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    RR Smith

    The Old West and Franklinton Collections

    Highlight: & R.R. Smith & Co., Col. Ter. $5 A Singularly Historical Discovery 1143 (1862) Reverse die for P. and R.R. Smith & Co. $5 coin. Unique. Lightly Used. Steel. 40 mm from top to bottom, shank 35 mm tall, 39 mm in diameter. Die face 22.7 mm in diameter. A completely new discovery, but one that answers a long-standing question in Colorado territorial gold circles: what die matched the 1862-dated Liberty Head $5 obverse die now in the collection of the Colorado Historical Society? That die, depicted in the Kagin book on p. 320 with several dies for J.J, Conway & Co. coins, is clearly different from the Conway dies in size and style, not to mention date, but it had never been satisfactorily attributed. The present unique artifact from the Colorado Gold Rush, long held privately in the same hands

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

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    PIONEER GOLD DIE IMAGES AND LOT DESCRIPTIONS ONLINE

    PIONEER GOLD DIE IMAGES AND LOT DESCRIPTIONS ONLINE

    07/16/2006

    Highlight: and R.R. Smith & Co. The "Col. Ter."seen at the base of this die positively identifies it as a productof Colorado Territory."Lot 1143: (1862) Reverse die for P. and R.R. Smith & Co. $5 coin.Full Story

    The E-Sylum: Volume 9, Number 29, July 16, 2006, Article 26PIONEER GOLD DIE IMAGES AND LOT DESCRIPTI

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    PIONEER GOLD DIE IMAGES AND LOT DESCRIPTIONS ONLINE

    PIONEER GOLD DIE IMAGES AND LOT DESCRIPTIONS ONLINE

    07/16/2006

    Highlight: and R.R. Smith & Co. The "Col. Ter."
    seen at the base of this die positively identifies it as a product
    of Colorado Territory."

    Lot 1143: (1862) Reverse die for P. and R.R. Smith & Co. $5 coin.
    Full Story

    The E-Sylum: Volume 9, Number 29, July 16, 2006, Article 26

    PIONEER GOLD DIE IMAGES AND LO

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    The Brasher Bulletin

    1/9/2006

    Highlight: & R.R. Smith & Co. was found along with the obverse die for Conway’s $5 gold piece. American Numismatic Rarities recently sold both pieces. The Smith reverse die is the counterpart to the 1862 Liberty head obverse die found in Modesitt’s mansion. Were Smith and Conway partners in some sort of minting operation or did Smith buy out Conway and strike coins on his own? Lee believes the Smith die was used to strike coins. After careful examination of the surviving dies he found flecks of gold still adhering to the die in the recessed areas of Liberty’s hair. He also stated that the die and die collar show wear. There were unclaimed letters waiting for J.J. Conway on July 1, August 1, 1861 and December 5, 1864 at the Denver Post Office. Perhaps they were from relatives or friends trying to reac

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    ANR OFFERS PIONEER GOLD COIN DIES

    ANR OFFERS PIONEER GOLD COIN DIES

    07/09/2006

    Highlight: & R.R. Smith & Co, Col. Ter.,? a referenceto the Colorado Territory. It apparently matches a maverick 1862-datedLiberty Head obverse die now in the collection of the ColoradoHistorical Society. This unique artifact represents the soleconnection to the apparently ill-fated Smith coining plan and isone of the most important discoveries ever made in the field ofColorado numismatics or territorial gold in general"

    The E-Sylum: Volume 9, Number 28, July 9, 2006, Article 20ANR OFFERS PIONEER GOLD COIN DIESAccording

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    The Brasher Bulletin

    1/9/2006

    Highlight: & R.R. Smith & Co. was found along with the obverse die for Conway’s $5 gold piece. American Numismatic Rarities recently sold both pieces. The Smith reverse die is the counterpart to the 1862 Liberty head obverse die found in Modesitt’s mansion. Were Smith and Conway partners in some sort of minting operation or did Smith buy out Conway and strike coins on his own? Lee believes the Smith die was used to strike coins. After careful examination of the surviving dies he found flecks of gold still adhering to the die in the recessed areas of Liberty’s hair. He also stated that the die and die collar show wear. There were unclaimed letters waiting for J.J. Conway on July 1, August 1, 1861 and December 5, 1864 at the Denver Post Office. Perhaps they were from relatives or friends trying to reac

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    The J.A. Sherman Collection: Rare Coins and Minerals

    Highlight: & R.R. Smith & Company. Aside from these two appearances and this present offering of the Clark, Gruber & Co. die, we are not aware of any other auction appearances of coin dies from any coiner of territorial gold pieces. While the Conway die was used to strike a coin so rare today as to be essentially uncollectable, and the Smith die was previously unknown and thus obscure, both pieces were recognized by collectors for their importance and enthusiastic bidding generated final prices approaching six-figures for each. In welcomed contrast, this Clark, Gruber & Company die was used to produce one of the most famous of all territorial gold issues, the first coin type struck by Clark, Gruber & Company, the Pikes Peak $10. Regardless of when it was discarded and the conditions under which this

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    The Old West and Franklinton Collections

    Highlight: and — talk about unique opportunities — a $5 die from R.R. Smith, a previ- ously unknown Colorado coiner (reference book compilers take notice!). American Bank Note Company Treasures Sometimes in numismatics there are once-in-a-lifetime oppor- tunities, events that never happened before and will never happen again. A few years ago here m Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, Chris Karstedt and I were at the epicenter of news and publicity, and involved in the distribution of the gold coins and ingots from the S.S. Central America, an event that Coin World editor Beth Deisher called “the story of the year.” The coins, their history, and the people involved will be forever remembered — an absolute highlight of my numismatic career. The coins and ingots are all sold now, and in many instances the origina

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

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    The Old West and Franklinton Collections

    Highlight: a man named Colonel R.R. Smith was the manager ot the Miner’s Smelting Company in Golden, Colorado, a tirin that was reported to be “the second company in the state to separate the gold from refractory ores.” Colonel Smith was re- ported to be “manager of the works.” Certainly the sort of person who w'ould coin territorial coins in the 186()s could have worked as the director ot a Colorado gold refinery in the 1880s, but the long gap ot time makes this uncertain. It is a clue, at least, and future researchers may well discern more given the proper time and resources. Indeed, considering the indications that this die was used, a coin of its imprint could still be discovered! A coin with no specimens known is clearly the highest possible rarity; unfortunately, it means that only one collecto

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

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    ANR OFFERS PIONEER GOLD COIN DIES

    ANR OFFERS PIONEER GOLD COIN DIES

    07/09/2006

    Highlight: & R.R. Smith & Co, Col. Ter.,” a reference
    to the Colorado Territory. It apparently matches a maverick 1862-dated
    Liberty Head obverse die now in the collection of the Colorado
    Historical Society. This unique artifact represents the sole
    connection to the apparently ill-fated Smith coining plan and is
    one of the most important discoveries ever made in the field of
    Colorado numismatics or territorial gold in general"

    The E-Sylum: Volume 9, Number 28, July 9, 2006, Article 20

    ANR OFFERS PIONEER GOLD COIN DI

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