Skip to content

NNP Library //Library Search

20873 records found.

    Page 1 of 418

    Temple

    THE TEMPLE MOUNT SIFTING PROJECT

    09/25/2016

    Highlight: THE TEMPLE MOUNT SIFTING PROJECT http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v19n39a33.html

    Jere Bacharach (our second E-Sylum email subscriber) forwarded this blog article about the Temple Mount Sifting Project. Thanks. -Editor

    Temple Mount Sifting Project"><b style=Temple"" src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8">

    About the Project
    The Temple Mount Sifting Project is under the auspices of Bar-Ilan University. The sifting is funded

    MORE ON THE MULTI-$BILLION TREASURE DISCOVERED IN INDIA

    07/10/2011

    Highlight: Indian temple has unearthed gold, jewels and statues worth an estimated $22 billion, government officials said Monday.

    The treasure trove, at the 16th century Sri Padmanabhaswamy templels in the state of Kerala by surprise and forcing the government to send two dozen police officers to the previously unguarded shrine for round-the-clock security.

    The discovery has also revived questions about who should manage the wealth, much of which is believed to have been deposited at the temple royal family of the princely state of Travancore, which acceded to India when the country became independent in 1947. Some of the vaults under the temple have not been opened for nearly 150 years, temple

    Read more

    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2007

    Highlight: Essex A 62.0021 temple excavation 1962 A 67.0134 temple excavation 1966 A 85.0109 temple exc.. HT 85. sf 286 A 90.0350 temple exc., HT 85, sr 845 A 90.0428 temple exc., HT 87, sf 1082 A 90.0469 temple exc.. HT 87. sf 1169 A 90.0477 temple exc., HT 87, sf 1193 A 90.0530 temple exc.. HT 87, sf 1304 B 67,0)35 temple excavation 1967 C 62.0020 temple excavation 1 962 C 67.0133 temple excavation 1966 C 73.0293 exc. at Holbrooks 1970, CI241 D 67.0145 temple excavation 1967 D 90.0286 temple exc., HT 86, sf 700 D 90.0573 temple exc., HT 87, sf 1378 D 90.0607 temple exc.. HT 87, sf 1458 Hayling Island, Hants. C 91.0455 temple exc. 1978, sf 1699 Puckeridge. Herts. C 73.0291 exc. at Skeleton Green 1972, sf 687 Radley, Oxon. C 79.0020 exc. at Thrupp House Farm 1979 Silchester, Hants. A 91.0533 exc.

    Read more

    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2013

    Highlight: Verica’s temple type and a potential prototype. 15. Verica, silver minim, obverse depicting temple (reproduced x 2 ), ABC 1316: Chris Rudd List 139, no. 26. 16. © The author. Mark Antony, denarius, reverse depict- ing templeM, CM 1867,0101.1 130. © The Trustees of the British Museum. ceeding from the part to the whole, or from the central element to the wider context. It is arguable, therefore, that the apparent altar may well be intended as such since it could be said to form the central element of the temple, or temple-complex, in the same way that the head is the central or controlling element of the body. Alternatively, one could nuance this interpre- tation to say that, whatever exactly it was supposed to be - whether an altar, a cupboard

    Read more

    MORE ON THE MULTI-$BILLION TREASURE DISCOVERED IN INDIA

    07/10/2011

    Highlight: Indian temple has unearthed gold, jewels and statues worth an estimated $22 billion, government officials said Monday. The treasure trove, at the 16th century Sri Padmanabhaswamy templeofficials in the state of Kerala by surprise and forcing the government to send two dozen police officers to the previously unguarded shrine for round-the-clock security. The discovery has also revived questions about who should manage the wealth, much of which is believed to have been deposited at the templee royal family of the princely state of Travancore, which acceded to India when the country became independent in 1947. Some of the vaults under the temple have not been opened for nearly 150 years, temple officials

    Nick Graver forwarded this article from The New York Times on the recently announced treasure hoard

    Read more

    Public and mail auction sale : 1977 convention of international numismatics ... [06/17-18/1977]

    Highlight: Francisca Temple de Ajuria. Casa de Moneda de Mexico. 1879." which translates to: "To Her Excellency Mrs. Maria P. Forster. Francisca TempleCity Mint. 1879." This set was a government gift from the wife of the director and lessee of the Mexico City Mint to the wife of the United States Ambassador to Mexico. We quote from a letter of 1964 from the preeminent Mexican numismatic historian, Dr. Alberto Francisco Pradeau: "...The exquisite presentation case from Mme. Temple de Ajuria to Mrs. Forster (sic) who was the wife of the U.S. Minister to Mexico the Hon. John Watson Foster who, by reason of his post, could not accept such a valuable gift, but from a woman to Mrs. Foster, no one could offer criticism. The misspelling of the name may be attributed to the ignorance of the

    Read more

    The Augur, Vol. 1, No. 10

    1/11/1977

    Highlight: Matthew indicates that Jesus went into the temple of God and cast out all them that sold and bought in the temple. (Matthew 21:13). This same event is paraphrased in Mark, where another detail is added: And he would not suffer that any man should carry any vessel through the temple (Mark 11:16). The third reference to this event is contained in John where greater insight is given, indicating that it was Passover and that Jesus drove them all (those that sold oxen and sheep and doves and the changers of money) out of the temple. Here the temple but a house of merchandise. Madden misses the point when he states that “the system pursued by the money changers in the Temple must have been a vicious one,” for it was the OVERALL commercialization — even the carryin

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 11, no. 6 (November-December 1978)

    /1978

    Highlight: Matthew indicates that Jesus went Into the temple of God and cast out all them that sold aod bought in the temple. (Matthew 21.13) This same event is paraphrased in Mark, where another detail is added And he would not suffer that any man should carry any vessel through the temple (Mark 11 16) The third reference to this event is contained m John where greater insight is given, indicating that it was Passover and that Jesus drove them nil (those that sold oxen aod sheep and doves aod the chnngers of money 1 out of the temple. Here the temples, but a bouse of merchandise. Madden misses the point when he states that “the system pursued by the money changers in the Temple must have been a vicious one." for It was the OVERALL commercialiiation — even the carrying o

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 11, no. 6 (November-December 1978)

    /1978

    Highlight: Matthew indicates that Jesus went Into the temple of God and cast out all them that sold aod bought in the temple. (Matthew 21.13) This same event is paraphrased in Mark, where another detail is added And he would not suffer that any man should carry any vessel through the temple (Mark 11 16) The third reference to this event is contained m John where greater insight is given, indicating that it was Passover and that Jesus drove them nil (those that sold oxen aod sheep and doves aod the chnngers of money 1 out of the temple. Here the temples, but a bouse of merchandise. Madden misses the point when he states that “the system pursued by the money changers in the Temple must have been a vicious one." for It was the OVERALL commercialiiation — even the carrying o

    Read more

    The Augur, Vol. 1, No. 10

    1/11/1977

    Highlight: Matthew indicates that Jesus went into the temple of God and cast out all them that sold and bought in the temple. (Matthew 21:13). This same event is paraphrased in Mark, where another detail is added: And he would not suffer that any man should carry any vessel through the temple (Mark 11:16). The third reference to this event is contained in John where greater insight is given, indicating that it was Passover and that Jesus drove them all (those that sold oxen and sheep and doves and the changers of money) out of the temple. Here the temple but a house of merchandise. Madden misses the point when he states that “the system pursued by the money changers in the Temple must have been a vicious one,” for it was the OVERALL commercialization — even the carryin

    Read more

    Harper's Weekly

    /1878

    Highlight: Temple was ob-liirol u> make A dive In-fore It diwippeured t.-nniK Uri. Ash- bury's iuIuiiiIbou* gray yi take * walk on tta trach In llw mrly morning, Ui>4 K‘‘|-.lU»- f" *' Vm, I hsvo f»r; but if you po-fi-r mo- nn|Milizing th*j bvocts, I « ill go toward B ur •' Why nnt go te

    Read more

    GOLDBERG ANCIENT JEWISH COINS 2017 NYINC SALE

    12/18/2016

    Highlight: remarkable number (45) of extremely rare silver coins picturing the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, minted just 60 years after the Temple had been destroyed in 70 CE. Each of these museum quality approximately quarter dollar size silver coins pictures the interior of the Temple, including the Ark of the Covenant surrounded by columns, usually with a star above—thought to refer to the Jewish leader Simon Bar Kochba (Simon Son of the Star), who was proclaimed the Messiah by Rabbi Akiva, and whose name, in ancient Hebrew, surrounds the Temple. The other side of the Temple with Hebrew inscriptions like “For the Freedom of Israel.” The auction company estimates that most of the Holy Temple coins will sell for $5,000 and up.

    Here is the press release for the Goldbergs' sale of Ancient Jewish Coins at n

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 41, no. 6 (November-December 2008)

    /2008

    Highlight: construction of the First Temple in Jerusalem. According to biblical accounts, its construction was a tremendous undertaking, requiring the services of 10,000 woodcutters in Lebanon, 80,000 stonecutters, 70,000 porters moving building materials to the site, and 3,300 supervisors [I Kings, 5: 29], By 823 B.C.E., the First Temple was completed and formed a religious, social and judicial center for the Israelite nation. Authorities forbade offerings to be made in any other location, and all Israelites were required to make three annual pilgrimages to the Temple. Furthermore, the Great Sanhedrin, a national court handling religious and civil matters, met in the Templef the Babylonian Emperor Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the First Temple. Following the Babylonian

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 24, no. 1 (January-February 1991)

    /1991

    Highlight: The Temple Mount - State Medal, 5742-1 982 Reverse A reconstructed three dimensional map of Jerusalem discovered in the floor mosaic of a 6th century church ruin. Jerusalem and her walls are shown together with the spires and representative buildings. (The Temple Mount area is seen on the upper part of the map.) The legend "Jerusalem" in Hebrew and English. This, strictly speaking, was the Second Templee, dignified by capital let- ters, is generally reserved for the complex built 400 years later — in the 1st century BCE — by Herod. He doubled the size of the Tem- ple Mount and embellished the Temple itself so that the complex was considered by con- temporaries as the most magnificent in the ancient world, including Athens and Rome. W hat the tunnel has now told us, says

    Read more

    The Augur, Vol. 1, No. 5

    1/6/1977

    Highlight: This was the only procession at the Temple, at which laymen also took part. I would therefore suggest, that Bar Giora who had to encamp outside the Temple enclosure, stressed on his coins the fact that the functions in the Temple were not exclusively a prerogative of the priests. It stresses the importance of layment even in the domian of Temple worship. In the synagogue (already an important part of Israelite life in that period) the part played by priests was largely of secondary nature. It is likely that this trend is even more apparent on the coins of the Second Revolt led by Simon bar Cocheba, the "Son of Star”, against Hadrian in A.D. 132-135. On some coins of the first year of the insurrection Eleazar the Priest - obviously the High Priest designate - figures on coins. The name of

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 24, no. 1 (January-February 1991)

    /1991

    Highlight: The Temple Mount - State Medal, 5742-1 982 Reverse A reconstructed three dimensional map of Jerusalem discovered in the floor mosaic of a 6th century church ruin. Jerusalem and her walls are shown together with the spires and representative buildings. (The Temple Mount area is seen on the upper part of the map.) The legend "Jerusalem" in Hebrew and English. This, strictly speaking, was the Second Templee, dignified by capital let- ters, is generally reserved for the complex built 400 years later — in the 1st century BCE — by Herod. He doubled the size of the Tem- ple Mount and embellished the Temple itself so that the complex was considered by con- temporaries as the most magnificent in the ancient world, including Athens and Rome. W hat the tunnel has now told us, says

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 41, no. 6 (November-December 2008)

    /2008

    Highlight: construction of the First Temple in Jerusalem. According to biblical accounts, its construction was a tremendous undertaking, requiring the services of 10,000 woodcutters in Lebanon, 80,000 stonecutters, 70,000 porters moving building materials to the site, and 3,300 supervisors [I Kings, 5: 29], By 823 B.C.E., the First Temple was completed and formed a religious, social and judicial center for the Israelite nation. Authorities forbade offerings to be made in any other location, and all Israelites were required to make three annual pilgrimages to the Temple. Furthermore, the Great Sanhedrin, a national court handling religious and civil matters, met in the Templef the Babylonian Emperor Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the First Temple. Following the Babylonian

    Read more

    The Augur, Vol. 1, No. 5

    1/6/1977

    Highlight: This was the only procession at the Temple, at which laymen also took part. I would therefore suggest, that Bar Giora who had to encamp outside the Temple enclosure, stressed on his coins the fact that the functions in the Temple were not exclusively a prerogative of the priests. It stresses the importance of layment even in the domian of Temple worship. In the synagogue (already an important part of Israelite life in that period) the part played by priests was largely of secondary nature. It is likely that this trend is even more apparent on the coins of the Second Revolt led by Simon bar Cocheba, the "Son of Star”, against Hadrian in A.D. 132-135. On some coins of the first year of the insurrection Eleazar the Priest - obviously the High Priest designate - figures on coins. The name of

    Read more

    Pesonal Tokens and Medals of American Numismatists

    7/4/2017

    Highlight: MAMIE & BOBBY / PARFET / TEMPLE, PENNSYLVANIA / Series IV - 1970 //A warm and friendly greeting / from the / MUSHROOM CAPITAL / TEMPLE PENNSYLVANIA V □ Balsa, 128 x 77 mm. AND BEST WISHES / FOR A / HAPPY NEW YEAR / from / GEORGE, MAMIE AND BOBBY PARFET / Templeval of / ANGELA TAE STACKHOUSE / 7 lb. -10 oz. Blond / Daughter of - Pat and gary Stackhouse / Grandaughter of - Mamie and george Parfet // THE LITTLE CHIP / Bom - March 8, 1972 V □ Balsa, 100 x 65 mm. AND A WOODEN NEW YEAR / from / George, Mamie and Bobby Parfet / Temple, Pennsylvania // MERRY CHRISTMAS / 1972 / Series VI V □ Balsa, 125 x 76 mm. MERRY / CHRISTMAS / 1973 / Mr. & Mrs. George Parfet / and Bobby

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 23, no. 6 (November-December 1990)

    /1990

    Highlight: Comments on the Second Temple by Ralph L. Fusco For some time I have had a desire to know what the 2nd Temple looked like. My most recent acquisition, a silver tetradrachm stuck during Bar Kokhba Revolt not only shows the facade of a templethat shook the whole Roman world was the period of the Bar Hokhba Revolt. The origin of the Revolt is usually attributed to one or more of the following causes: 1. Hadrian, The Ruler of Judea at the time had promised the Jews at the beginning of his reign in 117 C.E. that the temple would be rebuilt. He with- drew his promise at the behest of the Samaritans who were adamantly opposed to the rebuilding of the temple; 2. He prohibited circum- cision, a practice

    Read more

    American Journal of Numismatics (Second Series), Vol. 19

    1/1/2007

    Highlight: / http://www.hathitrust.Org/access_use#cc-by-nc-sa-4.0 47 The Gold Coinage of Trajan Dated COS V Series 4: The Octastylc Temple Reverses I would argue that the consistent and imequivocal attributes of Jupiter that appear elsewhere in the minter’s cache of punches, as revealed by the die study, raise new possibilities for understanding this temple. Another reverse type of an octastyle templeappearing in bronze issues of the COS V period, with specimens at BMC 863-866 and 958, may be more useful as a comparandum than that suggest- ed by Strack and Mattingly for identifying our 4.III. The temple on the bronzes at BMC 863-866 and 958 has always been viewed as distinct from our 4.III because of three prominent discrepancies: (1) there are just three

    Read more

    Numismatic Notes and Monographs, nos. 158

    1/1/1967

    Highlight: of the temples, which add to the list of Christiana Religio mint cities Laon and Beziers, and, from a later period, Constance.^® A final point of comparison is the appearance of distinctive markings on a relatively small number of Christiana Religio issues of Louis the Pious (cat. 480-505). Some of these correspond with markings on the coins of Lothaire I and of Charles the Bald; one dot beneath the temple (Louis, cat

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 23, no. 6 (November-December 1990)

    /1990

    Highlight: Comments on the Second Temple by Ralph L. Fusco For some time I have had a desire to know what the 2nd Temple looked like. My most recent acquisition, a silver tetradrachm stuck during Bar Kokhba Revolt not only shows the facade of a templethat shook the whole Roman world was the period of the Bar Hokhba Revolt. The origin of the Revolt is usually attributed to one or more of the following causes: 1. Hadrian, The Ruler of Judea at the time had promised the Jews at the beginning of his reign in 117 C.E. that the temple would be rebuilt. He with- drew his promise at the behest of the Samaritans who were adamantly opposed to the rebuilding of the temple; 2. He prohibited circum- cision, a practice

    Read more

    Harlan J. Berk, Ltd. 100th Buy or Bid Sale

    Highlight: Six-columned temple, right door ajar. EF/VF 250 602. DIVUS MAXIMIANUS HERACLIUS; Died 310 AD, Follis struck by his son Maxentius (306-312 AD), Ostia, 310-312 AD, Officina T=3, 6.33g. RIC-26 (R; officina T cited only from Voetter’s Gerin catalogue), C-17 (15Fr; citing Gneechi). OBV: IMP MAXENTIVS DIVO MAXIMIANO PATRI, Veiled head right. RX: AETERNA MEMORIA MOSTT, Domed, six-columned shrine; shields on and above doors. Some red incrustation on obverse and reverse. EF. Rare 650 DIVUS CONSTANTIUS I (Died 306 AD) 603. Follis struck by Maxentius, 306-312 AD, Aquileia, 307-310 AD, Officina P=1, 6.73g. R 1C- 127 corr (S). OBV: DIVO CONSTANTIO AVG, Veiled head right. RX: MEMORIA DIVI CONSTANTI AQP, Eagle atop altar enclosure. Some flatness on beard. Considerable silvering. Near Mint State 450 604.

    Read more

    Harlan J. Berk, Ltd. 105th Buy or Bid Sale

    Highlight: six-columned temple. RIC-29 (R2), C-2 (8 Fr). Very rare RIC cites Officina S only from Voetter’s Gerin catalogue Mint State/EF 300 551. GALERIUS as Caesar; 293-305 AD, Follis, Lugdunum, c. 301-3 AD, 9 83g. RIC VI-1 64b Mint State 220 552. GALERIUS as Caesar; 293-305 AD. Follis, Siscia, c 301 AD RIC-135b r. EF 110 553. GALERIUS as Caesar; 293-305 AD, Follis, Heraclea, c. 297-298 AD RIC- 20b A. EF 110 554 GALERIUS as Augustus; 305-311 AD, Follis, Thessalonica, c 308-310 AD. RIC-30a A (C2) = 40 a. Mint State 130 555 GALERIUS; 305-311 AD, Follis, Nicomedia, c 12/308-5/310 AD RIC-54a A Mint State 130 556. GALERIUS; 305-311 AD, Follis, Cyzicus, c. 308-309 AD. RIC-42 B. Mint State 250 557. DIVUS GALERIUS; Died 311 AD, Follis struck by Maxentius (306-312 AD), Rome, c. 311 AD, 6.77g; Officina Q = 4

    Read more

    The Minot Collection

    Highlight: 713 Rare Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Gold Temple Award Medal — Dies by George T. Morgan Awarded to American Magical Realist Painter O. Louis Guglielmi Joseph E. Temple Trust Fund Medal, Founded 1880, Awarded 1952. 18 karat gold, 54.2mm, 92 grams (2.9581 Troy oz.) By George T. Morgan. Obv. Frock-coated bust with huge mutton-chop whis- kers r. of Joseph E. Temple, Philadelphia merchant, arts patron and member of the Board of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. MORGAN SC. on truncation. Rev. Standing Genius of American Art crowns youthful painter in Renaissance dress holding a figure sketch. Her left hand supports an oval shield bearing the incuse names of great American artists COPLEY, STUART, TRUMBULL, ALLSTON, Academy building and Venus de Milo in background. The raised border

    Read more

    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1897

    Highlight: who was grow- ing a little more collected as they attained a greater dis- tance from the temple. “ One evening, a spring evening as it mightbe to-day, Dimitri of our village, whom I know, was driving iris sheep down from the hill above the tem- ple, where the beacon will be, aud being later than he knew, the sun had set ere lie came down to where the temple stands; and as he could not drive the sheep in the dark down the glen, he bethought himself to encamp there, for the night was warm, and he had food enough with him, and wine, for two men. Inside the temple is of two rooms, and into the liinderinost of these he penned the sheep, and in the other he lit a sparkle of fire and sat to eat his supper. And having finished his supper, he lay down to sleep; but no sleep came near him, and,

    Read more

    COINSWEEKLY ARTICLE SPURS CLEANUP OF GREEK TEMPLE SITE

    04/22/2012

    Highlight: COINSWEEKLY ARTICLE SPURS CLEANUP OF GREEK TEMPLE SITE http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v15n17a17.html

    Can a blog change the world? Maybe a small piece of it. An earlier article in CoinsWeekly stirred Greek officials into action, finally allowing local activists to perform a much-needed cleanup on an ancient temple site unearthed in 2000 in the city of Thessaloniki. Congratulations! -Editor

    A short time ago we reported in CoinsWeekly on an intriguing temple of Aphrodite in the heart of Thessaloniki, a temple that, alas!, was sinking into rubbish because the responsible Archaeological Service did not do anything to preserve and conserve it. A citizen initiativ

    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 18-19

    /1972

    Highlight: it was not technical difficulties which compelled die-engravers to depict on their coins temple facades with fewer columns than actually existed. Even the very largest temple could be represented accurately on the smallest flan. A coin of Tarsus struck under Marcus Aurelius (Plate XI, 3, BMCLycaonia, pi. 34 no. 11) correctly shows the decastyle facade of the “Tomb of Sardanapalus.”^^ When the number of columns possessed by a temple is reduced in its numismatic representation, the reason is not technical limitation but iconographic convenience: some other aspect of the temple seemed to the die-engraver more important and deserving of emphasis. It follows that although coins may illustrate a reduced number of columns, there is no reason why they should exag- gerate or show more columns than

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 34, no. 5 (September-October 2001)

    /2001

    Highlight: or Har Ha'bayit (the Temple Mount) in Hebrew. It is here that once stood the First Temple (Solomon's Temple, 960-587 B.C.) and the Second Temple (538 BC-70 A.D.). AH that remains today is the Western Wall (Hebrew, Ha'kotel Ha'maaravi), or "Wailing Wall," which is a section of the defense rampart which encircled the Temple Court. As a retaining wall, a large portion of the wall is buried below ground level which may actually date from the First Temple. The "Wailing Wall" name was applied to it because Jews came here pray and bewail the destruction of the Temple and their subsequent exile. Muslims refer to the Western Wall as Halt al-Buraq (the Buraq Wall) after the place where Muhammad's half mule-half donkey with wings, named al-Buraq (the Lightning), waited while Muhammad was escorted by

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 42, no. 5 (September-October 2009)

    /2009

    Highlight: I spent two days at the Temple Mount Sifting Project in Jerusalem. I was able to sort through artifacts that had been taken from the Temple Mount in search of coins and treasures from the past. I became part of the first archaeological project that has EVER examined artifacts from the Temple Mount. The story begins in October, 1999, when the Islamic Wakf, the Moslem trust, conducted an illegal and archeologically damaging construction operation on the south-east comer of the Temple Mount. During this operation, 10,000 tons of mbble, bursting with archeological wealth relevant to Jewish, Christian and Moslem history, was removed by heavy machinery and unceremoniously dumped by tmcks into the nearby Kidron Valley. Starting in November, 2004, Bar Ilan University archeology professor Dr.

    Read more

    TAMS Journal, Vol. 18, No. 3

    1/6/1978

    Highlight: feeling that the Chicago Temple was a great venture in Gods work as defined by the W.C.T.U. constitution. To Matilda B. Carse, the Chicago Temple.M.C.A. board ruled that the organization’s Farwell hall could no longer be used for meetings and activities of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, activities that had been held there for the previous nine years. The reason for this action by the Y.M.C.A. is not known, but the direct result was creation of the Chicago Temple. The Temple itself, a handsome office building at the corner of Monroe and LaSalle Streets, was constructed in 1890—1892 at a cost of $1,265,000, a huge sum in the era of

    Read more

    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 18-19

    /1972

    Highlight: it was not technical difficulties which compelled die-engravers to depict on their coins temple facades with fewer columns than actually existed. Even the very largest temple could be represented accurately on the smallest flan. A coin of Tarsus struck under Marcus Aurelius (Plate XI, 3, BMCLycaonia, pi. 34 no. 11) correctly shows the decastyle facade of the “Tomb of Sardanapalus.”^^ When the number of columns possessed by a temple is reduced in its numismatic representation, the reason is not technical limitation but iconographic convenience: some other aspect of the temple seemed to the die-engraver more important and deserving of emphasis. It follows that although coins may illustrate a reduced number of columns, there is no reason why they should exag- gerate or show more columns than

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 34, no. 5 (September-October 2001)

    /2001

    Highlight: or Har Ha'bayit (the Temple Mount) in Hebrew. It is here that once stood the First Temple (Solomon's Temple, 960-587 B.C.) and the Second Temple (538 BC-70 A.D.). AH that remains today is the Western Wall (Hebrew, Ha'kotel Ha'maaravi), or "Wailing Wall," which is a section of the defense rampart which encircled the Temple Court. As a retaining wall, a large portion of the wall is buried below ground level which may actually date from the First Temple. The "Wailing Wall" name was applied to it because Jews came here pray and bewail the destruction of the Temple and their subsequent exile. Muslims refer to the Western Wall as Halt al-Buraq (the Buraq Wall) after the place where Muhammad's half mule-half donkey with wings, named al-Buraq (the Lightning), waited while Muhammad was escorted by

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 42, no. 5 (September-October 2009)

    /2009

    Highlight: I spent two days at the Temple Mount Sifting Project in Jerusalem. I was able to sort through artifacts that had been taken from the Temple Mount in search of coins and treasures from the past. I became part of the first archaeological project that has EVER examined artifacts from the Temple Mount. The story begins in October, 1999, when the Islamic Wakf, the Moslem trust, conducted an illegal and archeologically damaging construction operation on the south-east comer of the Temple Mount. During this operation, 10,000 tons of mbble, bursting with archeological wealth relevant to Jewish, Christian and Moslem history, was removed by heavy machinery and unceremoniously dumped by tmcks into the nearby Kidron Valley. Starting in November, 2004, Bar Ilan University archeology professor Dr.

    Read more

    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 45]

    /1891

    Highlight: Temple and W. J. Griffin, in their own right and as partners, trading as Griffin & Temple, Wilson S. Temple and W. K, Etheridge, administrator of J. R. Ether- idge, deceased, to recover on a promissory note, of which the following is a copy: “$400. Norfolk, V a., March 23d, 1889. Sixty days after date we jointly and severally promise to pay Griffin & Temple four hun- dred dollars, for value received, and we, the maker or makers, indorser or indorsers, hereby waive the benefit of our homestead exemptions as to this debt. [Signed] W. O.' Tempi.e. W. J. Griffin. Wilson S. Temple. J. R. Etheridge.” This note was indorsed by Griffin & Temple on the day named to plaintiff bank. It was executed and delivered to W. O. Temple i

    Read more

    TAMS Journal, Vol. 18, No. 3

    1/6/1978

    Highlight: feeling that the Chicago Temple was a great venture in Gods work as defined by the W.C.T.U. constitution. To Matilda B. Carse, the Chicago Temple.M.C.A. board ruled that the organization’s Farwell hall could no longer be used for meetings and activities of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, activities that had been held there for the previous nine years. The reason for this action by the Y.M.C.A. is not known, but the direct result was creation of the Chicago Temple. The Temple itself, a handsome office building at the corner of Monroe and LaSalle Streets, was constructed in 1890—1892 at a cost of $1,265,000, a huge sum in the era of

    Read more

    Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., 145th Buy or Bid Sale

    Highlight: Rx: Temple with four columns enclosing cult statue of Diana of Ephesus; in field, DIAN EPHE. About EF 3500 452. CLAUDIUS I; 41-54 AD, Cistophoric Tetradrachm/3 Denarii, Ephesus?, 10.63g., RPC-2222, BM-229, RIC-118, C-30 (30 Fr.). Obv: Tl CLAVD CAES AVG, Bare head I., Rx: Temple with four columns enclosing cult statue of Diana of Ephesus; in field, DIAN EPHE. VF 1500 453. CLAUDIUS I AND AGRIPPINA II; Died 54 AD, Cistophoric Tetradrachm/3 Denarii, Ephesus, 51 AD, 10.61g., RPC-2223, BM-234, RIC-117, C-2 (120 Fr.). Obv: Tl CLAVD CAESAR AVG P M TR P X IMP XIIX, Laureate head r., Rx: AGRIPPINAAVGVSTACAESARIS AVG, Draped bust of Agrippina II r. VF 3000 454. CLAUDIUS I AND AGRIPPINA II; Died 54 AD, Cistophoric Tetradrachm/3 Denarii, Ephesus, 51 AD, 11.04g., RPC-2224, RIC-119, BM-231, C-1 (120 Fr.)

    Read more

    Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., 168th Buy or Bid Sale

    Highlight: Rx: Temple with two columns, inscribed ROM ET AVG, enclosing figure of Augustus crowned by female figure holding cornucopia; in field COM - ASI. Rare with countermark of Vespasian: RPC-2221 records only two such countermarked specimens, in Munich and Vienna. VF 1400 368. CLAUDIUS I AND AGRIPPINA II; Died 54 AD, Cistophoric Tetradrachm, Ephesus, 51 AD, ll.OOg., RPC-2224, RIC-119, BM-231. Obv: Tl CLAVD CAES AVG AGRIPP AVG VSTA Laureate head of Claudius and draped bust of Agrippina II jugate left. Rx: DIANA - EPHESIA Facing cult statue of Diana of Ephesus. Fine + 2000 369. TITUS; 79-81 AD, Cistophoric Tetradrachm, Probably Rome Mint for circulation in Asia, 81 AD, 11.08g., RIC-516 (R), BM-149, C-398 (150 Fr.), RPC-861 (7 spec.). Obv: IMP TITVS CAES - VESPASIAN AVG P M. Head laureate r. Rx: No

    Read more

    Harlan J. Berk, Ltd. 100th Buy or Bid Sale

    Highlight: six-columned temple. Scarce consular obverse legend. Scrape across cheek. About EF. Very Rare bust variant 1200 580. Another; 6.0 1g. VF 500 Follis, Aquileia, 309 AD, Officina S=2, 6.97g. RIC-125 (S), C-33 (lOFr). OBV: Consular bust right holding eagle-tipped scepter, CONS II in legend. RX: CONSERV VRB SVAE AQS, Roma seated in six-columned templeicina variant of RIC-204 (R2; Officina S=2 only, citing unique coin in National Museum, Malta; figures in pediment described as “Dioscuri flanked by River-Gods"). RX: CONSERV VRB SVAE RP H, Roma seated left in six-columned temple; in pediment, standing figures of Jupiter (?) holding globe and scepter and Flercules (?) holding club and globe, each with a

    Read more

    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2005

    Highlight: GUTHRUM AND THE EARLIEST DANELAW COINAGES 37 Temple / Cross and four pellets type £3. Cc +ED-EL:R'E-D* RE +BEORNHAE Templeoss with pellet in each angle; beaded inner circle (a) British Museum, pre-1834 acquisition ( BMC II, p. 3 1 , no. 47); found at ‘Seafield Churchyard' Hawkins 1841, pp,34, pi. 7, 89; Haigh 1845. 19, 2; Doljey 1962, p, 322 and pi. 16, 2; Dolley 1965, pi. 1,1. 1.40 g (21.6 gr) 160°. «4. Dd XEDEIREI1RE (first R incomplete) +AAII1EVOV11I Temple with double pediment Cross with pellet in each angle; beaded inner circle (a) Assheton collection (deposited at the British Museum; Blunt MS list 72); ex Cuerdale hoard (Hardy MS -), Hawkins 1842. p, 99; Haigh 1845, pp. viii and I9,and pi. 5, no. 3. 1.28 g(19.8 gr) 340°. IN THE NAME OF KING OSWALD XT / Cross

    Read more

    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2005

    Highlight: GUTHRUM AND THE EARLIEST DANELAW COINAGES 37 Temple / Cross and four pellets type £3. Cc +ED-EL:R'E-D* RE +BEORNHAE Templeoss with pellet in each angle; beaded inner circle (a) British Museum, pre-1834 acquisition ( BMC II, p. 3 1 , no. 47); found at ‘Seafield Churchyard' Hawkins 1841, pp,34, pi. 7, 89; Haigh 1845. 19, 2; Doljey 1962, p, 322 and pi. 16, 2; Dolley 1965, pi. 1,1. 1.40 g (21.6 gr) 160°. «4. Dd XEDEIREI1RE (first R incomplete) +AAII1EVOV11I Temple with double pediment Cross with pellet in each angle; beaded inner circle (a) Assheton collection (deposited at the British Museum; Blunt MS list 72); ex Cuerdale hoard (Hardy MS -), Hawkins 1842. p, 99; Haigh 1845, pp. viii and I9,and pi. 5, no. 3. 1.28 g(19.8 gr) 340°. IN THE NAME OF KING OSWALD XT / Cross

    Read more

    MORE ON THE 1864 BOSTON MASONIC TEMPLE HALF DOLLAR

    01/18/2015

    Highlight: MORE ON THE 1864 BOSTON MASONIC TEMPLE HALF DOLLAR http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v18n03a21.html

    Back in June we published an article by Len Augsburger on the rare 1864 Boston Masonic Templewith different obverse engraving) will be offered in the Stack's Bowers New York Americana Sale. Here's a blog post from the Stack's Bowers site by Greg Cohen -Editor

    TempleBS), on Flickr">1864 Boston Masonic <b style=Temple Half Dollar" />

    The description penned by

    Back in June we published an article by Len Augsburger on the rare 1864 Boston Ma

    Read more

    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 18-19

    /1972

    Highlight: TEMPLES ON GREEK IMPERIAL COINAGE 31 The manner in which coins depict the columns of templerity of numismatic representations of temples show the buildings in a strictly frontal \dew. The reason for this will become apparent from a comparison of four coins struck in the reigns of Nero (Plate XI, 4, Vienna), An- toninus Pius (Plate XI, 5-6, Vienna and SNGFiizwilliam 4441) and Trajan Decius (Plate XI, 7, Vienna), which depict the octastyle temple of Artemis at Ephesus. The first of these shows the temple in a three- quarter view with a facade of four columns; this method of depicting a temple suffered from the disadvantage of being more difficult to execute successfully than a simple frontal representation; it also afforded a cen- tra

    Read more

    Numismatic Notes and Monographs, nos. 103-109

    1/1/1947

    Highlight: 8 THE TEMPLE OF ARTEMIS stnicted with reasonable certainty. However, the details of the superstructure are still a matter of controversy. Such reconstructions as have been suggested have been made largely on the basis of the sculptured pieces and other fragments of the temple now in the British Museum. The most recent pro- posals are admittedly based on indirect evidence: on an analogy with another famous sanctuary, the templehitects, 3rd ser., 16 (1908-09) 538-540; W. R. Lethaby. Greek Buildings, Represented in Fragments in the British Museum, London. 1908, pp. 1-36; Lethaby, "The Sculpture of the Later Temple of Artemis at

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 24, no. 1 (January-February 1991)

    /1991

    Highlight: of this western support wall of the Temple Mount.) The Antiquities Department granted per- mission for the excavation, apparently as a sop to head off interference by rabbinical elements with the massive archeological excavations being carried out at the southern end of the Templennel became the private domain of the ministry. The rabbi of the Western Wall, Yehuda- Getz, would rise before dawn each day and unlock the tunnel gate to pray by himself at a point reckoned to be opposite where the Holy of Holies had stood in the ancient temple. Dignitaries and special groups would

    Read more

    The Shekel, vol. 47, no. 1

    1/1/2014

    Highlight: OF TEMPLEerences of faith, doctrine, and behavior. The non-specificity of symbolic objects is of great, one might even say essential, value in matters of religion where the very basis of faith and hence of au- thenticity is veiled in mystery and perhaps best left so. The symbolism of national iden- tity, too, provides a broad umbrella under which rather diverse groups may press together. Solomon’s Temple, once a con- crete reality, but now long de- stroyed along with its several suc- cessors, has led a highly ramified symbolic afterlife. Unlike the crucifix, however, the symbolism of the Temple of Jeru-

    Read more

    The Augur, Vol. 2, No. 5 (16)

    1/5/1978

    Highlight: I Maccabees 4:54 recounts the rededication of the Temple by Judah Maccabee in 165 B.C.E.: "At the very time of the year and on the very day on which the Greeks had profaned the altar, it was dedicated to the sound of singing and harps and lyres and cymbals. Some scholars attribute the compostion of Psalm 1 1 8 (a psalm of victory) to this feast of dedication. ^ It tells of a victorious procession of the people to the Temple (verses 1-1 8). Significantly, this Psalm forms the concluding part of the Hallel, a prayer of praise and thanksgiving sung at the Temple service and public celebrations. The prayer is accompanied by the carrying of palm branches by the people (the reverse of several lyre coin types bears the palm branch). To this day, the Hallel is recited in its entirety during

    Read more

    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 33, No.2

    1/2/1998

    Highlight: VI: INDIAN TEMPLE TOKENS AND THE MYSTERY OF 913 Bob Forrest, Manchester, England, NI # 2382 I had heard the expression "temple token" used quite freely over the years, and indeed had often used it myself, but without really knowing what it meant. At the back of my mind I had vaguely imagined that these things were somehow used as a money substitute (hence "token") in association with temple ceremonies - a symbolic offering, perhaps (1). Possibly some readers have formed similarly vague notions of their own. It was only when I came to look at templet they really were, finding, in the process, that my vague home-made notions of their use were really quite erroneous. "Temple token"

    Read more

    Numismatic Notes and Monographs, nos. 103-109

    1/1/1947

    Highlight: 8 THE TEMPLE OF ARTEMIS stnicted with reasonable certainty. However, the details of the superstructure are still a matter of controversy. Such reconstructions as have been suggested have been made largely on the basis of the sculptured pieces and other fragments of the temple now in the British Museum. The most recent pro- posals are admittedly based on indirect evidence: on an analogy with another famous sanctuary, the templehitects, 3rd ser., 16 (1908-09) 538-540; W. R. Lethaby. Greek Buildings, Represented in Fragments in the British Museum, London. 1908, pp. 1-36; Lethaby, "The Sculpture of the Later Temple of Artemis at

    Read more
      Page 1 of 418
      NNP is 100% non-profit and independent // Your feedback is essential and welcome. // Your feedback is essential and welcome.

      Contact Us

      • NNPCurator@wustl.edu

      • c/o Washington University Libraries
        One Brookings Drive
        Campus Box 1061
        St. Louis, MO 63130

      About Us

      The Newman Numismatic Portal is located at Washington University in St. Louis and funded by the Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society. The NNP is dedicated to becoming the primary and most comprehensive resource for numismatic research and reference material, initially concentrating on U.S. Coinage and Currency. Contact us with suggestions and corrections.

      Find out more

      Copyright 2017 © EPNNES & Washington University in St. Louis