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    acquired abroad

    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1938)

    1/1/1938

    Highlight: and malt liquors aggregating not more than one wine gallon and including not more than one hundred cigars) acquired abroad by such residents of the United States as an incident of the foreign journey for personal or household use or as souvenirs or curios, but not bought on com- mission or intended for sale, shall be free of duty: Provided further, That (a) in the case of articles acquired in any country other than a contiguous country which maintains a free zone or free port, the exemption authorized by the pre- ceding proviso shall apply only to articles so acquired by a returning resident who has remained beyond the territorial limits of the United States for a period of not less than forty-eight hours and (b) in the case of articles acquired in a contiguous country which maintains a

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1938)

    1/1/1938

    Highlight: and malt liquors aggregating not more than one wine gallon and including not more than one hundred cigars) acquired abroad by such residents of the United States as an incident of the foreign journey for personal or household use or as souvenirs or curios, but not bought on com- mission or intended for sale, shall be free of duty: Provided further, That (a) in the case of articles acquired in any country other than a contiguous country which maintains a free zone or free port, the exemption authorized by the pre- ceding proviso shall apply only to articles so acquired by a returning resident who has remained beyond the territorial limits of the United States for a period of not less than forty-eight hours and (b) in the case of articles acquired in a contiguous country which maintains a

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1957)

    1/1/1957

    Highlight: The new form provides simple “yes” and “no” type questions which indicate for the passenger whether he must list articles acquired abroad. In many instances, the listing of these articles is no longer required. In the old type of declaration, all items acquired abroad had to be itemized, whether subject to duty or not. A similar form for passengers arriving from Mexico, where the United States resident exemption requirements are slightly different, has also been adopted. The Customs Air Facilitation Committee/ (see page 69 of the 1956 Annual Report) in its study of passenger and baggage clearance at New York International Airport developed a radically new concept of inspection and examination. Applying the methods followed in modern supermarkets for “checking out” customers, the committee

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1907)

    1/1/1907

    Highlight: i the matter of articles acquired abroad now permitted citizens of thi.- country returning from foreign travel is recommended for the serious consideration of the Congress. The present exemption of $100 seems to me to be an amount too low to meet the case of the average traveler and causes much and unnecessary annoyance and complaint. In my Digitized for FRASER http://fraser.stiouisfed.org/ Federai Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1911)

    1/1/1911

    Highlight: acquired abroad by such residents of the United States, shall be admitted free of duty upon their return.” Small as this matter may seem, it concerns many thousands of instances each year, and, though the revenue interests of the Gov- ernment involved are wholly unimportant, the administrative con- siderations are of considerable moment. It would be a great relief to the Treasury Department and to many thousands of travelers to have this bothersome language changed. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. While the Public Health .Service has been doing remarkably im- portant, efficient and enlightened work, its development and expan- sion have been, of late, more or less restrained because attention has been called from the service itself to an effort to erect a health department with a new member of the

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1965)

    1/1/1965

    Highlight: — The volume of requests for the importation of gold coin and the cases involving coins acquired abroad without a li- cense by uninformed tourists, continued at a high rate. Their settle- ment has been expedited to a large extent by the use of form letters and circulars which set forth the condition's governmg the importation of gold coins. End uses of gold. — End-Use Certificates with detailed information concerning the end use of gold were in effect throughout the calendar year 1964. The estimated allocation by use for 1964 is shown in the table below. Estimated allocation of gold hy use for the year 1964 End use Fine ounces Dollars, based on $35 per ounce Percent 2, 664, 274 550, 171 2S2, 020 23, 957 432, 908 249, 657 $93, 249, 590 19, 255, 985 9, 870,700 838, 495 15, 151,780 8, 737, 99

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1967)

    1/1/1967

    Highlight: — The volume of requests for the importation of gold coins and the cases involving coins acquired abroad without license by uninformed tourists, continued to be large. End uses of gold. — End-use certificates with detailed inform.ation concerning the end-use of gold were in effect through the calendar year 1966. The estimated allocation by use for 1966 is shown in the table below. Estimated allocation of gold by use for the calendar year 1966 Fine troy ounces. Dollars, based on $35 per ounce Percent Jewelry and arts 3, 758, 502 131, 547, 570 62 Dental—- 424, 347 14, 852, 145 7 Industrial, electrical, and electronics, including space and defense 1, 636, 767 57,286,845 27 Other industrial, including space and defense-. 242, 484 8,486,940 4 Total 6, 062, 100 212, 173, 500 100 Silver Commencin

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 99]

    /1919

    Highlight: The latter are authorized under the terms of the bill to issue their own obligations or debentures against securities acquired abroad which they may offer to the invest- ing public. These corporations will be under the general supervision of the Federal Re- serve Board, and as their funds will be drawn directly from the investment market, their operations will not impair the liquidity of the assets of the Federal Reserve Banks. Hon. Myron T. Herrick, former United States Ambassador to France, made a brilliant address. He pointed out that the courage and endurance ex- hibited by the Allied Nations in the war indicated that character which formed the surest basis of credit. ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM C. REDFIELD, SECRETARY OF COMMERCE As I see it, the obligations of the world to the United

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1907)

    1/1/1907

    Highlight: i the matter of articles acquired abroad now permitted citizens of thi.- country returning from foreign travel is recommended for the serious consideration of the Congress. The present exemption of $100 seems to me to be an amount too low to meet the case of the average traveler and causes much and unnecessary annoyance and complaint. In my Digitized for FRASER http://fraser.stiouisfed.org/ Federai Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1911)

    1/1/1911

    Highlight: acquired abroad by such residents of the United States, shall be admitted free of duty upon their return.” Small as this matter may seem, it concerns many thousands of instances each year, and, though the revenue interests of the Gov- ernment involved are wholly unimportant, the administrative con- siderations are of considerable moment. It would be a great relief to the Treasury Department and to many thousands of travelers to have this bothersome language changed. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. While the Public Health .Service has been doing remarkably im- portant, efficient and enlightened work, its development and expan- sion have been, of late, more or less restrained because attention has been called from the service itself to an effort to erect a health department with a new member of the

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1964)

    1/1/1964

    Highlight: — The volume of applications for the importa- tion of gold coin and the number of cases involving coins acquired abroad without a license and attempts to import such coins continued at a high rate. Keport forms have been prepared for the use of Customs authorities in order to expedite the settlement of such cases and to reduce the amount of paperwork involved; and the Bureau of Customs has inserted information concerning gold controls into their circulars. End uses of gold . — The compilation of statistics concerning the end uses of gold was continued. During the first half of the calendar year 1963, the end-use certificates provided data for only a few broad categories. However, during a part of the second half of 1963 a new form which called for more detailed information went into effect

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1965)

    1/1/1965

    Highlight: — The volume of requests for the importation of gold coin and the cases involving coins acquired abroad without a li- cense by uninformed tourists, continued at a high rate. Their settle- ment has been expedited to a large extent by the use of form letters and circulars which set forth the condition's governmg the importation of gold coins. End uses of gold. — End-Use Certificates with detailed information concerning the end use of gold were in effect throughout the calendar year 1964. The estimated allocation by use for 1964 is shown in the table below. Estimated allocation of gold hy use for the year 1964 End use Fine ounces Dollars, based on $35 per ounce Percent 2, 664, 274 550, 171 2S2, 020 23, 957 432, 908 249, 657 $93, 249, 590 19, 255, 985 9, 870,700 838, 495 15, 151,780 8, 737, 99

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1966)

    1/1/1966

    Highlight: — The volume of requests for the importation of gold coins and the cases involving coins acquired abroad without license by uninformed tourists, has continued to be large. End uses of gold, — End-use certificates with detailed information concerning the end use of gold were in effect throughout the calendar i See exliibit 77. Digitized for FRASER Bld^Mealsfejr^BAiSfeR.org/ Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1967)

    1/1/1967

    Highlight: — The volume of requests for the importation of gold coins and the cases involving coins acquired abroad without license by uninformed tourists, continued to be large. End uses of gold. — End-use certificates with detailed inform.ation concerning the end-use of gold were in effect through the calendar year 1966. The estimated allocation by use for 1966 is shown in the table below. Estimated allocation of gold by use for the calendar year 1966 Fine troy ounces. Dollars, based on $35 per ounce Percent Jewelry and arts 3, 758, 502 131, 547, 570 62 Dental—- 424, 347 14, 852, 145 7 Industrial, electrical, and electronics, including space and defense 1, 636, 767 57,286,845 27 Other industrial, including space and defense-. 242, 484 8,486,940 4 Total 6, 062, 100 212, 173, 500 100 Silver Commencin

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1968)

    1/1/1968

    Highlight: — The estimated value of articles -acquired abroad and brought into the United -States during 1967 -by U.S. residents re- turning from -countries -other than Mexico, and Canada and the Carribhean area totaled -approx-imately $200 million. One hundred ten million dollars of this amount was brought in under 'the present $100 Customs duty-free exemption granted to returning residents. A substantial reduction in this duty-free exem-p- tion would achieve a significant reduction in the value of articles brought into the United States by returning U.S. -residents. b. $10 gift exemption for parcels arriving l>y mail. — An estimated 11 million packages arriving by mail -during 1967 were admitted duty-free under the exist- ing exemption for gifts valued at less -than $10. In addition, many other

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1951)

    1/1/1951

    Highlight: A procedure designed to improve the customs clearance of unac- companied articles acquired abroad by returning residents of the United States, installed on a test basis, has proved successful in reducing substantially the time required for clearance of these articles after they arrive in this country. Studies and tests of further im- provements in this procedure will be made in 1952. Other management improvements, — Other management efforts to simplify operations, conserve manpower, and improve service to. the public, include the following: The program to establish central fiscal and personnel offices, in order to consolidate administrative services wherever possible and reduce the cost of performing these services, was practically completed in 1951. 968873—52 7 Digitized for FRASER

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 72]

    /1906

    Highlight: the selling bank will provide cover for its drawings on New York by selling sterling or other foreign exchange in that market against the credit balances acquired abroad by means of the bills of exchange drawn against the shipments of the very grain for the purchase of which in the first place its notes were issued. If gold is imported the resulting transactions are very similar, as New York is the point from which it is usually obtained. In this connection it is interesting to note that some of the Canadian banks are among the largest dealers in foreign exchange in New York, where the credit of their bills is unexcelled. So extensive are these foreign transactions that several of the Canadian banks maintain their own offices in New York, and even in London, for the purpose of looking afte

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 99]

    /1919

    Highlight: The latter are authorized under the terms of the bill to issue their own obligations or debentures against securities acquired abroad which they may offer to the invest- ing public. These corporations will be under the general supervision of the Federal Re- serve Board, and as their funds will be drawn directly from the investment market, their operations will not impair the liquidity of the assets of the Federal Reserve Banks. Hon. Myron T. Herrick, former United States Ambassador to France, made a brilliant address. He pointed out that the courage and endurance ex- hibited by the Allied Nations in the war indicated that character which formed the surest basis of credit. ADDRESS OF HON. WILLIAM C. REDFIELD, SECRETARY OF COMMERCE As I see it, the obligations of the world to the United

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    Harper's New Monthly Magazine

    /1895

    Highlight: and no less word will serve for that which he acquired abroad. He taught himself. He had no model. His speaking was like that of no other. Who else was there who could be amus- ing and instructive in the same breath, who could talk in parables, make the keenest wit do the work of sense and rea- son, and when he was called upon for a homily, make a story serve instead? With- al, he had a charm of manner which won its way to the heart. His elocution, about which he professed himself anxious, must have been carefully studied. His voice was deep and full, with vibrating tones. He understood — and there are few who understand, except in France, where elo- cution is seriously taught — how to take and sustain a note and not let it go. And there was no audience to which he was not sympathetic,

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