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    NEW BOOK: COINS OF THE BENGAL PRESIDENCY

    10/21/2012

    Highlight: NEW BOOK: COINS OF THE BENGAL PRESIDENCY http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v15n44a03.html

    Caroline Newton of Baldwin's forwarded this press release about a new book on the coins of the Bengal Presidency. -Editor

    Caroline adds:

    It is the first of three volumes written by Dr. Paul Stevens that document the coins of the East India Company. The first volume explores the coins and mints of the Bengal Presidency from 1757, when the EIC first acquired the right to mint coins there, until 1835, when a uniform coinage was introduced into British India. The three volumes will, without doubt, become the new industry reference works.

    NEW BOOK: COINS OF THE BENGAL PRESIDENCY

    10/21/2012

    Highlight: BOOK: COINS OF THE BENGAL PRESIDENCY http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v15n44a03.html Caroline Newton of Baldwin's forwarded this press release about a new book on the coins of the Bengal Presidency. -Editor Caroline adds: It is the first of three volumes written by Dr. Paul Stevens that document the coins of the East India Company. The first volume explores the coins and mints of the Bengal Presidencyage was introduced into British India. The three volumes will, without doubt, become the new industry reference works. THE COINAGE OF THE HON. EAST INDIA COMPANY _ PART 1 THE COINS OF THE BENGAL PRESIDENCY Dr. Paul Stevens first book, ?The Coins of the Bengal Presidency' is an essential

    Caroline Newton of Baldwin's forwarded this press release about a new book on the coins of the Beng

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    The Saint Ludovico and Firth of Clyde Collections

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. Mohur, AH 1202 year 19 (frozen year, struck in the early 1800's). Mint name Murshidabad. In the name of Shah ^Alam IE Km 103. MS-64 (PCGS). (1,000-1,200) 2601 INDIA. East India Company. Bengal Presidency, sunburst and flower in the fields. 10.8 grams. Date unrecorded in KM and Pridmore, KM 31 (for type). Choice About Uncirculated-Uncirculated. An attractive example. (800-1,000) 2602 INDIA. East India Company. ☆ Bombay Presidency. Proof Vi Pice, 1794. KM 192. Proof-64 BN (NGC) ☆ Bengal Presidency. Half Rupee, Year 19. KM 97.1. MS-63 (NGC). (Total: 2 pieces) (275-325) 2603 INDIA. East India Company. Madras Presidency. 2

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    The November 2011 Baltimore Auction

    Highlight: NGC Fine Details — Removed From Jewelry.$700-$900 22290 Bengal Presidency. Mohur, AH 1202 Year 19 (1787-88). Fr-1537: KM-113. NGC MS-62 $1400-$1800 22291 Bengal Presidency. Mohur, AH 1202 Year 19 (1788). Fr-1537; KM-113. NGC AU-55 $700-$1000 22292 Bengal Presidency. 1/2 Mohur Jewelers Copy, AH 1202 Year 19 (1788). cf.Fr-1 541 ; cf.KM-1 1 1 . Edge bump. VERY FINE $250-$350 22293 East India Company. Mohur, 1841. Fr-1595a: KM-462.1. Mount removed at 12 o'clock. VERY FINE $700-$900 22294 Madras Presidency. 2 Pagodas, ND (ca. 1808-15). Fr- 1582; KM-358. 18 Stars in field. NGC AU-55. $700-$900 22295 Madras Presidency. Mohur, AH 1172 Year 6 (1758-59). Fr-1584; KM-418. Frozen date. NGC EF-40 $1000-$1500 22296 Madras Presidency. Mohur, ND (1819). Fr-1587; KM-421.1. Issued by the English East India

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    The January 2012 N.Y.I.N.C. Auction

    Highlight: VERY FINE $500-$650 750 Bengal Presidency. Mohur, AH 1204, Year 32 (1790). Shah Alam II (1759-1806). Fr-1534: KM-31. Sharp strike, clear date and year, light hairlines, lustrous. NGC UNC DETAILS, Surface Hairlines $1300-$1600 751 East India Company. Jeweler's Imitation Mo- hur, AH(1212)//19. cf. Fr-1537; Bruce-11. EXTREMELY FINE $500-$700 752 Mohur, AH 1202 Year 19 (1788). Bengal Presidency. Fr- 1 537; KM-1 13. Frozen date. 1 793 Issue, oblique edge reed- ing. NGC MS-62 $110-51400 753 Bengal Presidency East India Company. 1/2 Mohur, AH1202//19. Fr-1538: KM-1 01. Oblique edge reeding. Jeweler's copy. VERY FINE $150-$250 754 Madras Presidency. 5 Rupees (1/3 Mohur), ND (ca.1820). Fr-1590; KM-422. Traces of adjustment marks. ALMOST UNCIRCULATED $500-5700 755 East India Company. Mohur, 1841.

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2003

    Highlight: The only coins that Doty records as being produced at the Soho mint for the Bengal Presidencyce in 1809. but various problems caused this project to be abandoned and only the patterns remain. However, Vice has added to this with his research into the hexagonal patterns produced at Soho, 34 and has shown that Pridmore ’s view that these coins were to be used in the Bombay Presidency was wrong, and that they were planned for use in the Bengal Presidency to replace cowrie shells. A paper has been presented to the Society on a pattern two annas of 1841, 35 confirming Pridmore ’s prediction that coins of this denomination should exist with plain edges, although at the time that he wrote no specimens were known and he had only archival sources for his prediction.

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2003

    Highlight: The only coins that Doty records as being produced at the Soho mint for the Bengal Presidencyce in 1809. but various problems caused this project to be abandoned and only the patterns remain. However, Vice has added to this with his research into the hexagonal patterns produced at Soho, 34 and has shown that Pridmore ’s view that these coins were to be used in the Bombay Presidency was wrong, and that they were planned for use in the Bengal Presidency to replace cowrie shells. A paper has been presented to the Society on a pattern two annas of 1841, 35 confirming Pridmore ’s prediction that coins of this denomination should exist with plain edges, although at the time that he wrote no specimens were known and he had only archival sources for his prediction.

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2003

    Highlight: The only coins that Doty records as being produced at the Soho mint for the Bengal Presidencyce in 1809. but various problems caused this project to be abandoned and only the patterns remain. However, Vice has added to this with his research into the hexagonal patterns produced at Soho, 34 and has shown that Pridmore ’s view that these coins were to be used in the Bombay Presidency was wrong, and that they were planned for use in the Bengal Presidency to replace cowrie shells. A paper has been presented to the Society on a pattern two annas of 1841, 35 confirming Pridmore ’s prediction that coins of this denomination should exist with plain edges, although at the time that he wrote no specimens were known and he had only archival sources for his prediction.

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    The August 2016 ANA Auction, Ancient & World Coins

    Highlight: NGC MS-63 $2500-$3500 21037 Bengal Presidency. Mohur, AH 1202//19 (1788). Fr-1537; KM- 113. Oblique edge milling. Issued for the East India Company. An easy coin to become enamored with, bright fresh lustrous surfaces and sharp legends. A very appeal- ing example of the type that has never seen circulation. NGC MS-62 $1000-$1200 21038 Bengal Presidency. Mohur, AH 1202//19 (1787/8). Calcutta. Fr-1537; KM-112. Obverse inscription, “Shah Alam II Badshah”. Vertical edge milling. Conservatively graded and housed within an older NGC holder. Eigh- teenth century gold coinage in this state of preservation is an extraordinary find. Machine struck and a coin that must have been instantly set aside in order to remain this pristine. Satin luster with a tinge of green coloration. NGC MS-63 $1000-$1500

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    The January 2016 Internet-Only NYINC Auction

    Highlight: NGC MS-64+ $60-$80 42515 Bengal Presidency. Jeweler’s Copy 1/2 Mohur, ND Year 13 (ca. 18th Century). 23.39 mm; 6.28 gms. cfFr-1541; cfKM-101. An interesting little item with calligraphy of a simplified hand done in the style of the Mohurs of the Bengal Presidency with its tell tale snow- flake like mark. Oblique edge milling. Medium orange toning attests to advanced age with a few spots of even darker hues. Enigmatic and clearly of local manufacture. ALMOST UNCIRCULATED $250-$350 From the Dr. Michael Philip Collection. Ex: Stacks Sale December 7, 8 1989 Lot# 2495. 42516 Bombay Presidency. East India Company. Pice, 1791. KM- 193. Dark cocoa surfaces with a nice glossy luster. NGC PROOF-64 BN $150-$200 42517 Bombay Presidency. East India Company. Pice, 1794. KM- 193; Pr-133. Mahogany toning

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    The January 2016 NYINC Auction

    Highlight: GOOD-UNCIRCULATED $1500-$2500 41117 Bengal Presidencysty undisturbed surfaces across the balance of the coin. A coin typically encountered with significant evidence of circulation. The piece offered here is superior to most seen, the UNCIRCULATED portion of the label being the far more important grading criteria. Rim bump at 3 o’clock ob- verse, PCGS Genuine— Rim Damage, Unc Details Secure Holder. $900-$1200 41118 Bengal Presidency. Mohur. AH 1184, Year 11 (ca. 1770). Shah Alam II (1759-1806). Fr-1528; KM-94.1. Evidence of smoothing along the edges, otherwise quite nice for the grade. Boldly struck with loads of luster. PCGS Genuine— Ex- Jewelry

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    The Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. Collection

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency, in the name of Shah Alam. Legends both sides. Cleaned, slightly bent at rim. Contemporary cast copy made for circulation, somewhat granular. ($125-225) Purchased from G. Lichteufels, October 22, 1954. nil 1202 AH (i.e.l819) mohur. Fr-1540, KM-112, Pridmore-62. MS-63 (NGC). 13.28 grams, 27.90 mm. Bengal Presidency. Types as above. Lustrous deep yellow gold. ($300-450) Purchased from Ira S. Reed, April 15, 1944. India — British E.I. Co. Madras 2274 (1808-15) 2 pagodas. Fr-1582, KM-351.8, Pridmore-146. MS-63 (NGC). 5.91 grams, 20.30 mm. Pagoda amid stars / Vishnu standing, legends around on both sides. Lustrous deep yellow gold. Variety with 18 obverse stars. ($450-750) From the John H. Clapp Collection; Clapp estate to Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr., 1942. 2275 (1819) mohur.

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint to the Secretary of the Treasury for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1898

    30/6/1898

    Highlight: — The copper coinage was introduced into the Bengal presidency by Act XVII of 1835, and into the Madras and Bombay presidencies (with retrospective effect in the latter) by Act XXII of 1844. The weight of the copper coins now struck under Act XXIII of 1870 remains the same as it was in 1835. It is as follows: Grains troy. Double pice, or half anna 200 Pice, or quarter anna 100 Half pice, or one-eighth of an anna 50 Pie, being one-third of a pice, or one-twelfth of an anna 33§ Ninety rupees’ worth of pice weigh 576,000 grains troy, or 82f pounds avoirdupois. The two native States of Alwar and Bikanir, which are supplied with silver coin under the native coinage act, are also supplied with copper coins struck at the Indian mints. Two other States, Dhar and Dewas, have also ceased to mint

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1900

    30/6/1900

    Highlight: The copper coinage was introduced into the Bengal presidency by Act XVII of 1835, and into the Madras and Bombay presidencies by Act XXII of 1844. The weight of the copper coins now struck under Act XXIII of 1870 remains the same as it was in 1835. It is as follows: Grains troy. Double pice, or half anna 200 Pice, or quarter anna 100 Half pice, or one-eighth anna 50 Pie, being one-third of a pice or one-twelfth of an anna 33$ Ninety rupees’ worth of pice weigh 576,000 grains troy, or 82f- pounds avoirdupois. The two native states of Alvar and Bikaner, which were supplied with silver coins under the native coinage act, are also supplied with copper coins struck at the Indian mints. Two other states, Dhar and Dewas, which have also ceased to mint copper, are supplied with copper coins struck

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals : in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa. [1914]

    /1914

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. AV. Mohur. Nineteenth year of Emperor Shah Aulum, or after 1773. Edge, obliquely milled. Weight, 189 grains. 5. AV. Half-mohur. Similar to No. 4. 6. AV. Quarter-mohur. Similar to No. 4. 7. AE. Sicca-rupee. Year 19. Oblique milling; mint-mark, star. 8. AR. Sicca-rupee. Similar to No. 7, but with upright milling on edge. 9. AE. Half-rupee. As No. 8. 10. Quarter-rupee. As No. 8. 11. 2 Annas. Dated 1204. Year 20. 12. Sicca-rupee (1832-1835). Same as No. 4. Edge, plain. 13. Half-rupee. As No. 12. 14. Quarter-rupee. As No. 12. 15. AE. Half-anna, 1845. Obv. Arms of the East India Company. Rev. Value within laurel wreath. 16. AE. 1 Pie. Obv. Value in English and Bengalee. Rev. Value in Per- sian and Nagree. 17. Madras Presidency. AV. Star pagoda. Obv. The god Swami. Rev.

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals : in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa. [1914]

    /1914

    Highlight: 264 Bengal presidency , corns of 665 Bermuda, corns of 317,632 Berne, corns of 503, 504 Bertholf, Lieut. E. P.,medalof 665 Biddle, Capt. James, medal of 339 Bithynia, Kingdom, coins of 403 Bitts,2, 4, 6 7 Blakeley, Capt. Johnston, medal of 338 Bliss, Lieut. Col., medal of 370 Blue, Victor, medal of. 379 Bohemia, corns of 498,651 Bolivia, corns of. 261, 629 Bombay, Presidency 665 Borneo, British North, coins of 668 Bosbyshell, Oliver C., medal of 350 Brabant, coins of 457 Bracteates 469 Brandenburg: Beyrouth, coins of 473 Ansbach, coins of 473 Brasher, Doubloon 29 Brazil: Portuguese Colony, coins of 294,631 Necessity coinage of 299 The Empire, coins of 301 Republic, corns of 307,631 Medal of, to Prest. Monroe 670

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    Coin Collector's Journal, vol. 9

    1/1/1884

    Highlight: it was finally enacted that the copper coins of the Bengal presidency should be limited to the single and double pice or half- anna, and the pie. For several years there were mints at Barnares, Furrukabad, and Sangor, which also coined copper pice. The arrangement of the copper coins of Bengal are as follows: GEORGE III. (1760-1820). •N"o. 1.- Obv. English east india company, incused upon a broad raised edge. In the field, Sicca (having authority) Company in the year of Christ, in two lines of Hindustanee, following which is the date 1793, in Arabic figures. Rev. same as obverse. Pai. Pare. Trial piece. lS r o. 2. — Obv. The Bale Mark, 1794. Rev. Inscription in Hin- dustanee, as on No. 1. Trial piece. No. 3. — Obv. Arms of the East India Company, with the hel- met ; on the ribbon ausp:

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa [1912]

    /1912

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. AV. Hohur. Nineteenth year of Emperor Shah Aulum, or after 1773. Edge, obliquely milled. Weight, 189 grains. 6. AV. Half-mohur. Similar to No. 4. 6. AV. Quarter-moliur. Similar to No. 4. 7. AE. Sicca-nipee. Year 19. Oblique milling; mint-mark, star. 8. AS. Sicca-rupee. Similar to No. 7, but with upright milling on edge. 9. AB. Half-rupee. As No. 8. 10. Quarter-rupee. As No. 8. 11. 2 Annas. Dated 1204. Year 20. 12. Sicca-rupee (1832-1835). Same as No. 4. Edge, plain. 13. Half-rupee. As No. 12. 14. Quarter-rupee. As No. 12. 16. AE. Half-anna, 1845. Obv. Arms of the East India Company. Rev. Value within laurel wreath. 16. AE. 1 Pie. Obv. Value in English and Bengalee. Rev. Value in Per- sian and Nagree. 17. Madras Presidency. AV. Star pagoda. Obv. The god Swami. Rev.

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    Numisma, no. 3 [1961]

    1/10/1961

    Highlight: were products of the Bengal Presidency mint of Calcutta. (c) Prince of Wales Island coins struck in 1188 The particular Penang coin to which this mule reverse is linked was the first copper coinage for the island. All the present available evidence points to the fact that the coins were struck at the Calcutta mint prior to the sailing of the founding expedition which took possession of the island on 11 August 1786. I am not conversant with the English 18th century tokens, but in the solving of this problem, attention should be paid to the note by R. H. Williamson (Seaby’s Coin arid Medal Bulletin , 1957, p. 54) who points out that Lutwyche was the coiner of a series of

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 10]

    /1856

    Highlight: within the Bengal presidency. These were followed up by similar attempts at various other points wdthin the three presidencies ; the American plant- ers were shifted from one locality to another, with a view of testing the comparative qualities of soil ; in some instances model plantations were Digitized Original from UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 26]

    /1872

    Highlight: Those dated 1818 of the Bengal Presidency were worth 88.08; of the Madras Presi- dency, 87.10; of the Bombay Presidency, 87.09. Those dated 1835, during the reign of William IV., the value is 87.10. — Eckfeldt's Manual . Moeda D'Ouro, of Brazil, a gold coin of Petrus I. ; date, 1824 ; value, <£ 1 0s. Id. sterling. Moidore. A Portugese gold coin, first struck in 1688 ; in the year 1689, under the reign of Peter II., its value was 86.45 ; under the same reign those struck in 1705 the value was 86.59 ; during the reign of John V. those dating from 1714 to 1726 were valued 86 48. This coin continued to be struck until the yes r 1732. Digitized by L^ooQle

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    NI Bulletin

    1/3/2008

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. 1651- 1835. AR Rupee (1 1.60 g, 9h). Calcutta mint. Dated AH [1171]; RY 4 of Alamgir II (1757/8 AD). Persian legend with regnal year and mint / Persian legend with poetical couplet; AH date (off flan), mintmarks star and rosette. Cf. Pridmore 7 (regnal year 4 not listed, but see pp. 197-8); KM 8.2. The British East India Company opened a mint in Calcutta on 13th June 1757, having expelled the Nawab of Bengal from the city earlier in the year. From that date until 28th July, extremely rare mohurs and rupees were struck with the mint name Alinagar Kalkatah (Calcutta, the Port of God). At that point the mint name was changed to simply Kalkatah. The rare regnal year 4 rupees, not known but posited by Pridmore, were struck through 28th April 1758. During this period, on the 2

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 9, No.6

    1/6/1975

    Highlight: mint Basoda, city, mint, scarce, Gwalior State Bassein, city, mint, near Bombay, Portuguese Colony IMC Valentine/ Brown Valentine/ Gupta BCC/JNSI i960 JNSI 1939 Gupta IMC -4 Bednur (Nagar), city, mint, Mysore Bela (Beylah), city, mint, scarce, Baluchistan BCC/Valentine Bellary, city, mint, scarce, Mysore State Gupta Benares (Vamasi), city, mint (Hindu Holy City)Craig also (Muhammadabad) Bengal, Presidency, state Craig/ BCC 158

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 10, No.11

    1/11/1976

    Highlight: INDIA - BRITISH: Bengal Presidency - Trisul Pice Val. #21.67 and Similar to V67. Bombay Presidency - C212a - 1249/ 1833 . East India Co. - C3OO.3 - 1835B, 1858H; C301 - 1835c No Dot w/F; C303 - 1835 .B No Initial; Yla - l84lC (2 var.); Y2 - l84CM; Y2a - 1840C; Y3 - 1840C; Y 3 a - 1840C With WW Incuse; Y4 - 1840B No Init., 19 Berries, Lg. Diam. ; Y4a - 1840C WW Raised, 27 Berries (not in SCWC). . (To be continued) 395

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 11, No.5

    1/5/1977

    Highlight: the Bengal Presidency and miscellaneous mints of the East India Co. Since the beginning of British relations in India were with the Mughals - whose Empire Britain finally replaced and extinguished - many of the coins, particularly the later ones, are Islamic in nature. They reflect the beauty of the Persian-Mughal style and no Islamic collection would be complete without a good selection. The early coins issued were small and crude but with the advent of the 19 th century, many pieces are not only well struck, but also beauti- ful. Not only did the British adopt the Mughal standards but their im- portant supply of vast quantities of bullion and other metals for coinage had a great deal to do with the prosperity of the East India Company, but also with the gradually increasing measure of

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 16, No.10

    1/10/1982

    Highlight: When the Straits were administered as part of the Bengal Presidency (1830-1867) the official unit of currency was the Indian rupee although trade was carried on in foreign silver dollars supple- mented by copper coins issued by the East India Company. When the Straits came under the supervision of the British Colonial Office in 1867, the dollars of Mexico, Spain, Peru, Bolivia and Hong Kong were declared legal tender. In 1874 the dollars of Japan and the United States were also give the status of legal tender. 1 The variety of foreign dollars in both the Straits and Hong Kong re- sulted in confusion. Some were preferred over others. The Chambers of Commerce of Hong Kong and Singapore petitioned the British govern- ment to issue trade dollars, but the British rejected the proposal because o

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 10, No.11

    1/11/1976

    Highlight: INDIA - BRITISH: Bengal Presidency - Trisul Pice Val. #21.67 and Similar to V67. Bombay Presidency - C212a - 1249/ 1833 . East India Co. - C3OO.3 - 1835B, 1858H; C301 - 1835c No Dot w/F; C303 - 1835 .B No Initial; Yla - l84lC (2 var.); Y2 - l84CM; Y2a - 1840C; Y3 - 1840C; Y 3 a - 1840C With WW Incuse; Y4 - 1840B No Init., 19 Berries, Lg. Diam. ; Y4a - 1840C WW Raised, 27 Berries (not in SCWC). . (To be continued) 395

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    NI Bulletin

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: The larger gold Mohur of the Bengal Presidency of the East India Company in Calcutta was valued at one pound, seventeen shillings and sixpence. The Rupee of the East India Company, also widely circulated, was set at two shillings and sixpence. What went through Governor King’s mind when he evaluated the various coinage and set the values we can only speculate. However, the raising of a coin’s value was a risk he had to take if the drain on the available coinage was to be slowed. King was recalled after serving his appointed term. His period as Governor saw the expansion of New South Wales, Van Diemen’s Land and the development of sheep breeding and trade. He received the gratitude of King George III for his ‘great improvement of the Colony under his superintendence’. Philip Gidley King,

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    GOLD MOHURS STILL SHINE

    GOLD MOHURS STILL SHINE

    08/21/2005

    Highlight: which thesolicitors convert into rupees at the rate of 1 GMS = Rs15.This is the rate that has remained fixed since 1835 when theBritish imposed a common currency across the country,removing the discrepancy between mohurs struck in theirown Bengal Presidency, which were at Rs16 to the mohur,and those struck in the Bombay and Madras Presidencies,which were at Rs15.""Mohurs were struck in mints across the country and, infact, this is what their name means. ?Literally, it is Farsi for?Struck? or ?Stamped?. Can also mean ?strike? or ?stamp?as a noun,? says Mr Bhandare.""Apparently some English lawyers still quote by the guinea,though this is an eccentricity, and the figure is taken as equivalentto a pound sterling."To read the full article, see: Full Story

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 36, August 21, 2005, Article 16GOLD MOHURS STILL SHINEThe following ex

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    STACK'S DECEMBER 2009 COIN GALLERIES SALE

    11/22/2009

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. _ Rupee, Year 19 of Shah 'Alam II, frozen date. Murshidabad. Persian inscription on both sides, snowflake-like mintmark. KM 101. Modern machine struck coinage, straight reeding. Lot 1409: 1825 Erie Canal Completion Medal 1825 Erie Canal Completion Medal. White metal. About Uncirculated. 81.5mm. By Sir Edward Thomason after Charles Cushing Wright. Forest god Pan seated with sea god Neptune. Rev. New York State Arms, legend gives dates of commencement, completion. Struck by Thomason as a pirated version of the smaller C.C. Wright original that was commissioned by the New York authorities. Reverse exhibits fascinating tawny red-gold peripheries and clear blue at center. Wayne Homren, Editor | NBS (coinbooks.org) Web The Numismatic Bibliomania Society is a non-profit

    Below are a few images of other interesting lots in the upcoming Stack's Coin Galleries sale. The s

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1900

    30/6/1900

    Highlight: The copper coinage was introduced into the Bengal presidency by Act XVII of 1835, and into the Madras and Bombay presidencies by Act XXII of 1844. The weight of the copper coins now struck under Act XXIII of 1870 remains the same as it was in 1835. It is as follows: Grains troy. Double pice, or half anna 200 Pice, or quarter anna 100 Half pice, or one-eighth anna 50 Pie, being one-third of a pice or one-twelfth of an anna 33$ Ninety rupees’ worth of pice weigh 576,000 grains troy, or 82f- pounds avoirdupois. The two native states of Alvar and Bikaner, which were supplied with silver coins under the native coinage act, are also supplied with copper coins struck at the Indian mints. Two other states, Dhar and Dewas, which have also ceased to mint copper, are supplied with copper coins struck

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    Coin Collector's Journal, vol. 9

    1/1/1884

    Highlight: it was finally enacted that the copper coins of the Bengal presidency should be limited to the single and double pice or half- anna, and the pie. For several years there were mints at Barnares, Furrukabad, and Sangor, which also coined copper pice. The arrangement of the copper coins of Bengal are as follows: GEORGE III. (1760-1820). •N"o. 1.- Obv. English east india company, incused upon a broad raised edge. In the field, Sicca (having authority) Company in the year of Christ, in two lines of Hindustanee, following which is the date 1793, in Arabic figures. Rev. same as obverse. Pai. Pare. Trial piece. lS r o. 2. — Obv. The Bale Mark, 1794. Rev. Inscription in Hin- dustanee, as on No. 1. Trial piece. No. 3. — Obv. Arms of the East India Company, with the hel- met ; on the ribbon ausp:

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa [1912]

    /1912

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. AV. Hohur. Nineteenth year of Emperor Shah Aulum, or after 1773. Edge, obliquely milled. Weight, 189 grains. 6. AV. Half-mohur. Similar to No. 4. 6. AV. Quarter-moliur. Similar to No. 4. 7. AE. Sicca-nipee. Year 19. Oblique milling; mint-mark, star. 8. AS. Sicca-rupee. Similar to No. 7, but with upright milling on edge. 9. AB. Half-rupee. As No. 8. 10. Quarter-rupee. As No. 8. 11. 2 Annas. Dated 1204. Year 20. 12. Sicca-rupee (1832-1835). Same as No. 4. Edge, plain. 13. Half-rupee. As No. 12. 14. Quarter-rupee. As No. 12. 16. AE. Half-anna, 1845. Obv. Arms of the East India Company. Rev. Value within laurel wreath. 16. AE. 1 Pie. Obv. Value in English and Bengalee. Rev. Value in Per- sian and Nagree. 17. Madras Presidency. AV. Star pagoda. Obv. The god Swami. Rev.

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals : in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa. [1914]

    /1914

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. AV. Mohur. Nineteenth year of Emperor Shah Aulum, or after 1773. Edge, obliquely milled. Weight, 189 grains. 5. AV. Half-mohur. Similar to No. 4. 6. AV. Quarter-mohur. Similar to No. 4. 7. AE. Sicca-rupee. Year 19. Oblique milling; mint-mark, star. 8. AR. Sicca-rupee. Similar to No. 7, but with upright milling on edge. 9. AE. Half-rupee. As No. 8. 10. Quarter-rupee. As No. 8. 11. 2 Annas. Dated 1204. Year 20. 12. Sicca-rupee (1832-1835). Same as No. 4. Edge, plain. 13. Half-rupee. As No. 12. 14. Quarter-rupee. As No. 12. 15. AE. Half-anna, 1845. Obv. Arms of the East India Company. Rev. Value within laurel wreath. 16. AE. 1 Pie. Obv. Value in English and Bengalee. Rev. Value in Per- sian and Nagree. 17. Madras Presidency. AV. Star pagoda. Obv. The god Swami. Rev.

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals : in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa. [1914]

    /1914

    Highlight: 264 Bengal presidency , corns of 665 Bermuda, corns of 317,632 Berne, corns of 503, 504 Bertholf, Lieut. E. P.,medalof 665 Biddle, Capt. James, medal of 339 Bithynia, Kingdom, coins of 403 Bitts,2, 4, 6 7 Blakeley, Capt. Johnston, medal of 338 Bliss, Lieut. Col., medal of 370 Blue, Victor, medal of. 379 Bohemia, corns of 498,651 Bolivia, corns of. 261, 629 Bombay, Presidency 665 Borneo, British North, coins of 668 Bosbyshell, Oliver C., medal of 350 Brabant, coins of 457 Bracteates 469 Brandenburg: Beyrouth, coins of 473 Ansbach, coins of 473 Brasher, Doubloon 29 Brazil: Portuguese Colony, coins of 294,631 Necessity coinage of 299 The Empire, coins of 301 Republic, corns of 307,631 Medal of, to Prest. Monroe 670

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint to the Secretary of the Treasury for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1898

    30/6/1898

    Highlight: — The copper coinage was introduced into the Bengal presidency by Act XVII of 1835, and into the Madras and Bombay presidencies (with retrospective effect in the latter) by Act XXII of 1844. The weight of the copper coins now struck under Act XXIII of 1870 remains the same as it was in 1835. It is as follows: Grains troy. Double pice, or half anna 200 Pice, or quarter anna 100 Half pice, or one-eighth of an anna 50 Pie, being one-third of a pice, or one-twelfth of an anna 33§ Ninety rupees’ worth of pice weigh 576,000 grains troy, or 82f pounds avoirdupois. The two native States of Alwar and Bikanir, which are supplied with silver coin under the native coinage act, are also supplied with copper coins struck at the Indian mints. Two other States, Dhar and Dewas, have also ceased to mint

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    Numisma, no. 3 [1961]

    1/10/1961

    Highlight: were products of the Bengal Presidency mint of Calcutta. (c) Prince of Wales Island coins struck in 1188 The particular Penang coin to which this mule reverse is linked was the first copper coinage for the island. All the present available evidence points to the fact that the coins were struck at the Calcutta mint prior to the sailing of the founding expedition which took possession of the island on 11 August 1786. I am not conversant with the English 18th century tokens, but in the solving of this problem, attention should be paid to the note by R. H. Williamson (Seaby’s Coin arid Medal Bulletin , 1957, p. 54) who points out that Lutwyche was the coiner of a series of

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 10]

    /1856

    Highlight: within the Bengal presidency. These were followed up by similar attempts at various other points wdthin the three presidencies ; the American plant- ers were shifted from one locality to another, with a view of testing the comparative qualities of soil ; in some instances model plantations were Digitized Original from UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 26]

    /1872

    Highlight: Those dated 1818 of the Bengal Presidency were worth 88.08; of the Madras Presi- dency, 87.10; of the Bombay Presidency, 87.09. Those dated 1835, during the reign of William IV., the value is 87.10. — Eckfeldt's Manual . Moeda D'Ouro, of Brazil, a gold coin of Petrus I. ; date, 1824 ; value, <£ 1 0s. Id. sterling. Moidore. A Portugese gold coin, first struck in 1688 ; in the year 1689, under the reign of Peter II., its value was 86.45 ; under the same reign those struck in 1705 the value was 86.59 ; during the reign of John V. those dating from 1714 to 1726 were valued 86 48. This coin continued to be struck until the yes r 1732. Digitized by L^ooQle

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    NI Bulletin

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: The larger gold Mohur of the Bengal Presidency of the East India Company in Calcutta was valued at one pound, seventeen shillings and sixpence. The Rupee of the East India Company, also widely circulated, was set at two shillings and sixpence. What went through Governor King’s mind when he evaluated the various coinage and set the values we can only speculate. However, the raising of a coin’s value was a risk he had to take if the drain on the available coinage was to be slowed. King was recalled after serving his appointed term. His period as Governor saw the expansion of New South Wales, Van Diemen’s Land and the development of sheep breeding and trade. He received the gratitude of King George III for his ‘great improvement of the Colony under his superintendence’. Philip Gidley King,

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    NI Bulletin

    1/3/2008

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. 1651- 1835. AR Rupee (1 1.60 g, 9h). Calcutta mint. Dated AH [1171]; RY 4 of Alamgir II (1757/8 AD). Persian legend with regnal year and mint / Persian legend with poetical couplet; AH date (off flan), mintmarks star and rosette. Cf. Pridmore 7 (regnal year 4 not listed, but see pp. 197-8); KM 8.2. The British East India Company opened a mint in Calcutta on 13th June 1757, having expelled the Nawab of Bengal from the city earlier in the year. From that date until 28th July, extremely rare mohurs and rupees were struck with the mint name Alinagar Kalkatah (Calcutta, the Port of God). At that point the mint name was changed to simply Kalkatah. The rare regnal year 4 rupees, not known but posited by Pridmore, were struck through 28th April 1758. During this period, on the 2

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 9, No.6

    1/6/1975

    Highlight: mint Basoda, city, mint, scarce, Gwalior State Bassein, city, mint, near Bombay, Portuguese Colony IMC Valentine/ Brown Valentine/ Gupta BCC/JNSI i960 JNSI 1939 Gupta IMC -4 Bednur (Nagar), city, mint, Mysore Bela (Beylah), city, mint, scarce, Baluchistan BCC/Valentine Bellary, city, mint, scarce, Mysore State Gupta Benares (Vamasi), city, mint (Hindu Holy City)Craig also (Muhammadabad) Bengal, Presidency, state Craig/ BCC 158

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 10, No.11

    1/11/1976

    Highlight: INDIA - BRITISH: Bengal Presidency - Trisul Pice Val. #21.67 and Similar to V67. Bombay Presidency - C212a - 1249/ 1833 . East India Co. - C3OO.3 - 1835B, 1858H; C301 - 1835c No Dot w/F; C303 - 1835 .B No Initial; Yla - l84lC (2 var.); Y2 - l84CM; Y2a - 1840C; Y3 - 1840C; Y 3 a - 1840C With WW Incuse; Y4 - 1840B No Init., 19 Berries, Lg. Diam. ; Y4a - 1840C WW Raised, 27 Berries (not in SCWC). . (To be continued) 395

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 11, No.5

    1/5/1977

    Highlight: the Bengal Presidency and miscellaneous mints of the East India Co. Since the beginning of British relations in India were with the Mughals - whose Empire Britain finally replaced and extinguished - many of the coins, particularly the later ones, are Islamic in nature. They reflect the beauty of the Persian-Mughal style and no Islamic collection would be complete without a good selection. The early coins issued were small and crude but with the advent of the 19 th century, many pieces are not only well struck, but also beauti- ful. Not only did the British adopt the Mughal standards but their im- portant supply of vast quantities of bullion and other metals for coinage had a great deal to do with the prosperity of the East India Company, but also with the gradually increasing measure of

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 16, No.10

    1/10/1982

    Highlight: When the Straits were administered as part of the Bengal Presidency (1830-1867) the official unit of currency was the Indian rupee although trade was carried on in foreign silver dollars supple- mented by copper coins issued by the East India Company. When the Straits came under the supervision of the British Colonial Office in 1867, the dollars of Mexico, Spain, Peru, Bolivia and Hong Kong were declared legal tender. In 1874 the dollars of Japan and the United States were also give the status of legal tender. 1 The variety of foreign dollars in both the Straits and Hong Kong re- sulted in confusion. Some were preferred over others. The Chambers of Commerce of Hong Kong and Singapore petitioned the British govern- ment to issue trade dollars, but the British rejected the proposal because o

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 10, No.11

    1/11/1976

    Highlight: INDIA - BRITISH: Bengal Presidency - Trisul Pice Val. #21.67 and Similar to V67. Bombay Presidency - C212a - 1249/ 1833 . East India Co. - C3OO.3 - 1835B, 1858H; C301 - 1835c No Dot w/F; C303 - 1835 .B No Initial; Yla - l84lC (2 var.); Y2 - l84CM; Y2a - 1840C; Y3 - 1840C; Y 3 a - 1840C With WW Incuse; Y4 - 1840B No Init., 19 Berries, Lg. Diam. ; Y4a - 1840C WW Raised, 27 Berries (not in SCWC). . (To be continued) 395

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    The Coin Book, comprising a History of Coinage; a synopsis of the Mint Laws of the United States; statistics of the coinage ... with engravings of the principal coins

    /1878

    Highlight: Those dated 1818 of the Bengal Presidency were worth $8.08; of tlie Madras Presi- dency, $7.10; of the Bombay Presidency, $7.09. Those dated 1835, during the reign of William IV., the value is $7.10. — Eckfeldfs Manual. Moeda D’Ouro, of Brazil, a gold coin of Petrus I. ; date, 1824 ; value, d£l Os. Id. sterling. Moidore. A Portugese gold coin, first struck in 1688 ; in the year 1689, under the reign of Peter II., its value was $6.45 ; under the same reign those struck in 1705 the value was $6.59 ; during the reign of John V. those dating from 1714 to 1726 were valued $6.48. TiuB coin continued to be struck until the year 1732.

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    The Numismatist, March 1988

    1/3/1988

    Highlight: 470 Five languages appear on the obverse of a I -pice copper coin (left) minted by the East India Company at the Calcutta mint for the Bengal Presidency in 1831; while only Urdu is used on the obverse of a silver 2 pagodas minted in 1810 for use in the Madras Presidency. dominantly English, a vestige remained of the Urdu of the former shahs, who now were mere shadows of their former selves but who, in theory, still carried some power. The first company rupee carried a portrait ot William IV on the obverse and the date 1 83 5 on the reverse. After William s death in 1 8 37 Victoria succeeded to the throne; her likeness then was used on the obverse of a new series of coins introduced in 1840 by the East India Company. At the time of the “Mutiny of 1857, ” opposition to the company s role in

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    THE COLLECTION OF COINS OF THE UNITED STATES FORMED BY MAJOR WILLIAM BOERUM WETMORE, U. S. A. OF NEW YORK CITY. AN ORIGINAL 1804 U.S. DOLLAR.

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. Mohur with Persian ins. trs “Defender of the Mohammedan faith, Reflec- tion of Divine excellence, the Emperor Shah au- lum has struck this coin to be current throughout the seven climes.” R. “Struck at Moorshedabad in the year 19 of his fortunate reign.” See illus- tration page 150, Atkins coins of the British Em- pire, 1889. Fine. India. Crescents, etc. About a 20th of a mohur. India. Victoria. Head 1. R. Lion and palm. Mo- hur, 1841. Very fine. India. Victoria. Bust in rich attire. Mohur, 1862. Very fine.

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    Rare Coins, Medals, Tokens, Paper Money, etc.

    Highlight: Bengal Presidency. Rifle Assn. 1891. Won by Corporal Young, for Rifle Shooting 1st Hants. Regt. Very heavy silver with swivel. Ex. Fine. First we have met with. 55 MM. Worth 3 or 4 dollars in silver. 1484 1860. England. The National Rifle Assn. View of Marksmen of 1300 and 1860, one armed with bow. Sit Perpetuum The National Rifle Assn 1860. By Sergt Major Hickey Bedford Aug. 27, 1867. With bar, swivel and ribbon. Heavy silver. 50 MM. Fine. Mayo 220 . 1485 1862. Rifle Assn. Championship medal of 1862. Lion reclining by tree Ready and True. Rx. Rifles, crown, etc. Rifle Assn of West- ern India. Ex. F. with ribbon and bar 3 8 MM. Unc. Rare. 148 6 Another, with a different ribbon. Inscribed E. Colston 2nd Battn Royal Scots Fusiliers Sergt. Instructor Musketry. Unc. Rare. SCOTCH CROWNS AND

    Ex. Charles Davis, 3/9/2002. One loose photographic plate depicting large cents.

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