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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1898

    Highlight: it is hard to realize that the magnificent quality of the horses and the perfect appointment of the harness classeseen acquired during even the last eight years. The average best of ’90 would in all probability get nothing better than the gate in ’98. I dis- tinctly remember the incongruities of livery, the confu- sion over the equipment respectively of Park and Rond fours, the agitation incident to turning out a tandem, the indistinction concerning classes, and the vague ideas re- garding form. A dozen years ago there were not more than a dozen men showing who, unaided, could turn out a perfectly appointed equipage. And the same comment applies to the average skill of driving: in those days. It was formerly really a rare treat to see a four handled properly in the ring or

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1897

    Highlight: Other classes that filled well and showed excellent qual- ity were the trotters. As usual, Village Farm was well to the fore in these classes, and carried off many first prizes. Their black stallion Dare Devil (2.09f) is a star of the first magnitude, not only winning the blue ribbon in ev- ery class where shown, but also showing some remark- able youngsters among his offspring. Their American Belle’ won also in the three - year - old filly class, and Chimes in the class of stallions shown, with four of his get. These are but a part of their winnings, but they show that the Hamlins are still in the frout rank in the quality of their stock. The Quartermasters are always good, but all had to take back seat in the two-year-old stnllion class to that great young horse Amby, 2.16}. The Shetland

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    Merchant's Magazine, 1870 (vol. 63)

    1/7/1870

    Highlight: some further insight may be obtained as to the distribution of the population among the various classes of dwellings. Mr. D. Baxter divides the population into what he terms the upper, and middle, and manual labor classes. In the upper and middle classes, he includes all persons with incomes from about £75 a year and upwards. In the manual labor classesngland and Wales in 1861 was in round figures 19,000,000,1 inhabiting 3,739,505 houses. Dividing the population on the principle named above, there would appear to have been then about 4.700.000 of tbe upper and middle classes, including those drp ndent on them* 15.200.000 of the manual labor elate, with the same addition. Mr. D. Baxter

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1883

    Highlight: WHAT SOCIAL CLASSES OWE TO EACH OTHER. By professor W. O. SUMNER. I. ON A NEW PHILOSOPHY : THAT POVERTY IS THE BEST POLICY. It is comtnoni y ussei ted that there are iii the United States no classes, and any allusion to class- es is resented. On the other hand, we constantly read and hear discussions of social topics in which the existence of social classeslabor- ers,” are expressions which are constantly used as if they had exact and well-understood detinition. Discussions are constantly made to bear upon the assumed rights, wrongs, and misfortunes of cer- tain social classesd w-riting consists, in a large measure, of the discus- sion of general plana for meeting the wiahe.s of classes of people

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1897

    Highlight: to see that they have followed Bos- ton in making classes for polo ponies. The polo and riding pony classesames socially, and of world-wide reputa- tion for horse knowledge, in the tight little island. The judging of these intelligent and highly bred little horses in the'ring will certainly be one of the most in- teresting spectacles of the whole show. It would seem, however, as though a mistake was made in demanding that entry to the polo -pony classes should be subject to the requirement “must have l>een used for polo witli some recognized polo club.” Polo is an expensive game to play, and can only be indulged in by

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1873)

    1/1/1873

    Highlight: and third classes in each section. Number of accounts of fourth and fifth classes in each section. Fii’st, second, and third classes. Fourth aud fifth classes. First, second, and third classes. Fourth and fifth classes. First, second, and . third classes. Fourth and fifth classes. Fourth and- fifth, classes. 2 1 75 17 9 758 79 15 93 4 511 45 ■Kentucky 3 .... 107 19 825 53 1,007 2, 276 17 141 - 61 2, 225 16 275 40 Iv 872 66 • 2 1 79 19 1 113 40 1,274 88 6 34 6 509 13 '568 6 »■»’ 5 66 13 378 . 7 Nebraska 1 43 7 328 54 433 2; 653 60 161 62 . 2, 591 12 45 2,237 132 1 . 1 9 ,2 ' 87 101 7 • 2 3 5 *2 ■ 10 9 81 36 1 93ft 71 1, 445 3 Pennsylvania, S to Z . . . 4 8 55 .15 '612 12 '706 2, 257 39 47 83 2, 169 15 20 145 53 1,940 84 t™. 16 9 136 38 1 10ft 50 1, 360 82. Michigan 11 .... 7 101 47 912 34

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1940)

    1/1/1940

    Highlight: 1933-40 by years and classes of: Banks (chart 10) 100 Holders (chart 8) 94 Certificates of indebtedness: Displaced by Treasury bills 58 Loan and tax series 760 Outstanding June and December 1932-34 60 Special issues 48,728,735 Composition of computed interest charge and interest rates, June 1932-40, by months (chart 6) 67 Composition of interest-bearing debt, by classes and by months, 1932-40, amounts and percentages (chart 5) 52 Conversion bonds, 726,730,744,772 Cumulative absorption of increase in direct and guaranteed debt outstanding since June 30, 1932: By classes of banks (chart 11) 104 By classes o'f holders (chart 9) 96 Deficit financing: 1933-40 by years. - 36,49 1940 and estimates for 1941 and 1942 712 Description of issues outstanding June 30, 1940 730 Discussion : 1932-40 49

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1897

    Highlight: or even of similar ex- treme craft in the medium classesossible to predict what will fill the void at present existing. The yachts of to day, the ones whicli have kept the sport alive through tlie seasons of ’96 and ’97, are of two kinds, those in which design and construction are entirely unhampered, and those built under special restrictions of the most strin- gent description. All of these craft belong in the smaller classes, of not over 30 feet water-line length, and the first of them are considerably under this limit. The contests for the Seawanliaka International Cup, covering the years ’95, ’96. and '97, have produced a fleet of racing-craft quite as extreme in design and con- struction as Defender herself, and open to all the objec- tions of extreme cost, fragile

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1898

    Highlight: have HABPEB’S weekly made a superb competition and a difficult one (or "'The saddle classes; r;: the judges. sidemWe 'advance on [ the ; «““' la £| ^Yatmrable poM ^actuai horse. _ Ajarger around Pltdadelphia horse, a iais CI — pi. 1 i.,d e lphia atm 'SrssnSffi was imported, several jeais as . .rnense, glnial "The elasses "^‘^e.’and lids year is no satisfactory conformation and^ .y ^ m(lt|er of manners exception in that respect., New York classes. ■ 1 - weakest point of the «» w T , 1u( j g i n g lArSSXeapos SWmSJSTvS-'?' .“=‘1^0^ tienlly, hut potlnnK result^l to tu substantial ^c^Sfy^dai- »dvanc g ed for iu type dve W U that, so far as carriage -horse is concerned, nQl a failure. Such, been an emphatic d'sqPP i U( ] ce cl by his appetence at the at least, i

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1996

    Highlight: but it is unlikely that the introduction of pennies of classes 15c and 15d substantially altered the overall pattern of coinage in circulation. The most obvious difference between Ednam and all the hoards considered by Mayhew lies in the proportion of Scottish coins. At Ednam there were 149, forming 10.13% of the total, whereas the percentage in the other hoards varied between 0.24 and 4.72, with only the latter figure (at Montrave) exceeding 2.80. With the exception of the atypical Renfrew hoard of 1963. 4 a Scottish proportion above 5% is unusual; the only recently reported hoard with a figure approaching that of Ednam is that from Whitburn, West Lothian (1989), with 8.64%. 5 (It may or may not be significant that the Whitburn hoard was dateable to 1317 - c. 1322, i.e. with a date of

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1996

    Highlight: but it is unlikely that the introduction of pennies of classes 15c and 15d substantially altered the overall pattern of coinage in circulation. The most obvious difference between Ednam and all the hoards considered by Mayhew lies in the proportion of Scottish coins. At Ednam there were 149, forming 10.13% of the total, whereas the percentage in the other hoards varied between 0.24 and 4.72, with only the latter figure (at Montrave) exceeding 2.80. With the exception of the atypical Renfrew hoard of 1963. 4 a Scottish proportion above 5% is unusual; the only recently reported hoard with a figure approaching that of Ednam is that from Whitburn, West Lothian (1989), with 8.64%. 5 (It may or may not be significant that the Whitburn hoard was dateable to 1317 - c. 1322, i.e. with a date of

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1995

    Highlight: meaning that two coins of London (the WILLEM and the RICARD) were probably produced from dies designed for use in what we now understand to be sequential sub-classes. The case for muling can be strengthened by citing the die-linked coins of ROBERD and C'OLDWINE. first identified by Allen, Taking the ROBERD first (no. 3). it is a mule of Class IVc/Val because, like the RICARD. it has a straight-barred A; it is also, of course, die-linked with no. 4. which is of Class Val proper. But what about the coin of COLDWINE (no. 1) whose reverse, lacking any mint signature, did not use an A (thus COLDWINE.ON)? In this case it was not a change of formal but a change of letter: the moneyer's name was made to start with a C. not a G. That is. the name was GOLDW1NE on all coins prior to Class V. and

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1996

    Highlight: but it is unlikely that the introduction of pennies of classes 15c and 15d substantially altered the overall pattern of coinage in circulation. The most obvious difference between Ednam and all the hoards considered by Mayhew lies in the proportion of Scottish coins. At Ednam there were 149, forming 10.13% of the total, whereas the percentage in the other hoards varied between 0.24 and 4.72, with only the latter figure (at Montrave) exceeding 2.80. With the exception of the atypical Renfrew hoard of 1963. 4 a Scottish proportion above 5% is unusual; the only recently reported hoard with a figure approaching that of Ednam is that from Whitburn, West Lothian (1989), with 8.64%. 5 (It may or may not be significant that the Whitburn hoard was dateable to 1317 - c. 1322, i.e. with a date of

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /2000

    Highlight: X c/b) 1282: £842,353 1282-90 £4 1 1 ,048 Class 4: 2,866 Classes 1-4: 7,854 1290: £1,126.438 1290-9 £53,707 Classes 5-8: 487 Classes 1-8: 8,032 1299: £885.780 1299-1310 £1.079.469 Classes 9 and 10: 8.878 Classes 1-10: 13,511 1310: £1,642,792 1310-19 £355.231 Classes 11-14: 1,552 Classes 1-14: 9,306 1319: £2.130,013 1319-31 £78,415 Class 15: 174 Classes3 Class 1 - ‘Florin’ coinage: 1,068 1351: £755.261 The estimates of pence in circulation, and the possible effect of wastage between the dates of estimation, can be tested by calculating the apparent volume of coins of classes 1-3 (1279-c. 1282) in circulation at each date. In Table 3 the volumes of coins of classes 1-3 have been calculated from the estimates of total penny

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 21, No.1

    1/1/1987

    Highlight: CLASSES Orders are usually divided into classes, from first class to fifth. The Order of the White Eagle has but one class. Virtuti Mi 1 i tari has five classes. The Order of Polonia Restituta also has five. Within the order array of the People's Republic of Poland we find: The Order of the Builders of the People's Republic of Poland has one class; The Order of Virtuti Mi li tari has five classes as has the Order of Polonia Restituta; and the Order of the Labor Banner has two classes. Classes are also used in crosses and medals. We thus find inter-war Poland and the Polish People's Republic issuing the Cross of Merit in three classes. And the People's Republic divided both the Medal of the Worthy on the Field of Battle-Lenino and the Medal of the Worthy on the Field of Battle-1944 also in

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 37]

    /1883

    Highlight: In 1872 the same two classes obtained only 4,41 per cent, of the National income. The persons belonging to these two classes- form only about one-tenth of one per cent, of the population, and obtain a growing share of the National income. The same result is reached if we take the three highest classes, including the two just mentioned, and also those having medium incomes of between $ 1 500 and $ 5000. These three classes obtained 12.2 per cent, of the total income in 1876, and 12.9 per cent, in 1881. They form about one per cent, of the population. It would appear from these figures that it is true, as is often asserted, that the rich are getting richer, while the poor are get- ting poorer. There is, however, one circumstance which modifies this conclusion. Although the proportion of the

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 21, No.1

    1/1/1987

    Highlight: CLASSES Orders are usually divided into classes, from first class to fifth. The Order of the White Eagle has but one class. Virtuti Mi 1 i tari has five classes. The Order of Polonia Restituta also has five. Within the order array of the People's Republic of Poland we find: The Order of the Builders of the People's Republic of Poland has one class; The Order of Virtuti Mi li tari has five classes as has the Order of Polonia Restituta; and the Order of the Labor Banner has two classes. Classes are also used in crosses and medals. We thus find inter-war Poland and the Polish People's Republic issuing the Cross of Merit in three classes. And the People's Republic divided both the Medal of the Worthy on the Field of Battle-Lenino and the Medal of the Worthy on the Field of Battle-1944 also in

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1868

    Highlight: Prices to suit all classes. It Is the only, as well as the cheapest, remedy ever offered the afflicted. Pho- tographic likenesses of cases before and after treat- ment. fnruiKhed on receipt of two 3 cent stamps. ttATIVE 1 St., N. Y.J MANHATTAN CO-OPERATIVE RELIEF ASSOCIATION. Office Manhattan Co-operative Relief Association, No. 658 Broadway, Cor. Bond St. TOE MANHATTAN CO-OPERATIVE RELIEF ASSOCIATION is chartered by the State of New York. OBJECT. The objsct of this Association is to secure a cash payment within forty days after the death of a member of as many dollars as there are members in the class to which he or she belongs, to his or her heirs. MEMBERSHIP FEES. The membership fees are six dollars at joining (for which a policy will be furnished), and one dollar and ten cents on the

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1897

    Highlight: di- vided into 267 classes, have never been sur- passed, as a whole, in this country, and only by judging several classes at the same time was each day’s programme completed. While the breeders and owners of trotters, the typ- ical American horse, were not represented as largely as one would have expected, the show was a triumph for the trotter from first to last. Not that the trotting classes were so remarkable, or that the trotters en- tered as such carried off many of the great- est honors of the show, but by reason of the fact that the harness-horse classes were com- posed almost exclusively of animals bred in trotting lines. Not only in the high-stepping classes, but even in the pony classes trotting blood was to the front. Mr. Arthur J. Ca- ton’s Caid 2.11 was facile princeps among

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1998

    Highlight: In terms of the classification of these three classes (PI. 6, 26-8), no revision can currently be made. The Status of the Classes D.F. Allen was heavily influenced by the then current theory that frequent periodic recoinages had been occurring about every three years since Anglo-Saxon times up until c. 1170. The reign of King Stephen was included in the theory: Brooke listed seven types for the eighteen-year reign, which works out at about two and a half years a type. On this basis it was thought that the abandonment of this system (if it did exist to any extent) occurred sometime during the Cross-and-Crosslets type. Allen noted that about three years after the introduction of the Cross-and-Crosslets type, when theoretically a change of type was expected, modifications in the design were

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    Harper's Monthly Magazine

    /1906

    Highlight: The same conditions prevail among the working classes in our great cities, except where the eight-hour law has been put in force. It has long been known that the laboring classessubject to an enormous number of diseases from which, according to popular impression, their “ active, natural life 99 ought to have pro- tected them. The percentage of cases of Bright’s disease, of heart-disease, of nervous breakdown, of insanity, is higher among them than in any of the so-called leisure classes. Nor can alcohol longer be made the universal scapegoat. Over- work is a far more potent factor in their production than drunkenness. The injurious effect of city life consists not merely in overcrowding or the in- creased

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 15-17

    /1969

    Highlight: 1-3 (Classes A and B) the date appeared in the exergue on the reverse. In year 3 (Classes C and D) it was beside the mark of value on the reverse. 18 In years 4-16 (Classes E-G) the date was restored to the exergue on the reverse. In years 15-17 (Classes5 (Class K) in the right obverse field. The change from the date’s normal place on the reverse was the result of devoting space on the reverse to three (Class J) or two (Class K) of Constan's sons. (3) One of a number of problems in this series is posed by the several classes which wer

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 15-17

    /1969

    Highlight: also indicated by the initial K above the mark of value on a few coins of Classes A and E and of most coins of Classesogram for himself but added K for his son, Heraclius Con- stantine. When the figure of Heraclonas was included in 639 only the monogram was used. Constans II's full name CONSTANTINVS was used only on his gold and silver coins and on some copper coins of western mints. (6) Constans II is represented without a beard in regnal years 1-6 (Classes A-E) when he was aged 13 to 17, with a slight beard in years 6 and 7 (Class

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 15-17

    /1969

    Highlight: 1-3 (Classes A and B) the date appeared in the exergue on the reverse. In year 3 (Classes C and D) it was beside the mark of value on the reverse. 18 In years 4-16 (Classes E-G) the date was restored to the exergue on the reverse. In years 15-17 (Classes5 (Class K) in the right obverse field. The change from the date’s normal place on the reverse was the result of devoting space on the reverse to three (Class J) or two (Class K) of Constan's sons. (3) One of a number of problems in this series is posed by the several classes which wer

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 15-17

    /1969

    Highlight: also indicated by the initial K above the mark of value on a few coins of Classes A and E and of most coins of Classesogram for himself but added K for his son, Heraclius Con- stantine. When the figure of Heraclonas was included in 639 only the monogram was used. Constans II's full name CONSTANTINVS was used only on his gold and silver coins and on some copper coins of western mints. (6) Constans II is represented without a beard in regnal years 1-6 (Classes A-E) when he was aged 13 to 17, with a slight beard in years 6 and 7 (Class

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 2]

    /1848

    Highlight: the laboring classesery steam engine stopped — every furnace blown out— every mine shut up — cutoff at once, and without any previous notice, the entire of the daily food of large numbers of persons. The suspension of commerce and credit not only deprives them of their immediate means, through wages, but in the long run renders scarcer and dearer the articles on which they depend for subsistence. Other classes of society have always some resources on which they can fail back, but with the great bulk of the laboring population of every country, anything that deprives them of em* ploymeni, deprives them of the daily necessaries of life. Without credit and confidence, commerce cannot be maintained, manufactures must

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/1/1904

    Highlight: could never see any reason for assuming that the lower classes arc in- trinsically better than the higher classes, lienee it seemed to him self-evident that if. while the higher elasses were predominant, they made laws which in one way or another favored themselves, it fol- lowed that now, when the lower classes are predominant in the British electorate, they also will give legislation a bias to their own advantage. Manifest us it always was. it seemed to Mr. Spencer still more manifest in the later decades of the nine- teenth century, that, so long as governmental action is unrestricted, the thing required is an equitable representation of interests; and that a system in which one interest is overwhelmingly represented (whether it be that of a smaller or larger section of the com- munity)

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1902

    Highlight: the tendency of the times is to the reintnxliiction of classeswhat may be popularly called “ modern plants practically drove out of our •rar- dens the old favorites, but did not replace them in point of beauty of coloring, varia- tion in form, nor in delicacy of perfume. One by one, the owners of spacious ffrounds, perhaps with memories of their boyhood days stroiigr within them, arranged, first of all, for the plantinp of classes and varieties «uch as they had known in their yonntier days. The old - fashioned Peony and its close relative the more modern Pjconia, the particolored perennial Phlox, the

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1989

    Highlight: Mules Within class 7 several mules have been noted between the various sub-classes from the London mint, as well as mules with other classes. It is difficult to distinguish mules and counter-mules between classes 7i and 7iii and 7iv as there is little difference between the three sub-classes. Mules, if they occur, would only be distinguished by the amount of damage sustained by the upright punch. As has been stated, no mules occur with obverses of sub-classes 7i. 7ii, and 7iii. The sub-class mules found are; 7iv/7ii. 7v77i. 7v/7ib. 7v/7iv. 7vi/7v, 7vii/7ii The other group of mules that occur arc between classes 7 and 6 and are found in the following combinations:- 7i/6b, 7vi.'6a, 7vi,/6b, 7vii/6a, 7vii/6b. 6a/7i. 6b/7i The mules that occur are generally found in only one or two specimens o

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1989

    Highlight: Mules Within class 7 several mules have been noted between the various sub-classes from the London mint, as well as mules with other classes. It is difficult to distinguish mules and counter-mules between classes 7i and 7iii and 7iv as there is little difference between the three sub-classes. Mules, if they occur, would only be distinguished by the amount of damage sustained by the upright punch. As has been stated, no mules occur with obverses of sub-classes 7i. 7ii, and 7iii. The sub-class mules found are; 7iv/7ii. 7v77i. 7v/7ib. 7v/7iv. 7vi/7v, 7vii/7ii The other group of mules that occur arc between classes 7 and 6 and are found in the following combinations:- 7i/6b, 7vi.'6a, 7vi,/6b, 7vii/6a, 7vii/6b. 6a/7i. 6b/7i The mules that occur are generally found in only one or two specimens o

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1989

    Highlight: Mules Within class 7 several mules have been noted between the various sub-classes from the London mint, as well as mules with other classes. It is difficult to distinguish mules and counter-mules between classes 7i and 7iii and 7iv as there is little difference between the three sub-classes. Mules, if they occur, would only be distinguished by the amount of damage sustained by the upright punch. As has been stated, no mules occur with obverses of sub-classes 7i. 7ii, and 7iii. The sub-class mules found are; 7iv/7ii. 7v77i. 7v/7ib. 7v/7iv. 7vi/7v, 7vii/7ii The other group of mules that occur arc between classes 7 and 6 and are found in the following combinations:- 7i/6b, 7vi.'6a, 7vi,/6b, 7vii/6a, 7vii/6b. 6a/7i. 6b/7i The mules that occur are generally found in only one or two specimens o

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1998

    Highlight: The percentage of muling between a class and other previous classes. (source: BMC and F. Elmore Jones Plates) latest class/muled with previous classes Number of mules Mules/Coins of latest Class Percentage B/A 5 5/91 5% C/A,B 25 25/295 8% D/A.B.C 4 4/148 3% E/A.B,C,D 10 10/83 12% E/A.B.C 6 6/83 7% The lower proportion of mules between Class D and classes prior to it (3%) suggests that it represents a administrative reform through a withdrawal of previous dies, as well as a significant change in design. D.F. Allen suggested that there may have been an inquisition of moneyers before Class D. 3 - However, the high proportion of Class E dies muled with earlier dies excluding D (7%) contradicts this conclusion. An explanation may be that because Class D was a reform of the design, new pairs wer

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    Maryland TAMS Journal, Vol. 7, No. 3 (29)

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: CLASSES THAT WERE TO GIVE A GOOD ACCOUNT OF THEMSELVES IN COMPETITION. THE GERMANIA LADIES CLASSESITH SERIOUS FINANCIAL PROBLEMS. THE BALTIMORE TURNERS LEASED ITS PROPERTY TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IN 1943 TO BE USED AS APARTMENTS AS AN EMERGENCY WAR MEASURE AND THE VORWAERTS SOLD ITS PROPERTY TO THE CITY GOVERNMENT. EACH CLUB ACQUIRED TEMPORARY QUARTERS FOR MEETING PURPOSES. IN 1947 THE BALTIMORE TURNERS TOOK THE INITIATIVE IN REVIVING GYM CLASSES

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    The Nor'wester

    1/4/2009

    Highlight: New Classes and Instructors The 41st annual Summer Seminar in Colorado Springs will offer students a menu of two-day and five-day classes, introduce a number of new courses that reflect current trends in the hobby, and feature several new in- structors, who are recognized as leaders in the hobby. For the first time in Summer Seminar history, students can choose to take two, two-day classes or one five-day class during either session, June 27 - July 3, or July 4- 10. This year’s educational event features more than 20 new classesourse; the return of a working mini-mint; a public meeting of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Com- mittee, as well as time-honored classes and activities that have helped make Summer Seminar so successful. “Last

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1873)

    1/1/1873

    Highlight: and third classes in each section. Number of accounts of ■fourth and fifth classes iu each section. First, second, and third classes. Fourth and fifth classes. First, second, and third classes. .d (d & TO J3-5 ? o s o First, second, and third classes. Fourth aud fifth classes. Fourth and. fifth classes. 5 3 8 120 11 37 864 7 8 .52 8 12 10 4 2 76 7 365 • 16 480 ■ 7 ... .. Massachusetts 1.2 * 1 39 119 41 504 20 736 2, 504 29 36 158 2, 346 34 8 57 367 67 1,886 85 ' 's New York, A to S '31 34 403 71 1,628 227 2, 394 21 136 2, 25S 31 34 403 71 1,628 227 Pennsylvauia, A to R- .. 9 1 36 135 41 2.097 13 2, 332 55 86 2, 246 9 1 36 135 41 2, 097 13 2 8 81 36 973 70 1,170 ...... 25 1, o 25 5 612 14 ’ 659 31 2 10 4 80 2 102 Coimecticui 8 .... 14 82 18 281 26 429 2,360 8 64 104 2, 256 13 28 198 63 1,94

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    Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances (1963)

    1/1/1963

    Highlight: Call and maturity classes, 1946-63 504 Maturity classes and investor classes934-63, June 30 498 1946-63, semiannually, chart 18 1963, June 30 528 1963 and estimates 1964 and 1965, June 30 485 Limitation, statutory ; Amounts subject to, June 30; 1938-63 433 1963 - 533 Legislative history 534 Temporary increases authorized 1963 and 1964 . 31, 274, 280, 282, 285 Per capita 1934-63 498 Ownership ; 1941-63, selected dates, by investor classes 37 1954-63, June 30, by investor classes... 626 1959-63, June 30, by Government agencies and accounts 637 1961, March through October 1962.. 292 1962 and 1963, June 30, by investor classes, type of security, and maturity classes 624 1963 by investor classes, chart 36 Estimated changes

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    Maryland TAMS Journal, Vol. 7, No. 3 (29)

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: CLASSES THAT WERE TO GIVE A GOOD ACCOUNT OF THEMSELVES IN COMPETITION. THE GERMANIA LADIES CLASSESITH SERIOUS FINANCIAL PROBLEMS. THE BALTIMORE TURNERS LEASED ITS PROPERTY TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IN 1943 TO BE USED AS APARTMENTS AS AN EMERGENCY WAR MEASURE AND THE VORWAERTS SOLD ITS PROPERTY TO THE CITY GOVERNMENT. EACH CLUB ACQUIRED TEMPORARY QUARTERS FOR MEETING PURPOSES. IN 1947 THE BALTIMORE TURNERS TOOK THE INITIATIVE IN REVIVING GYM CLASSES

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    The Nor'wester

    1/4/2009

    Highlight: New Classes and Instructors The 41st annual Summer Seminar in Colorado Springs will offer students a menu of two-day and five-day classes, introduce a number of new courses that reflect current trends in the hobby, and feature several new in- structors, who are recognized as leaders in the hobby. For the first time in Summer Seminar history, students can choose to take two, two-day classes or one five-day class during either session, June 27 - July 3, or July 4- 10. This year’s educational event features more than 20 new classesourse; the return of a working mini-mint; a public meeting of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Com- mittee, as well as time-honored classes and activities that have helped make Summer Seminar so successful. “Last

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    Merchant's Magazine, 1840 (vol. 2)

    1/1/1840

    Highlight: CLASSES. This department is in a progressive condition, and continues to receive encouragement. Many have availed themselves of the opportunity thus presented, of acquiring a knowledge of the modem languages, drawing, and elocution. The board, sensible of the importance of classes, have adopted rules for their government, with the view of aiding their pros- perity, and promoting a friendly intercourse between the board and the teachers. There are six classes engaged Xmder Mr. Bekeart, in the study of the French language. The meetings of the two principal classes are held in this building. Those of the remaining four, owing to want of room, at the private residence of the instructor. The whole number at pre- sent under the tuition of this gentleman is 123 ; who have expressed to the board

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    Merchant's Magazine, 1870 (vol. 63)

    1/7/1870

    Highlight: The secondary classes, such as bakers, butchers, publicans, grocers, tailor?, milliners, carpenters, blacksmiths, carriers, cab drivers, domestic servants, clergymen, doctors, and schoolmasters, are a part of the popu- lation with which every one must needs be familiar ; but the primary classes are not often resorted to by the general public, nor do their productions or services reach]tke consumer, as a rule, except through the intermediation of some of the secondary classes. The secondary classesn towns or rural districts, on the coast or in the interior, among the rich and poor alike, though varying in their numbers. None of the primary classes exist everywhere ; in towns, agriculture cannot of course be carried on, and there are many rural districts in which

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1868

    Highlight: Prices to suit all classes. It is the only, as well a the cheapest, remedy ever offered the afflicted. Pho- tographic likenesses of cases before and after treat- ment ftimistaed on receipt of two 3 cent stamps. GRANT and COLFAX. For the best Campaign Medals, Pins, and Badges of GRANT & COLFAX, send to the oldest and most re- spectable manufacturers, who have made this business a specialty for the past nineteen years. We have now ready a great variety of all styles. Prices from $3 to $10 per 100. We will send to any address, postpaid, on receipt of price, One Sample, 25c., Three Samples, 50c., with Price-List. We request our Correspondents to he brief, as we are always very busy daring the Campaign. We make suitable redactions on all large orders for Dealers and Clubs. Al l moneys sent by

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1868

    Highlight: ten classes for men, aud ten classes for women. As soon as these classes are filled ten new classes will be adopted. Men and women are not allowed in the same classes ages of 35 aud 40 yrs. Iu class F all persons betw’n the ages of 40 and 45 yrs. In class G all persons betw’n the ages of 45 aud 50 yrs. Iu class H all persons betw’n the ages of 50 and 55 yrs. Iu class I all persons betw’n the uges of 55 aud 60 yrs. In class K all persons betw’n the ages of 60 and 65 yrs. The classes for

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1868

    Highlight: Prices to suit all classes. It is the only, as well as the cheapest, remedy ever offered the afflicted. Pho- tographic likenesses of cases before and after treat- ment furnished on receipt of two 3 cent stamps. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN /rrva | N. Y.J MANHATTAN •CO-OPERilTIVE RELIEF ASSOCIATION. Office Manhattan Co-opf.rativ* Relief Association, No. 658 Broadway, Cor. Bond St., THE MANHATTAN CO-OPERATIVE RELIEF ASSOCIATION is chartered by the State of New York. OBJECT. The object of this Association is to secure a cash payment within forty days after the death of a member of as many dollars as there are members in the class to which he or she belongs, to his or her heirs. MEMBERSHIP FEES. The membership fees are six dollars at joining (for which a policy will be furnished), and one dollar and

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    Harper's Weekly

    /1883

    Highlight: [to hs ooNTiNcan.] WHAT SOCTAL CLASSES OWE TO EACH OTHER. BV PROFESSOR W. G. SUMNER. II. THAT A FREE MAN IS A SOVEREIGN, BUT THAT A SOVEREIGN CAN NOT TAKE “ TIPS.” A FREE man, a free country, liberty, and equal- ity are terms of constant use amongst us. 'They are employed as watch-words as soon as any so- cial questions come into discussion. It is right that they should be so used. They ought to contain the broade.st convictions and most posi- tive faiths of the nation, and so they ought to l)e available for the decision of questions of detail. In onier, however, that they may be so employed successfully and correctly, it is essential that the terms should Ije correctly defined, and that their popular use should conform to correct definitions. No doubt it is generally believed that the

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1990

    Highlight: It will be apparent from the foregoing discussion that the Burns nomenclature of groups and classes, both designated by Roman numerals, is cumbersome. For this reason a simplified notation was adopted in The Scottish Coinage, whereby the three classes of Burns group I were labelled B, A and C, and the three classes of group II, D, E and F plus G. The reasons for the reversal of the order of the first two classes are discussed further below. The division of group II, class III into classesartly on the busts and partly on lettering, did not prove sustainable, and had the consequence that reverse dies involved in mules with the other two classes of group II had to be described as FG, since the differences of lettering were not sufficiently clear-cut. Some late and rather crud

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1990

    Highlight: in order to try to establish the sequence of classes and their relationship from the use of the punches for elements of the portrait, the crown, hair, face and neck, in addition to the more obvious division by epigraphy. The basic definition of classes, however, remains determined according to lettering, this having the advantage of enabling mules between classes to be readily identified. In summary, our conclusions are that the coinage began with class A; that A leads into C and then FG, which comprise the main series of the coinage; that B stands outside this sequence, probably running alongside the middle and later stages of A and then C; that C-FG was followed by E and D in that order, with R as a very small element between FG and E or alongside E. The main series (C-FG) we have

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1990

    Highlight: SINGLE-CROSS STERLINGS OF ALEXANDER III 43 classes of his group II. Without a die-study of the coinage it is not possible to assess with any precision the ratio of obverses to reverses in the various classesn various hoards yields some surprising results. In the mint of 26 points, 18 per cent of the total coins have class D obverses, while 50 per cent have reverses of that class; 31 per cent have M obverses but only 7 per cent have M reverses. This imbalance between obverses and reverses of the classes applies to a lesser degree to other mints. A comparable mismatch is to be found in the issue of English dies in 1300 to London and Newcastle, London receiving more obverse dies of early group X and more reverse dies of group IX, Newcastle

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    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1990

    Highlight: It will be apparent from the foregoing discussion that the Burns nomenclature of groups and classes, both designated by Roman numerals, is cumbersome. For this reason a simplified notation was adopted in The Scottish Coinage, whereby the three classes of Burns group I were labelled B, A and C, and the three classes of group II, D, E and F plus G. The reasons for the reversal of the order of the first two classes are discussed further below. The division of group II, class III into classesartly on the busts and partly on lettering, did not prove sustainable, and had the consequence that reverse dies involved in mules with the other two classes of group II had to be described as FG, since the differences of lettering were not sufficiently clear-cut. Some late and rather crud

    Read more

    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1990

    Highlight: in order to try to establish the sequence of classes and their relationship from the use of the punches for elements of the portrait, the crown, hair, face and neck, in addition to the more obvious division by epigraphy. The basic definition of classes, however, remains determined according to lettering, this having the advantage of enabling mules between classes to be readily identified. In summary, our conclusions are that the coinage began with class A; that A leads into C and then FG, which comprise the main series of the coinage; that B stands outside this sequence, probably running alongside the middle and later stages of A and then C; that C-FG was followed by E and D in that order, with R as a very small element between FG and E or alongside E. The main series (C-FG) we have

    Read more

    The British Numismatic Journal and Proceedings of the British Numismatic Society

    /1990

    Highlight: SINGLE-CROSS STERLINGS OF ALEXANDER III 43 classes of his group II. Without a die-study of the coinage it is not possible to assess with any precision the ratio of obverses to reverses in the various classesn various hoards yields some surprising results. In the mint of 26 points, 18 per cent of the total coins have class D obverses, while 50 per cent have reverses of that class; 31 per cent have M obverses but only 7 per cent have M reverses. This imbalance between obverses and reverses of the classes applies to a lesser degree to other mints. A comparable mismatch is to be found in the issue of English dies in 1300 to London and Newcastle, London receiving more obverse dies of early group X and more reverse dies of group IX, Newcastle

    Read more
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