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    Virginia halfpenny

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 150

    1/12/2012

    Highlight: 25-M Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. The edges of the coin are rolled slightly to produce a smooth edge and a slightly raised rim around the edge. 25.1 mm, 115.9 grains, coin turn. B. 25-M Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. 25.0 mm, 111.0 grains, coin turn. C. 23-Q Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. 25.0 mm, 108.7 grains, coin turn. D. 27-J Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. 25.0 mm, 116.8 grains, coin turn. E. 27-J Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. The edges of the coin are rolled slightly to

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 150

    1/12/2012

    Highlight: 25-M Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. The edges of the coin are rolled slightly to produce a smooth edge and a slightly raised rim around the edge. 25.1 mm, 115.9 grains, coin turn. B. 25-M Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. 25.0 mm, 111.0 grains, coin turn. C. 23-Q Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. 25.0 mm, 108.7 grains, coin turn. D. 27-J Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. 25.0 mm, 116.8 grains, coin turn. E. 27-J Virginia halfpenny “with point” after GEORGIVS on obverse and seven-stringed harp on reverse. The edges of the coin are rolled slightly to

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    The March 2012 Baltimore Auction

    Highlight: 1086 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 4-G, W-1460. 7 Harp Strings. No Period After GEORGIVS. MS-64 RB (PCGS). CAC. Satin tan with considerable mint red present. The strike is sharp and there are no carbon spots or stains, keeping the eye appeal high. Examination finds only a hint of fading in the color, and traces of die rust common to this variety in the fields. PCGS# 244. 1087 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 20-X, W-1670. 8 Harp Strings. Period After GEORGIVS. MS-63 RB (PCGS). OGH. About a third of the original mint red remains, with the balance of the color fading to light tan to brown. Sharply and attractive, with no detracting marks or spots. Highly col- lectible early copper with mint red remaining is always a de- light to see, especially from this early period in our history. PCGS#

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: 182 1773 Virginia Halfpennyown surfaces exhibit some olive-brown highlights. No more than a few scattered ticks come to light under low magnification, with the overall naked eye appearance substantial. A pleasing example of the type and grade combination, one that compares favorably to Ford: 1 1 0 (Stack's, January 2005). PCGS# 240. From the Ted L. Craige Collection. Paper envelope included. 183 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 20-X, W-1670. 8 Harp Strings, Period After GEORGIVS. MS-63 RD (PCGS). 118.5 grains. A classic representative example of the type with bold mint-orange surfaces that offer a touch of rose toning on the high points. Struck from rusted dies, the evi- dence

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: Stack's Bowers Galleries The March 2013 Baltimore Auction 188 1773 Virginia Halfpenny After GEORGIVS. AD Details — Smoothed (PCGS). 109.1 grains. Deep chestnut-brown surfaces exhibit warm olive toning throughout. A hint of smoothing can be seen on the obverse behind the effigy's head, otherwise the surfaces are choice and mark-free to the unaided eye. PCGS# 240. From the Ted L Craige Collection. Paper envelope included. 189 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 24-K, W-1570. 7 Harp Strings, Period After GEORGIVS. MS-64 BN (PCGS). 1 16.4 grains. Struck from a clashed obverse die. Somewhat glossy golden-tan surfaces exhibit rich mint-orange high- lights among the protected design areas, especially on the obverse. No marks of any great measure are seen,

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    United States Coins: Early American Coins, Paper Money

    Highlight: EARLY AMERICAN COINS *62 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. N.25-M. Stop after GEOR- GIYS. Extremely Fine. Error: large planchet cutter clip at top of obverse. 110.9 gns. Errors as major as this are extremely rare in the Virginia series, the Tower Mint usually caught them before they were released. Lot No. 63 63 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. No stop after GEORGIVS. Uncirculated, prooflike. 110.4 gns. Cleaned. From Bowers and Merena’s March 28, 1990 sale, lot 1042. *64 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Stop after GEORGIVS. Choice Uncirculated, red and brown. 121.9 gns. *65 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Another. Stop after GEOR- GIVS. Choice Uncirculated, nearly full red. 122.2 gns. *66 1773 Virginia Halfpennyncirculated, red and brown. 121.7 gns. 67 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. A third. Uncirculated, brown with

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    The Minot Collection

    Highlight: VIRGINIA HALFPENNIES 35 1773 Virginia halfpenny areas of the devices and light brown to darker brown on the high points of the design motifs and lettering. Fields are subtly reflective and free of major distractions — some shallow marks have blended into the coloration at King George's neck, and a trio of bacteria-shaped carbon spots are found above rightmost fleur-de-lys on the reverse. A remarkably appealing Virginia halfpenny absent the major carbon flecking that might be found on a specimen hosting more mint red. 38 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Period after GEORGIVS, 7 Harp Strings. MS-62 BN. 118.1 grains. A sharp and very well

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: Stack's Bowers Galleries The March 2013 Baltimore Auction 165 1773 Virginia Halfpennyve Choice AU specimen exhibit deep chocolate-brown high points. Swelling noted at RGI and the shield border there, a diagnostic of this elusive variety. Some deep black detritus clings to the X in REX, otherwise the surfaces are free of disturbances worthy of mention. PCGS# 243. From the Ted L Craige Collection. Paper envelope included. 166 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 5-Z, W-1600. 8 Harp Strings, No Period After GEORGIVS. AU-55 (PCGS). 117.9 grains. The deep olive-brown surfaces exhibit fairly bold devices and some light, old toned-over scratches on the obverse

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    The March 2016 Baltimore Auction, U.S. Coins

    Highlight: Virginia Coinage 12132 1773 Virginia Halfpenny AU-58-i- BN (PCGS). Toned in a blend of deep copper and somewhat lighter medium brown, both sides of this premium Choice AU exhibit a smooth satin texture. A boldly defined and appealing example that is sure to be of interest to the discerning bidder. PCGS# 243. NGC ID: 2ATK. From our (Stacks) Minot Collection sale, May 2008, lot 39. Lot tag in- cluded. 12133 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 21-N, W-1545. Period After GEORGIVS, 7 Harp Strings. MS-63 BN (PCGS). A boldly defined and satiny example with much to offer both the type collector and specialist in this early Colonial era series. Predominantly copper brown in appearance, a few swirls of deeper color (some associated with ligh

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: are not aware of any Virginia halfpenny with an obverse to reverse die orientation other than 180°. EXAMINATION: The most important method for determining authentic Virginia halfpenny coinage is the look of the coin. The subtle nuances of the devices, the pattern of the legends, the texture of the copper, and the general patina, all interact to create a Gestalt that says real or fake. An example of a genuine Virginia halfpennyevaluating a worn or lower grade coin, where the handiwork of the original minters is not as clear or evident. It must be emphasized that one of the most important parts of a Virginia halfpenny to evaluate when determining its authenticity is its third side - the edge. Virginia halfpenny planchets were

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: are not aware of any Virginia halfpenny with an obverse to reverse die orientation other than 180°. EXAMINATION: The most important method for determining authentic Virginia halfpenny coinage is the look of the coin. The subtle nuances of the devices, the pattern of the legends, the texture of the copper, and the general patina, all interact to create a Gestalt that says real or fake. An example of a genuine Virginia halfpennyevaluating a worn or lower grade coin, where the handiwork of the original minters is not as clear or evident. It must be emphasized that one of the most important parts of a Virginia halfpenny to evaluate when determining its authenticity is its third side - the edge. Virginia halfpenny planchets were

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    Fixed Price List: Coins and Currency of Early America

    /1989

    Highlight: 1773 Virginia Halfpennymbly called for a quantity of halfpence to be struck at the Tower Mint in London. By the time the coins were produced, shipped to America, and the appropriate Royal Proclama- tion issued, the Revolutionary War had begun and naturally everyone hoarded their coppers. After the War the coins achieved circulation, as evidenced by the worn specimens encountered today. €53 C53 1773 Virginia Halfpenny.

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    The C. B. Slade, Jr. Estate

    Highlight: #000262 2033 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Newman 4-0, W-1470. No period after GEORGIVS. 7harpstrings. AU-55. 115.3 grains. Fully lustrous and sharply struck. Golden brown toning with hints of blue. Areas of light die rust on the obverse helped to facilitate the variety attri- bution. Almost certainly from the famous Mendes Cohen Hoard which contained thousands of Uncirculated Virginia halfpence from numerous different die combinations. Many examples were gradually dispersed into the numismatic marketplace between 1875 and 1929, after which much of the remaining supply passed into the hands of Wayte Raymond. It appears that by the 1950s that dispersion of the hoard was complete. David Bowers in his Whitman Encyclopedia of Colonial and Early American Coins notes: "Michael J. Hodder (communicatio

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: 2013 159 1773 Virginia Halfpenny on the effigy's forehead, another at the E in REX, as well as a few light toning flecks on the reverse, none of which assail the unaided eye. Choice for the grade despite the minimal blemishes. PCGS# 244. From the Ted L Craige Collection. Purchased from New Nether- lands Coin Co., Inc. at an undisclosed time for the lordly sum of $72.50. Paper envelope included. 160 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 4-G, W-1460. 7 Harp Strings, No Period After GEORGIVS. MS-65 RB (PCGS). 1 1 6.8 grains

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: 2013 172 1773 Virginia Halfpennyhe obverse. A rare variety in any grade above VF; evidently N.8-H was one of the varieties that saw heavy circulation in America and a variety that was not overly represented in any of the hoards of Virginia halfpennies found over the years. PCGS# 243. From the Ted L Craige Collection. Purchased from Richard Picker at an undisclosed time. Paper envelope included. 173 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 9-B, W-1420. 6 Harp Strings, No Period After GEORGIVS. AU-53 (PCGS). 119.1 grains. Deep

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: 178 1773 Virginia HalfpennyNew Obverse." This is probably the discovery specimen of this elusive va- riety. We note no sales records for the variety in the Bowers Encyclopedia. Well worth a spate of bold bidding activity de- spite its PCGS qualifier. PCGS# 243. From the Ted L. Craige Collection. Purchased from Richard Picker at an undisclosed time. Paper envelope included. I f \ 1 [ ] ^ J k. 179 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 13-T

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 7

    Highlight: 1 05 105 1773 Virginia Halfpennyhoice Uncirculated. 117.5 gns. The Newman Plate Coin. A lovely example with about 60% obverse and 85% reverse mint red showing. The obverse is lightly granular while the reverse has one small spot below ‘N’ in the legend. Otherwise this is an exemplary specimen and one well suited for inclusion in a high grade type collection. Ex F. C. C. Boyd Estate. Lot No. 108 108 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. No Period. N.9-B. Fine/ Very Good. 111.8 gns. Both sides are a deep olive brown in color. The obverse shows multiple shallow rim dents while there are two more severe ones noticeable on the reverse at about 3:00 and 9:00. Not a rare variety so it is curious that Boyd never upgraded this coin. Ex F.C.C. Boyd Estate. THE NEWMAN REVERSE PLATE COIN

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 7

    Highlight: Ill 111 1773 Virginia Halfpenny9.0 gns. The Newman Re- verse Plate Coin. The obverse has about 45% mint red color showing while the reverse is about 85% bright red. There are some light flecks on the obverse, one particu- larly below ‘X’ in the legend. The surfaces are lightly granular. Ex Harlan Page Smith Collection (S.H. & H. Chapman, May 8, 1 906, lot 38); F. C. C. Boyd Estate. Lot No. 114 114 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. With Period. N.23-R. Choice Uncirculated. 121.2 gns. A pleasing example, the obverse about 50%, the reverse about 80% mint red. There are a few light obverse flecks, and one or two areas of what might be verdigris. Possibly the Newman reverse plate coin. Ex F. C. C. Boyd Estate. THE NEWMAN REVERSE PLATE COIN Lot No. 112 112

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: August 2007 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 3165 VIRGINIA HALFPENNY COUNTERFEITS, FORGERIES AND FACSIMILES by Roger A. Moore, M. D.; Moorestown, NJ Sydney F. Martin; Doylestown, PA Alan Anthony; Leesburg, VA William Veach; Homosassa, FL INTRODUCTION The production of copies of actual coinage for both legal and often illegal purposes has been in existence for nearly as long as the minting of coins. 1 Contemporary made copies of coins are usually produced of baser, cheaper metals in an attempt to pass them commercially as real coins, thereby producing an illegal profit for the coiner. Copies made at a later date have usually been produced for the enjoyment of the coin collector to fill the place of a rare and needed variety, or to fool the collector into paying an excessive amount fo

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: It has been theorized that the 1 776 law was specifically aimed at protecting the Virginia halfpenny coinage which entered circulation in 1775. 10 Another possibility for the lack of contemporary counterfeiting of the Virginia halfpenny coinage was its delayed release into circulation and at a time that saw coinage utilized to only a limited extent. We know the Virginia halfpence arrived in Virginia from the Royal Mint in London on February 14, 1774; however, they were not released into circulation until March of 1775, some 50 days prior to the start of the American Revolution. 6 The apparent lack of circulation of the Virginia copper halfpence even caused Thomas Jefferson to incorrectly observe that “In Virginia, copper coins have never been in use.” 13 One can understand Jefferson’s

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: Variety 1 0-W : An initial report of a 10-W variety Virginia halfpenny as being cast 27 was incorrect. The determination of the coin as cast was made based on what ap- peared to be a casting port on the coin’s edge and the smeared look of the devices on the coin’s sur- face (see Figure 6). In preparing this paper, further evaluation of the coin was undertaken includ- ing CAT scanning. The results of that evaluation are shown in Table 2. The coin’s weight of 1 08 grains falls within the expected range for genuine Virginia halfpence, especially in worn condition. 15 Similarly, the x-axis diameter of 24.9 mm and the y-axis diameter of 24.7 mm are both at the lower end but within the range for a genuine coin. Of importance, the specific gravity of 8.71 is solidly within the normal range and

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: August 2007 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 3176 with the basic knowledge of what a true Virginia halfpenny looks like, hopefully the CNL readership can avoid the pitfall of buying a fake Virginia halfpenny as their type coin. CRUDE FACS I Ml LIES - Though the origin of some crude facsimiles is unknown, they are so poorly made that they could have served as prizes in Cracker Jack boxes (see Figure 7). Only someone with no knowledge of early Ameri- can coins in general, and the Vir- ginia coinage specifically, would be fooled by these poor copies. ROSA REPRODUCTIONS - Per- haps the most prolific producer of modern reproductions of the Vir- ginia halfpence coinage was Peter J. Rosa. 30 3132 In 1955, Rosa founded the Becker Manufactur- ing Company, which was named afterthe infamous

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: August 2007 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 3165 VIRGINIA HALFPENNY COUNTERFEITS, FORGERIES AND FACSIMILES by Roger A. Moore, M. D.; Moorestown, NJ Sydney F. Martin; Doylestown, PA Alan Anthony; Leesburg, VA William Veach; Homosassa, FL INTRODUCTION The production of copies of actual coinage for both legal and often illegal purposes has been in existence for nearly as long as the minting of coins. 1 Contemporary made copies of coins are usually produced of baser, cheaper metals in an attempt to pass them commercially as real coins, thereby producing an illegal profit for the coiner. Copies made at a later date have usually been produced for the enjoyment of the coin collector to fill the place of a rare and needed variety, or to fool the collector into paying an excessive amount fo

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: It has been theorized that the 1 776 law was specifically aimed at protecting the Virginia halfpenny coinage which entered circulation in 1775. 10 Another possibility for the lack of contemporary counterfeiting of the Virginia halfpenny coinage was its delayed release into circulation and at a time that saw coinage utilized to only a limited extent. We know the Virginia halfpence arrived in Virginia from the Royal Mint in London on February 14, 1774; however, they were not released into circulation until March of 1775, some 50 days prior to the start of the American Revolution. 6 The apparent lack of circulation of the Virginia copper halfpence even caused Thomas Jefferson to incorrectly observe that “In Virginia, copper coins have never been in use.” 13 One can understand Jefferson’s

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: Variety 1 0-W : An initial report of a 10-W variety Virginia halfpenny as being cast 27 was incorrect. The determination of the coin as cast was made based on what ap- peared to be a casting port on the coin’s edge and the smeared look of the devices on the coin’s sur- face (see Figure 6). In preparing this paper, further evaluation of the coin was undertaken includ- ing CAT scanning. The results of that evaluation are shown in Table 2. The coin’s weight of 1 08 grains falls within the expected range for genuine Virginia halfpence, especially in worn condition. 15 Similarly, the x-axis diameter of 24.9 mm and the y-axis diameter of 24.7 mm are both at the lower end but within the range for a genuine coin. Of importance, the specific gravity of 8.71 is solidly within the normal range and

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: August 2007 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 3176 with the basic knowledge of what a true Virginia halfpenny looks like, hopefully the CNL readership can avoid the pitfall of buying a fake Virginia halfpenny as their type coin. CRUDE FACS I Ml LIES - Though the origin of some crude facsimiles is unknown, they are so poorly made that they could have served as prizes in Cracker Jack boxes (see Figure 7). Only someone with no knowledge of early Ameri- can coins in general, and the Vir- ginia coinage specifically, would be fooled by these poor copies. ROSA REPRODUCTIONS - Per- haps the most prolific producer of modern reproductions of the Vir- ginia halfpence coinage was Peter J. Rosa. 30 3132 In 1955, Rosa founded the Becker Manufactur- ing Company, which was named afterthe infamous

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    Selections from the Estate of Louis E. Eliasberg, Jr. and the Collection of Chester L. Krause

    Highlight: #000246 2078 Trio of 1773 Virginia halfpennyrown, lightly porous, old cuts at reverse center ☆ Newman 9-B, W-1420. No Period. VG-8. Evenly porous surfaces have turned somewhat smooth through wear and a thin coating of lacquer(?) ☆ Newman 22-S, W-1550. No Period. VG-8. Uniformly porous. (Total: 3 pieces) From the Peter Scherff Collection of Colonial Coins; purchased privately from Bruce Miller, 1989. 2079 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Newman 6-X, W-1610. No Period. VF-25. 123.4 gns. Virginia halfpence are usually quite dark, this piece is actually a pleasing light ruddy brown. Scattered circulation marks are noted on this wonderful mid-grade type coin. From the Peter Scherff Collection of Colonial Coins; purchased privately from Bruce

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    Early American Coin Session, in cooperation with The Colonial Coin Collectors Club

    Highlight: Virginia Halfpence 6389 1773 Virginia Halfpennybrown surfaces reveal no serious marks to the un- assisted eye. Variety with a long die line from the bottom of the V in VIRGINIA, and with the first I of that word boldly double-punched, the earlier I connected to the rim, the later I lower and in its normal position within the word. PCGS# 243. Paper envelope with consignor's attribution notes included. 6390 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 21-N, W-1545. 7 Harp Strings, Period After GEORGIVS. MS-62 BN (PCGS). 112.19 grains. A glossy and hard golden-brown specimen with soft luster and no readily noticeable marks. We note a small patch of coal-black patination between I and R on the reverse, otherwise th

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    The February 2014 Americana Auction

    Highlight: Virginia Coinage Exceptional Gem Uncirculated 1773 Virginia Halfpenny 281 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 7-D, W-1480. No Period After GEORGIVS, 7 Harp Strings. MS-66 BN (PCGS). CAC. This undeniably PQ Gem exhibits glassy semi-prooflike fields and razor sharp devices. A kaleidoscopic iridescence of indigo, teal and magenta springs to life under a light source, with traces of original red luster also evident in the more protected areas of the design. The Virginia halfpennies dated 1773 were struck by the Crown in England for intended use in the colony of Virginia. This series represents the only issue of colonial-era coinage that can be found by todays collectors in various states of Uncirculated, up to and including the Gem level. The present Gem is tied for finest BN of the type certified

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    The August 2016 ANA Auction, U.S. Coins

    Highlight: Auction Virginia Coinage 1136 1773 Virginia Halfpenny GEORGIVS, 7 Harp Strings. MS-63 BN (NGC). 106.5 grains. A delightful Choice Uncirculated piece with glints of original rose-orange luster peering from otherwise originally toned, gray-brown surfaces. Well struck apart from a touch of softness to the central reverse detail, this impressively pedigreed example would serve equally well in a Mint State type set or Virginia halfpennyows 143rd Sale, September 1 909, lot 59; Eric R Newman Numismatic Education Society; Heritages sale of the Eric R Newman Collection, Rart IV, May 2014, lot 30007. 1137 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 23-R, W-1565. Period After

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    The Americana Sale: United States Coins, Medals and Paper Money

    Highlight: #000173 VIRGINIA HALFPENCE 6411 1773 Virginia halfpennyent red on the reverse. Nicely struck with good center to reverse shield. Some little scattered spots and a hint of toning on George's jaw. Exceptional visual appeal, a very pretty example of this pre- Revolutionary War coinage for Virginia. From the George Palis Collection; previously from Boivers and Merena’s sale of January J995, Lot 2209. #000244 6412 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Newman 5-Z. With Period, 8 Harp Strings. Choice Very Fine-30. 103.1 grains. 24.8 mm. Superb glossy medium brown with choice, smooth surfaces. A tiny area of surface roughness

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 7

    Highlight: 100 (Enlarged) 100 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. No Period. N.3-F. Choice Uncirculated, nearly Gem. 113.7 gns. The Newman Plate C f oin ' The obve rse is about 50% full red while the reverse is a bright brilliant and blazing red gem. There is a small patch of verdigris on the ‘X’ on the obverse, and another more shallow area on George’s chin. (SEE COLOR PLATE) Ex F.C.C. Boyd Estate. Lot No. 101 101 1773 Virginia Halfpennyample, nearly fully red on the obverse, almost completely red on the reverse. Some light granularity visible, but not at all disturbing. Ex F.C.C. Boyd Estate. Lot No. 103 103 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. No Period. N.5-B. Choice Very Fine. 115.4 gns. Dark olive brown on both sides. Both the obverse and reverse

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 7

    Highlight: 117 (Enlarged) 117 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. With Period. N.25-M. Choice Uncirculated. 121.7 gns. A very pleasing example, the obverse with about 55% blazing red, the reverse nearly fully red. The surfaces are lightly granular but not disturbingly so and the strike is about as sharp as expected on a Virginia halfpenny. Ex F.C.C. Boyd Estate. (Enlarged) Lot No. 118 (Enlarged) 118 1773 Virginia Halfpenny55% mint red showing while the reverse enjoys nearly 85% full original color. There are a few light flecks, principally on the reverse at the base. Ex F. C. C. Boyd Estate. GEM WITH PERIOD VIRGINIA HALFPENNY Lot No. 119 1 19 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. With Period. N.27-J. Gem Uncirculated. 128.8 gns. A really

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 135

    1/12/2007

    Highlight: December 2007 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 31 97 larger than expected for a true Virginia halfpenny. Asampling of 21 genuine Virginia halfpennies shows an expected range of x- axis diameters from 24.9 to 26.1 mm and y-axis diameters from 24.7 to 25.8 mm. The coin’s specific gravity is 8.8 which corre- sponds to a true Vir- ginia halfpenny having a specific gravity range from 8.64 to 8.99. However, the most deceptive part of the coin is the well made bust of King George on the obverse and an exact replication of the crown and shield on the reverse. In addition, the letter punches used to make the obverse and reverse legends look authentic. Of interest, the obverse matches fairly closely to a Newman 7 obverse, except a period or stop has been added after GEORGIVS. Since the Newman

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 135

    1/12/2007

    Highlight: December 2007 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 31 97 larger than expected for a true Virginia halfpenny. Asampling of 21 genuine Virginia halfpennies shows an expected range of x- axis diameters from 24.9 to 26.1 mm and y-axis diameters from 24.7 to 25.8 mm. The coin’s specific gravity is 8.8 which corre- sponds to a true Vir- ginia halfpenny having a specific gravity range from 8.64 to 8.99. However, the most deceptive part of the coin is the well made bust of King George on the obverse and an exact replication of the crown and shield on the reverse. In addition, the letter punches used to make the obverse and reverse legends look authentic. Of interest, the obverse matches fairly closely to a Newman 7 obverse, except a period or stop has been added after GEORGIVS. Since the Newman

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    The September Sale: United States Coins and United States Paper Money

    Highlight: COLONIAL COINS 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 VIRGINIA 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. No period. Uncirculated, lightly iridescent with traces of mint red. 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. No period. As above. A strong Very Fine. 1773 Virginia. Halfpenny. No period. A third. Strictly Fine, brown and black. Scarce. 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Without period. Very Good, with period. Good. 2 pieces. AUCTORI PLEBIS 1787 Auctori Plebis Token. Really Very Fine as all known specimens have a weak obverse. Parts of the reverse are off the planchet, due to the reverse die being too large for the planchets used. KENTUCKY Lot No. 529 (1792) Kentucky Token. Lettered edge. Uncirculated, golden steel and iridescent. Some proof-like surface. A very choice coin from our Emmons Sale in 1969. (1792) Kentucky.

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    The Americana Sale

    Highlight: VIRGINIA HALFPENCE Pair of Virginia halfpennies and a Georgivs Triumpho token: ☆ 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Newman 22-S. Period after GEORGIVS. AU-50, damaged. Edge marks, surface digs, and scratches. Tittle actual wear ☆ 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Newman 8-H. No Period after GEORGIVS. EF-40. Surface granularity ☆ 1783 Georgivs Triumpho token. Baker-7. VG-10. Porous medium brown surfaces. (Total: 3 pieces) 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Period after GEORGIVS. Newman 20-N. VF-35. 116.2 gns. Here is probably what is the 18th century version of the 1883 ''Racketeer nickel" -plate a Virginia halfpenny in a gold-colored wash, and attempt to pass it as an English gold Guinea of the 1760s to 1780s, whose designs the Virginia halfpence resemble. The gold wash still adheres in the fields, but circula- tion

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    The June 2012 Baltimore Auction

    Highlight: 1033 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 4-0, W-1470. No Pe- riod After GEORGIVS. MS-64 BN (PCGS). Satiny golden tan with lively mint orange brilliance among the devices. Choice for the grade with no marks worthy of written con- sideration. Choice for the grade. PCGS# 243. 1034 1773 Virginia Halfpennymen with lively mint orange and golden-tan evenly distributed throughout. A tiny toning spot is seen on the obverse at the S in GEORGIVS, otherwise no marks assail the unaided eye. Nicely struck and choice for the grade. PCGS# 241. 1035 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 25-M, W-1580. 7 Harp Strings. Period After GEORGIVS. MS-63 BN (PCGS). Golden-tan with lively wisps of mint orange throughout th

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    The March 2013 Baltimore Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: Superb Gem Mint State 1773 Virginia Halfpenny Tied for Finest Certified at PCGS 158 1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 3-F, W-1455. 7 Harp Strings, No Period After GEORGIVS. MS-66 BN (PCGS). 115 grains. A glossy olive-tan specimen with exceptional eye appeal and a generous quotient of soft underlying luster. The devices are as sharp as ever seen for the type, with details in such tiny device areas as the lion's mane and the harp angel's hair all prominent, and with all other details also crisp and well-presented. Prooflike in appearance, which prompted Ted Craige to write "Very Sharp Proof" on his envelope. As noted in the Bowers Encyclopedia (Whitman, 2009): "Often found with prooflike surfaces; do not confuse with the Proof Newman 1 -A. " As for the overall surface quality, low magnificatio

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    The November 2013 Baltimore Auction, U.S. Coins

    Highlight: Virginia Halfpence 4054 1 773 Virginia Halfpenny. Newman 24-K, W-1 570. 7 Harp Strings. Period After GEORGIVS. MS-65 BN (NGC). This is a splendid Gem with dominant medium brown patina. Both sides are also well balanced in strike with nice centering and bold to sharp detail throughout the design. Free of troublesome blemishes, with faint traces of faded rose luster on the obverse that further enhance already strong eye appeal. Many were the Virginia pieces sent to America for use as pocket change. Of the 13 original colonies, only Virginia had a right to coinage as outlined in the 1609 Charter for the colony It wasn’t until 1773, however, that the colony used its right and had copper coinage struck at the Tower Mint in London. Many of the Uncirculated specimens known today originated in a

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    The Americana Sale: United States Coins, Medals and Paper Money

    Highlight: 20( 6415 1773 Virginia halfpennyd-63. 111.4 grains. 26.9 mm. Rich lustrous chocolate brown with abundant mint color framing design elements. A lovely example, free of seri- ous spotting or marks. A trace of a fingerprint is pointed out on the right side of the reverse. A bit weak at central reverse, as often seen, but in every way a gorgeous type coin. From the George Polis Collection. #000241 6416 1773 Virginia halfpenny. Newman 25-M. With Period, 7 Harp Strings. Choice Brilliant Uncirculated-63. 120.1 grains. 24.9 mm. Lovely Light brown with abundant bright mint color still surrounding devices and legends. A very choice piece, free of spotting and exhibiting a very bold strike. A single dig off George's forehead is

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    American Journal of Numismatics, Vols. 1-5

    1/5/1866

    Highlight: Virginia Halfpenny, . North American Eagle, 1831 ; Quarter do. 1834, fine, New England Shilling and Sixpence, with N E and value stamped at the edge of the Coins ; the last is of extreme rarity , ..... Massachusetts Shilling, Sixpence, Threepence, and Twopence, ...... Lord Baltimore’s Shilling, Sixpence and Groat, well preserved, the Shilling and Groat very rare , Lord Baltimore’s Sixpence, rare, Virginia Halfpenny, proof; 1773, by Pingo, and five various, . . George III., Virginia Halfpenny; a Pattern, by Droz, 1 788 ; and nineteen other pieces, various, . Shilling, stamped on the edge with NE, and XII. said to be the first coin minted in New

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 135

    1/12/2007

    Highlight: led by that superb article on Virginia halfpennies [“Virginia Halfpennyup from them in order to address the question posed at the outset- Why were any of the forgeries made? Also, do they think that the various forgeries are from the same source or multiple sources? Do they suspect that the forger is a club [ANS] member? Best, John Adams July 17, 2007 Dear Mr. Adams: Thank you for having read and enjoyed our paper titled "Virginia Halfpenny Counterfeits, Forgeries, and Facsimiles." You raise some intriguing questions in your letter to the editor. Since the Virginia halfpence are fairly abundant and available in high condition, an excellent question is why anyone would attempt to produce thes

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 135

    1/12/2007

    Highlight: The paper appearing in the August 2007 issue of The Colonial Newsletter t\t\ed “Virginia Halfpenny Counterfeits, Forgeries and Facsimiles”^ provided an in-depth look at various reproductions of the Virginia coinage which have been produced over the decades. All known reproductions from major collections were evaluated, but the authors realized and stated in their manuscript that other Virginia fakes most likely existed within the holdings of other collectors. Once the paper was published, it stimulated a number of collectors to examine their Virginia coppers and additional information was forthcoming. In particular, a long time member of the American Numismatist Society, Jim Biancarosa, re-examined his extensive accumulation of colonial reproductions with particular emphasis on his nine

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 150

    1/12/2012

    Highlight: a skull was found at an old burial ground with a 1773 colonial Virginia halfpennywish custom to place coins over the eyes of the dead to prevent them from opening before burial. A number of Virginia halfpence are known counterstamped with the initials R.P.S. The counter- stamp was applied sometime before the 1 920s, when Frederick Canfield (1849-1 926) acquired one for his collection. 5 His ownership of an R.P.S counterstamped Virginia halfpenny is a clear indication they are not modern fabrications. As will be discussed later, the R.P.S counterstamp has not been found on any other colonial copper and the counterstamping may well have oc- curred in the late-1700s. One purpose of this paper is to provide a survey of the few known

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: Virginia halfpennye clever and deceptive. 20 Discussion of these fakes will be divided into those which are quite deceptive, called forgeries, and those which are easily recognized, called facsimiles. AUTHENTIC VIRGINIA HALFPENCE A better understanding and recognition of fraudulent copies and facsimiles of the Virginia coins is obtained with a more in-depth knowledge of what constitutes authentic Virginia halfpenny coinage. Though modern forgery techniques can produce very deceptive replicas of actual coins, 17 the greater one’s appreciation of the subtle attributes of the true coinage, the better prepared one is to recognize fakes. SPECIFIC GRAVITY: We know that the

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: WILLIAMSBURG REPRODUCTIONS: In 1 983 the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation decided to market struck copies of the Virginia halfpenny. Flans Birle from the Cornell and Birle Company was hired to make a master hub from which dies could be produced. Jim Nye from the Adriel Brothers Company was hired to produce the ad- ditional minting support materials, such as the stamping head, collars, cutoffs, etc. These were all sent to The Colonial Williamsburg Founda- tion where the actual minting occurred under the direction of Mark Frankel. 3940 The first hub was made with the let- ters “CWF” in relief placed under the shoul- der of George III. Fewer than five thousand cop- ies were struck with this design (see Figure 13). Soon after production began, an awareness of the Hobby Protection Act lead to a

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    American Journal of Numismatics, Vols. 1-5

    1/5/1866

    Highlight: Virginia Halfpenny, . North American Eagle, 1831 ; Quarter do. 1834, fine, New England Shilling and Sixpence, with N E and value stamped at the edge of the Coins ; the last is of extreme rarity , ..... Massachusetts Shilling, Sixpence, Threepence, and Twopence, ...... Lord Baltimore’s Shilling, Sixpence and Groat, well preserved, the Shilling and Groat very rare , Lord Baltimore’s Sixpence, rare, Virginia Halfpenny, proof; 1773, by Pingo, and five various, . . George III., Virginia Halfpenny; a Pattern, by Droz, 1 788 ; and nineteen other pieces, various, . Shilling, stamped on the edge with NE, and XII. said to be the first coin minted in New

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 129

    1/12/2005

    Highlight: December2005 THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER Sequential page 2929 New Virginia Halfpenny Variety Discovered: Newman 15-W from Roger A. Moore, M.D.; Moorestown, NJ and Alan Anthony; Leesburg, VA (TN-195) Newman 15-W: Anewly discovered Viriginiahalfpenny die variety which combines two previously known dies. [Shown 2X actual size.] Photo- graph courtesy of the authors. Introduction Since the original descriptions of the Virginia halfpence colonial coinage varieties by Eric Newman in 1956/ including his update in 1962/ few new additions have been made to the total known Virginia die varieties. With the 40 obverse and 30 reverse dies documented as having been produced at the Royal Mint to make this coinage/ some 1200 die combinations are theoretically possible. However, a recent review of all known die

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 134

    1/8/2007

    Highlight: Virginia halfpennye clever and deceptive. 20 Discussion of these fakes will be divided into those which are quite deceptive, called forgeries, and those which are easily recognized, called facsimiles. AUTHENTIC VIRGINIA HALFPENCE A better understanding and recognition of fraudulent copies and facsimiles of the Virginia coins is obtained with a more in-depth knowledge of what constitutes authentic Virginia halfpenny coinage. Though modern forgery techniques can produce very deceptive replicas of actual coins, 17 the greater one’s appreciation of the subtle attributes of the true coinage, the better prepared one is to recognize fakes. SPECIFIC GRAVITY: We know that the

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