely Fine coin. At a public auction the Newcomer specimen sold at 8,000.00 to Williams and was resold in 1951 for 12,500.00. This was the rarest and most expensive single

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    The Numismatist, June 2006

    1/6/2006

    Highlight: 1: Pacific Company 1849, California. $ 1.00 struck in Silver over a United States Half Dime of the Liberty Seated design. Uncirculated. Ex. Lot 90, Clifford Sale, 1982. $150,000.00 No. 2: Pacific Company 1849, California. Silver $2.50. Uncirculated being gilt at time of striking. Close examination reveals the possibility of being a very low grade gold alloy. Specific gravity indicates silver, but it is very common for many pioneer gold coins to have been manufactured with a low quality of gold mixed with silver. If a pioneer gold coin had a low ratio of 8.75 to 1 .25 silver in the composition, the coin was considered a gold coin. Ex. Lot 92, Clifford Sale, 1982. P.O.R. In recent years a Pacific Co. "Silver Pattern" sold at public auction in New York City was catalogued as gilt. The coin

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    The August 2015 Chicago ANA Auction Rarities Night

    Highlight: Important 1849 Pacific Company $2.50 Silver Pattern The Garrett Specimen 10301 1849 Pacific Companyue complexion reveals gold and teal highlights across both sides of this experimental rarity. The devices are uniform and boldly rendered throughout, with just the faintest traces of friction across the highest points. The fields remain smooth and fully undisturbed for the assigned grade, appearing somewhat glassy in-hand. The issues of the Pacific Company have baffled and intrigued scholars for decades. It is thought that the “Pacific Company” organized by Boston merchant John W. Cartwright in January of 1849 might be the leading contender as issuers of a series of enigmatic coins all dated 1849. After

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    The Old West and Franklinton Collections

    Highlight: August 2006 • The Old West and Franklinton Collections Extremely Rare 1849 Pacific Company Gold $1 One of Two Known The Discovery Specimen 2x photo 1128 1849 Pacific Company $1 gold. K-unlisted. Rarity-8. Reeded edge. AU details (NCS), “mount removed.” One of the most exciting discoveries of the 20th century in the pioneer gold field. Discovered in the earth in New Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in 2000, this was the first identified example of this rarity in gold, and today stands as just one of two known after the proper identification of a misattributed piece in 2002. The obverse shows an even and very pleasing light yellow gold tone, lustrous and pleasing despite some remaining earthen encrustation and minor hairlines from a light post-discovery cleaning in the fields. The sharpness is superb

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

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    Letters Sent to San Francisco Mint

    /1917

    Highlight: yl9.29 Southern Pacific Company, autMaatie weighing machine from Philadelphia, December 18th, Southern Pacific Company, stationery from Wash- ington, December 12th, $5,41 Southern Pacific Company, fire brick and tile from Denver, November 11 8th, $122. 76 Southern, pacific Company, ville, Conn., January 17th, •t-o.uy Southern Pacific Company, Denver, February <3th, envelopes from Rock- blower and parts from Wells, Fargo & Co ®^ y * pe^Sary * 5” 1 $13?52 ire eulating Machine :from New York, February , v J f-nmuanv Express, collar's and Wells, Faxr go & Company. 104 Entry 235 Vol 420

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vol. 46

    /1912

    Highlight: PACIFIC COMPANY. 63 — Two and a Half Dollars. Obverse and Reverse, In all respects the same as those of the Pacific Company(27 and 28), except that the reverse reads 2 % dollars. Silver. There are only two known specimens of this variety. One is in the collection of H. O. Granberg, which he has kindly loaned for illustration. The other is in the collec- tion of Virgil M. Brand. 64 — Dollar. Obverse and Reverse, The same designs as those of the other Pacific Companyoins. Tin. There is only one example known in tin, which, in good condition, brought $1.05 at the Levick sale. 65 — Dollar. Obverse , The same as that of the Pacific Company Dollar (29), with 1 dollar below the Liberty cap. Reverse , Blank. SLruck over a Spanish Real of 1776. Good

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: Since the known “Pacific Company” coin specimens are dated 1849, it is highly unlikely that the Pacific Mining Co. issued them. Evidence would indicate that the most likely venture to have issued these coins is the pacific company. This company was formed on January 8, 1849, by Boston merchant John W. Cartwright of 32 India Street. The first public mention of the formation of this firm was a Boston Herald article which appeared on January 27, 1849: The “Pacific Company is forming at this port. The number is limited to thirty, who contribute $1,000 each. The ship York has been purchased, and will be fitted out as a home for the company in California for two years. They propose to sail about the 20th of February. Evidently thirty passengers were not enough to pay expenses and the ship was

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vol. 46

    /1912

    Highlight: PACIFIC COMPANY. 63 — Two and a Half Dollars. Obverse and Reverse, In all respects the same as those of the Pacific Company(27 and 28), except that the reverse reads 2 % dollars. Silver. There are only two known specimens of this variety. One is in the collection of H. O. Granberg, which he has kindly loaned for illustration. The other is in the collec- tion of Virgil M. Brand. 64 — Dollar. Obverse and Reverse, The same designs as those of the other Pacific Companyoins. Tin. There is only one example known in tin, which, in good condition, brought $1.05 at the Levick sale. 65 — Dollar. Obverse , The same as that of the Pacific Company Dollar (29), with 1 dollar below the Liberty cap. Reverse , Blank. SLruck over a Spanish Real of 1776. Good

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: Pacific Company 1849 $10, Pacific Company 1849 $ 2.50 Pacific Company 1849 $ 1.00 Pacific Company 1849 $ 5, Schultz & Co 1851 $10, Templeton Reid 1849 $25, Templeton Reid 1849 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $20, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $50, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $ 5, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co. 1855 $20, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 $50, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 A complete cabinet of the California issues as listed above represents con- siderable capital. Besides these there will also be exhibited some of the rar- est of the California quarter-dollar, half-dollar and one-dollar gold pieces, of which myriads were privately struck between 1852 and 1880. Not

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: Since the known “Pacific Company” coin specimens are dated 1849, it is highly unlikely that the Pacific Mining Co. issued them. Evidence would indicate that the most likely venture to have issued these coins is the pacific company. This company was formed on January 8, 1849, by Boston merchant John W. Cartwright of 32 India Street. The first public mention of the formation of this firm was a Boston Herald article which appeared on January 27, 1849: The “Pacific Company is forming at this port. The number is limited to thirty, who contribute $1,000 each. The ship York has been purchased, and will be fitted out as a home for the company in California for two years. They propose to sail about the 20th of February. Evidently thirty passengers were not enough to pay expenses and the ship was

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    America's Money, America's Story

    /2008

    Highlight: These Pacific Company $5 and $10 gold coins were likely struck in an old-fashioned manner — by manual force, with a sledgehammer, (shown 2x actual size) and Little is known of the Cincinnati Mining & Trading Company. Only a single example of its $5 gold coin (top) still exists. The $10 coin is represented by just seven surviving pieces; these are worth $600,000 or more in Extremely Fine condition, (shown 2x actual size) This second stage lasted until March 1851, brought to a close by rumors that the new wave of private issues was also shortweight. No further private coins appeared during the remainder of 1851. The third and final stage of California private coinage began in January 1852 continued through 1856. While some new moneyers entered the field and placed their names on issues

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: Pacific Company 1849 $10, Pacific Company 1849 $ 2.50 Pacific Company 1849 $ 1.00 Pacific Company 1849 $ 5, Schultz & Co 1851 $10, Templeton Reid 1849 $25, Templeton Reid 1849 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $20, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $50, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $ 5, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co. 1855 $20, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 $50, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 A complete cabinet of the California issues as listed above represents con- siderable capital. Besides these there will also be exhibited some of the rar- est of the California quarter-dollar, half-dollar and one-dollar gold pieces, of which myriads were privately struck between 1852 and 1880. Not

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: Pacific Company 1849 $10, Pacific Company 1849 $ 2.50 Pacific Company 1849 $ 1.00 Pacific Company 1849 $ 5, Schultz & Co 1851 $10, Templeton Reid 1849 $25, Templeton Reid 1849 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $20, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $50, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $ 5, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co. 1855 $20, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 $50, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 A complete cabinet of the California issues as listed above represents con- siderable capital. Besides these there will also be exhibited some of the rar- est of the California quarter-dollar, half-dollar and one-dollar gold pieces, of which myriads were privately struck between 1852 and 1880. Not

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: Pacific Company 1849 $10, Pacific Company 1849 $ 2.50 Pacific Company 1849 $ 1.00 Pacific Company 1849 $ 5, Schultz & Co 1851 $10, Templeton Reid 1849 $25, Templeton Reid 1849 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $10, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $20, United States Assay Office of Gold 1853 $50, United States Assay Office of Gold 1852 $ 5, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co 1852 $10, Wass, Moliter & Co. 1855 $20, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 $50, Wass, Moliter & Co 1855 A complete cabinet of the California issues as listed above represents con- siderable capital. Besides these there will also be exhibited some of the rar- est of the California quarter-dollar, half-dollar and one-dollar gold pieces, of which myriads were privately struck between 1852 and 1880. Not

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    Public auction of an outstanding collection of United States and foreign coins : U.S. paper money, rare territorial gold, Fontani thaler collection and foreign gold. [03/11-13/1965]

    Highlight: originally for 25,000.00 but since then we sold the $10 Pacific Companyhe $2.50; $5 and $10 struck from the original dies on the 50lh Anniversary of the Denver mint. This is set number 172, mounted in appropriately lettered plastic case and envelope with map on one side, and short history of J.J. Conway Co. An attractive set and quite scarce now as only 200 were reproduced. Perfect condition. Valued at (350.00) u — — ^ — 1 PACIFIC COMPANY THE PACIFIC COMPANY 2(4 DOLLAR PATTERN IN SILVER I ■ “ - - - ^ 26A 1849 Pacific Company, California around eagle, reverse, 2% DOLLARS below liber-

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    The Coles Collection of United States Gold Coins and Prioneer & Territorial Gold Coins

    Highlight: THE PACIFIC COMPANY THE PACIFIC COMPANY San Francisco, 1849 The coins issued by the “ Pacific Company ” were made by the firm of Broderick & Kohler. Both David C. Broderick and Frederick D. Kohler were volunteer firemen in New York City before being drawn to California by the news of the gold discoveries. The former was a stone cutter by trade, while the latter was a jeweler. In due course they rose to be distinguished citizens of their adopted State. Broderick became a U. S. Senator and Kohler the only California State Assayer. After the initial excitement generated by the rich finds of gold had died down the foundations for their considerable personal fortunes were laid by judicious investments in San Francisco real estate. As soon as the men arrived in California it became apparent that

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vol. 46

    /1912

    Highlight: It has been stated by one of his biographers that he engraved the dies for the coins of Broderick & Kohler — supposed to have been the Pacific Company pieces ; but this is certainly an error, for in his copy of Eckfeldt & Dubois’s book, as stated above, he made a careful memorandum over each of the coins engraved by him, and the spaces over the Pacific Company coins were left blank. He also wrote his name opposite each coin in the Index of California coins in another part of the same book, and in this again he omitted any mention of the coins of the Pacific Company. A. Reimers of San Francisco, another warm friend, states that Mr. Kiiner told him that he had engraved the dies for the N. G. & N. Five Dollar piece, and that these men were Stockton merchants, who expected to use the coins at

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: that this company may have made the dies inscribed PACIFIC COMPANYhe dies could easily have been sold to enterprising individuals such as Broderick and Kohler (see above), who then used them to strike the coins the next month. The historian is frustrated in that no documentation has apparently sur- vived concerning the coinage plans of any of these firms. Perhaps none of them planned to issue coins, and the dies for the “Pacific Companyder of an entirely different group. In any case, sufficient facts have not been revealed to make any firm conclusion about the derivation of extant coins bearing the name “Pacific Company.” Cincinnati Mining and Trading Company On or about

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vol. 46

    /1912

    Highlight: It has been stated by one of his biographers that he engraved the dies for the coins of Broderick & Kohler — supposed to have been the Pacific Company pieces ; but this is certainly an error, for in his copy of Eckfeldt & Dubois’s book, as stated above, he made a careful memorandum over each of the coins engraved by him, and the spaces over the Pacific Company coins were left blank. He also wrote his name opposite each coin in the Index of California coins in another part of the same book, and in this again he omitted any mention of the coins of the Pacific Company. A. Reimers of San Francisco, another warm friend, states that Mr. Kiiner told him that he had engraved the dies for the N. G. & N. Five Dollar piece, and that these men were Stockton merchants, who expected to use the coins at

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: As so much mystery surrounds the origin of The Pacific Company, the coins of which are now so excessively rare, and as all the accounts of the firm or company which struck these pieces during the pioneer days of Cali fornia have been founded principally upon conjecture, it may be of interest to reproduce the names of the members who formed the “Pacific Mining and Trading Company,” which have been taken from a newspaper of 1 849. It may be this was the company that originated the coins. It was formed in \Nrginia in 1 849, and included members from all parts of the State to the number of 115. On April 7, 1849, the company sailed for California from Richmond in the ship Mariana, and was said to have been the first Califor- nia expedition to start from that State. The organization of the

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    Numismatic finds of the Americas : an inventory of American coin hoards, shipwrecks, single finds, and finds in excavations

    /2009

    Highlight: Pacific Company, $1, 1849 Disposition: Found with a metal detector by Jerald Reinford. Sold at auction by Bowers and Merena, June 23, 2000, lot 1014. Bibliography: Bowers & Merena 2000, lot 1014. “Metal Detector Locates Coin Valued at $57,500,” Numismatist 113, no. 9 (September 2000): 1009. Coinfacts.com, “Pacific Company 1849 $1 Gold,” http://www.coinfacts.com/ pioneer_gold/pacific_company/pacific_ CO m p a ny_ 1 8 4 9_ 1 _go 1 d . h t m . 683. Ventura, California, USA, August 1 924. 'Type of find: Hoard. Date of deposit: 1 850. Contents: Ca. 50 P. Description: USA, obsolete banknotes?, all dated 1841, mostly denominated $1 Disposition: Found in a tree by F. W. Barron, an ex-Canadian soldier. Bibliography: “War Veteran Finds $50 in Old Tree,” Numismatist 37, no. 8 (August 1924): 498. 684.

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: that this company may have made the dies inscribed PACIFIC COMPANYhe dies could easily have been sold to enterprising individuals such as Broderick and Kohler (see above), who then used them to strike the coins the next month. The historian is frustrated in that no documentation has apparently sur- vived concerning the coinage plans of any of these firms. Perhaps none of them planned to issue coins, and the dies for the “Pacific Companyder of an entirely different group. In any case, sufficient facts have not been revealed to make any firm conclusion about the derivation of extant coins bearing the name “Pacific Company.” Cincinnati Mining and Trading Company On or about

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: As so much mystery surrounds the origin of The Pacific Company, the coins of which are now so excessively rare, and as all the accounts of the firm or company which struck these pieces during the pioneer days of Cali fornia have been founded principally upon conjecture, it may be of interest to reproduce the names of the members who formed the “Pacific Mining and Trading Company,” which have been taken from a newspaper of 1 849. It may be this was the company that originated the coins. It was formed in \Nrginia in 1 849, and included members from all parts of the State to the number of 115. On April 7, 1849, the company sailed for California from Richmond in the ship Mariana, and was said to have been the first Califor- nia expedition to start from that State. The organization of the

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: As so much mystery surrounds the origin of The Pacific Company, the coins of which are now so excessively rare, and as all the accounts of the firm or company which struck these pieces during the pioneer days of Cali fornia have been founded principally upon conjecture, it may be of interest to reproduce the names of the members who formed the “Pacific Mining and Trading Company,” which have been taken from a newspaper of 1 849. It may be this was the company that originated the coins. It was formed in \Nrginia in 1 849, and included members from all parts of the State to the number of 115. On April 7, 1849, the company sailed for California from Richmond in the ship Mariana, and was said to have been the first Califor- nia expedition to start from that State. The organization of the

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 25 (1912)

    /1912

    Highlight: As so much mystery surrounds the origin of The Pacific Company, the coins of which are now so excessively rare, and as all the accounts of the firm or company which struck these pieces during the pioneer days of Cali fornia have been founded principally upon conjecture, it may be of interest to reproduce the names of the members who formed the “Pacific Mining and Trading Company,” which have been taken from a newspaper of 1 849. It may be this was the company that originated the coins. It was formed in \Nrginia in 1 849, and included members from all parts of the State to the number of 115. On April 7, 1849, the company sailed for California from Richmond in the ship Mariana, and was said to have been the first Califor- nia expedition to start from that State. The organization of the

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    The Elm Rock Collection of U.S. Colonial Coins, The Schoonmaker Collection of Western Numismatic Americana, U.S. Gold, Silver and Copper Coins

    Highlight: (SEE COLOR PLATE ) 1849 PACIFIC COMPANY COPPER GILT PATTERN $5 Lot No. 1021 (Enlarged) 1021 1849 Pacific Companymiss- ing in gilt copper from the Clifford, Kosoff, and Garrett sales. Choice About Uncirculated. Reeded edge, applied by a collar with closely but irregular- ly spaced thin teeth, not all of which were of uni- form length. 23.0mm. 82.8 gns. A fine job of gilding, creating a fme grain matte-like appear- ance. There are only four gold Pacific Company $5 pieces known, probably only one gilt copper piece (this coin), and a handful of plain copper ones. (SEE COLOR PLATE) Ex Kagin sale November 2, 1973, lot 1808. COPPER GILT SAN FRANCISCO STATE OF CALIFORNIA PATTERN $2.50 Lot

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 44 - 45

    1/1/1910

    Highlight: THE PACIFIC COMPANY, SAN FRANCISCO. 1849. From what information can be gained, the coins bearing the stamp of the 44 Pacific Company” were produced by the coining firm of Broderick & Kohler, sometimes referred to as F. D. Kohler & Co., composed of David C. Broderick, afterward United States Senator from California, and one of that State’s chief citizens, and Frederick D. Kohler, the first Chief Engineer

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    New Varieties of Gold and Silver Coins (1852)

    1/1/1852

    Highlight: Pacific Company, 1849. 12. — Five Dollars, Massachusetts and Califomia Company. 21. — Five Dollars, Shultz and Company. PLATE SECOND. No. 7.— Ten Dollars, J. S. 0. (Ormsby of Pennsylvania.) 9. — Ten Dollars, Templeton Reid, Assayer. 10.— Ten Dollars, Pacific Company, 1849. " 16. — Ten Dollars, Baldwin and Company, 1850. 17. — Ten Dollars, Baldwin and Company, 1851. 18. — Five Dollars, Baldwin and Company, 1850. 19.— Ten Dollars, Dubosq and Company, 1850. ** 25.— Two and a Half Dollars, Mormon Coin, Utah. PLATE THIRD. No. 2. — Ten Dollars, Oregon Exchange Company. 18.— Ten Dollars, Cincinnati Mining and Trading Company, 1849. 14.— Five Dollars, Cincinnati Mining and Tradmg Company, 1849. 20. — Five Dollars, Dubosq and Company, 1850. 22.— 'twenty Dollars, Mormon Coin, Utah. 23. — Ten Dollars

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    Recollections of a newspaperman; a record of life and events in California

    /1917

    Highlight: as they came under the jur- isdiction of the California Pacific company. However, we were not destined to enjoy the business for any great length of time. The Central Pacific company had com- pleted its road over the Sierras and across the State of Nevada, and made junction with the Union Pacific near Ogden, and had also, under the name of the Western Pacific, completed the railroad from Sacramento to Oak- land, and was looking with jealous eyes upon its com- petitors who already had the best and shortest lines where there was the greatest amount of local travel, and was threatening to become an opponent to transcon- tinental business. The owners of the Central Pacific did the only thing possible to head oif this formidable com- petitor. They leased the entire system of the California

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    Recollections of a newspaperman; a record of life and events in California

    /1917

    Highlight: California Pacific Company, 143-144, 154-156. Central Pacific Company, 156. first in Sacramento, 31-32. Napa Valley, 155. Stockton and Copperopolis, 155. Railroads, "palace cars," early type of, 191. traveling overland in 1875, 191-192. Railway strike of 1894, 265-273. Ranch life, 241-242, 245-250, 254-255. Real estate transactions, 142, 171-172, 213-215. Redding, B. B., 165. Register, Napa, newspaper, 113. Relief fund, handled temporarily at Mint, 3.S9, 349. Reporter, Napa, newspaper, 113, 115-119. Return to California during Civil War, 78-80. — «3

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    United States Rare Coin Value Guide [Prices Paid For List]

    /1958

    Highlight: Round and Octagonal 6.00 (Note: We do not buy souvenir California gold pieces) California Five Dollar Gold 1849 Massachusetts and California Company 500.00 1849 Pacific Companyompany 10.00 1849 J. S. Ormsby, Sacramento 500.00 1850 Dubosq & Company 500.00 1850 Baldwin & Company 75.00 1851 Shults & Company 200.00 1851 Wass, Molitor & Co 20.00 1851 Dunbar & Company 200.00 California Ten Dollar Gold 1849 Moffat & Company 25.00 1849 Cincinnati Mining & Trading Company 500.00 1849 Pacific Company 500.00 1849 J. S. Ormsby, Sacramento 500.00 1850 Baldwin & Company 200.00 1850 Dubosq & Company 500.00 1851 Baldwin & Company 200.00 1852 Augustus Humbert U.S. Assayer 40.00 1853 U. S. Assay

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    The Brasher Bulletin

    1/7/2014

    Highlight: $82,250 1849 Pacific Company Gold Dollar MS61 NGC. $305,500 1849 Pacific Company Five Dollar AU58 PCGS. K-l, High R.7. $763,750 1 850 Dubosq & Co. Ten Dollar MS60 NGC. K-2, R.7. $329,000 1850 Baldwin Five Dollar MS61 PCGS. K-2, R.5+ $82,250 1850 Baldwin Ten Dollar MS61 PCGS. K-3, R.6. $381,875 1851 Baldwin Ten Dollar MS61 PCGS. K-4. High R.6. $235,000 1851 Baldwin Twenty Dollar XF45 PCGS. K-5, High R.7. $646,250 1 85 1 Shultz & Co. Five Dollar MS62 NGC. K-l , R.7. $340,750 1851 Shultz & Co. Five Dollar AU53 NGC. K-l, R.7. $152,750 1852 Wass Molitor Five Dollar, Small Head MS60 PCGS. K-l, R.7. $82,250 1852 Wass, Molitor Ten Dollar, Large Head, AU58 NGC. K-4, R.5. $16,450 1852 Wass Molitor Ten Dollar, Small Head XF40 NGC. K-3, R.6. $16,450 1855 Wass Molitor Ten Dollar AU55 NGC. K-6, High R.5

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 6]

    /1852

    Highlight: Pacific Company, 1849. “ 12.— Five Dollars, Massachusetts and California Company. 44 21. — Five Dollars, Shultz and Company. PLATE SECOND. No. 7. — Ten Dollars, J. S. 0. (Orrasby of Pennsylvania.) 41 9. — Ten Dollars, Templeton Reid, Assayer. 44 10. — Ten Dollars, Pacific Company, 1849. 44 16. — Ten Dollars, Baldwin and Company, 1850. 44 17. — Ten Dollars, Baldwin and Company, 1861. 44 18. — Five Dollars, Baldwin and Company, 1850. 44 19.— Ten Dollars, Dubosq and Company, 1850. 44 25.— Two and a Half Dollars, Mormon Coin, Utah. PLATE THIRD. No. 2. — Ten Dollars, Oregon Exchange Company. 44 13. — Ten Dollars, Cincinnati Mining and Trading Company, 1849. 44 14. — Five Dollars, Cincinnati Mining and Trading ComD&ny, 1849. 44 20. — Five Dollars, Dubosq and Company, 1860. 44 22.— Twenty Dollars

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    Chapman, S.H. and H.: Garrett catalogue 1 [ANS Garrett papers, box 3, folder 2a1]

    1/1/1906

    Highlight: PACIFIC COMPANY. 1849 $b. PACIFIC COMPANY CAETFORNIA 1849. Eagle with upstretcned wings, the head turned to left, olive branch in left and miner’s hammer in right talon. Reverse. Liberty staff and k cap in a glory of ten (groups of three) rays, each ray interspersed with three stars, below 5 DOLLARS. Border and edge milled. Size 14-l/s. Wt . 1B9-3/4 grs. Gold. Very fine* Excessively rare. We know of but three. U. S. Mint. De Witt S. Smith. Robert Garrett J. S. ORMSBY. Reverse 10 DOLLS across field, around edge stars, BO of which are strongly struck. Silver. Good. This curious piece is struck on a B reales of Ferdinand VTI of Mexico. Unique BALDWIN * CO. to, 18b 0 $b $b . Head of Liberty facing left, undraped, on diadem BALDWIN 4. CO. Around thirteen stars and date, Reverse. S. M. V. 8A8

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    The New Rare Coin Book

    /1934

    Highlight: 1849 iMoffat & Co 11.00 13.00 1849 Templeton Reid 60.00 100.00 1849 Moffat & Co 12.00 13.00 1849 Cincinnati Mining & Trading Co 60.00 100.00 1849 Pacific Company 50.00 100.00 1850 Baldwin & Co 25.00 40.00 1850 Dubosq & Co 50.00 100.00 1851 Baldwin & Co 25.00 40.00 1842 U. S. Assay 10.00 12.00 1852 W. M. & Co 12.00 15.00 1852 Moffat & Co 11.00 13.00 1852 Augustus Humbert 10.00 12.00' 1853 W. M. & Co 12.00 15.00 1853 U. S. Assay 12.00 14.00 1853 Augustus Humbert 11.00 13.00 1854 W. M. & Co 12.00 14.00 1855 W. M. & Co 12.00 15.00 Miners Bank 25.00 25.00 J. S. O. (J. S. Ormsby) 31 stars 200.00 300.00 $9.43 Oblong. Moffat & Co., 21 7-16 carat 18.00 25.00 $5.00 Pieces. 1849 Moffat & Co 5.50 7.00 1849 Cincinnati Min. & Trad. Co 50.00 100.00 1849 Pacific Co 150.00 200.00 1849 Mass. & Cal. Co 10.00

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: About the same time (September 1849) the Pacific Company, the California Mining and Trading Company of Cincinnati (to be discussed later), and the Ithaca & California Mining Company arrived in California. Since these three companies immediately disbanded upon arriving in California, Stevenson could have been offered any of their coining equipment, including dies. While it is not certain that Pacific Company actually had any heavy equipment, the latter two companies did. It is even conceivable, although unlikely, that assayer Kohler brought some equip- ment with him. Probably because of his previous association in New York with Messrs. Broderick and Kohler, and Kohler s assaying experience, Stevenson approached them to run his new coining operation. Frederick D. Kohler had a varied life. Th

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    Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the United States

    1/1/1981

    Highlight: Pacific Company indicate that though coins were issued with this name on them, dated 1849, these coins probably were minted by another company from discarded or sold dies bearing this name, with the proceeds from the dies use probably not accruing in whole or part to any firm called by this name. The origin and composition of the company who probably made or commissioned prepared dies bearing the Pacific Company name is 103

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