Skip to content

NNP Library //Library Search

117 records found.

    Page 1 of 3

    connecticut mint

    NEW BOOK: ABEL BUELL AND THE CONNECTICUT AND FUGIO COINAGES

    07/19/2015

    Highlight: He has written several award winning articles on numismatic topics and this current work grew from Chris’ interest in the Connecticut Mint and the man who designed and struck America’s first official coins.

    A graduate of Marshall University and West Virginia University College of Law, Chris served as an officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps and was stationed in Korea, Germany, Bosnia, and Kansas. Chris practices law in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lives with his wife Annah and three children.

    Here's the table of contents (minus page numbers, for readability here). This is an impressive compilation of information. I'm looking forward to the book. -Editor

    Introduction

    Part I: THE EARLY YEARS

    Chapter 1: The Master’s Apprentice

    NEW BOOK: ABEL BUELL AND THE CONNECTICUT AND FUGIO COINAGES

    07/19/2015

    Highlight: interest in the Connecticut Mint and the man who designed and struck America’s first official coins.

    A graduate of Marshall University and West Virginia University College of Law, Chris served as an officer in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps and was stationed in Korea, Germany, Bosnia, and Kansas. Chris practices law in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lives with his wife Annah and three children.

    Here's the table of contents (minus page numbers, for readability here). This is an impressive compilation of information. I'm looking forward to the book. -Editor

    Introduction

    Part I: THE EARLY YEARS

    Chapter 1: The Master’s Apprentice
    Chapter 2: Crime and Punishment
    Chapter 3: Abe

    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2010

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: transferring 24,284 lbs of raw copper from the Federal mint account to the Connecticut mint account. A note accompanies the entry: To Connecticut Mint for the above 24,284 lb copper taken from the Federal Mint & made into Coppers for the account of Connecticut Mint, being a part of which is included in the whole quantity the Federal Mint has for by the General Account of Copper which must now go to the credit of the Connecticut Mint & reduces the quantity delivered the work by the Federal Mint, so much . . . This transfer of just over 1 2 tons of raw copper between mints confirms many people’s suspicions that Federal copper was used to manufacture Connecticut coins. Since the account book entries begin in February 1788, one year after Jarvis began to receive Federal copper stock, it is

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2010

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: transferring 24,284 lbs of raw copper from the Federal mint account to the Connecticut mint account. A note accompanies the entry: To Connecticut Mint for the above 24,284 lb copper taken from the Federal Mint & made into Coppers for the account of Connecticut Mint, being a part of which is included in the whole quantity the Federal Mint has for by the General Account of Copper which must now go to the credit of the Connecticut Mint & reduces the quantity delivered the work by the Federal Mint, so much . . . This transfer of just over 1 2 tons of raw copper between mints confirms many people’s suspicions that Federal copper was used to manufacture Connecticut coins. Since the account book entries begin in February 1788, one year after Jarvis began to receive Federal copper stock, it is

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2010

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: transferring 24,284 lbs of raw copper from the Federal mint account to the Connecticut mint account. A note accompanies the entry: To Connecticut Mint for the above 24,284 lb copper taken from the Federal Mint & made into Coppers for the account of Connecticut Mint, being a part of which is included in the whole quantity the Federal Mint has for by the General Account of Copper which must now go to the credit of the Connecticut Mint & reduces the quantity delivered the work by the Federal Mint, so much . . . This transfer of just over 1 2 tons of raw copper between mints confirms many people’s suspicions that Federal copper was used to manufacture Connecticut coins. Since the account book entries begin in February 1788, one year after Jarvis began to receive Federal copper stock, it is

    Read more

    THE COLONIAL NEWSLETTER AUGUST 2017

    08/13/2017

    Highlight: This issue is very large and contains the first half of the 1787 Connecticut Mint transcripts – this document is actually Mark Leavenworth’s daily ledger book.

    Randy Clark and I, along with teams of assistants, have transcribed all of the entries for 1787, which is the period when Mark Leavenworth maintained an ownership interest in the Connecticut mint. The ledger reveals, among other interesting discoveries, that blanks for Connecticut coppers were processed at a mill in Hamden, Connecticut, and transported the short distance to Leavenworth’s store in New Haven where they were struck on a press at his shop.

    There were, in my opinion, multiple presses in New Haven striking Connecticut coppers in 1787, with at least one other press located at Abel Buell’s shop. This

    Christopher McDowell is the editor of The Colonial Newsletter. He kindly se

    Read more

    Kagin's 339th Sale: The Baltimore Sale

    Highlight: 863 1935 Connecticut Mint State 65/65. OUTSTANDING. An extremely beautiful example of this date exhibiting lustrous surfaces accented by light violet, red, amber and green toning on the obverse. A scarce and difficult date this nice. (See color photo.) 864 1935 Connecticut Mint State 65/65. This is another origina example exhibiting slightly more subdued mint lustre accentec by light peripheral original toning. Another pleasing an c desirable example of this date. 865 1935 Connecticut Mint State 65/65. Light original toning ovei lustrous mark free surfaces. A third exceptional example of this type. 866 1935 Connecticut Mint State 63/65. Fully lustrous on both sides. A few marks on the reverse. 867 1936 Delaware Mint State 65/65. Attractive light voilet anc amber obverse and reverse toning.

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 49

    1/7/1977

    Highlight: Hickcox's OBSERVATIONS on the CONNECTICUT MINT. (RF-59) The following paragraph is extracted from John H. Hickcox's book "An Historical Account of American Coinage" published in 1858: In April 1786, James Jarvis became a partner, lie having purchased the interest of Edwards and Ship- man and a part of that of Mr. Ingersol. The com- pany soon met with an obstacle in not being able to command a supply of stock, and for want of this insuflieieney, they wero obliged some time during the ensuing summer to suspend operations. On the 10th of September of tlio same year, under a bond to conform to the act of tlio legislature, they leased the mint to Mark Leavenworth for six weeks, or so many days in addition as the works should be useless by reason of the failure of any of the implements. Those

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 49

    1/7/1977

    Highlight: Hickcox's OBSERVATIONS on the CONNECTICUT MINT. (RF-59) The following paragraph is extracted from John H. Hickcox's book "An Historical Account of American Coinage" published in 1858: In April 1786, James Jarvis became a partner, lie having purchased the interest of Edwards and Ship- man and a part of that of Mr. Ingersol. The com- pany soon met with an obstacle in not being able to command a supply of stock, and for want of this insuflieieney, they wero obliged some time during the ensuing summer to suspend operations. On the 10th of September of tlio same year, under a bond to conform to the act of tlio legislature, they leased the mint to Mark Leavenworth for six weeks, or so many days in addition as the works should be useless by reason of the failure of any of the implements. Those

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2010

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: The Connecticut mintage sample.) Raw material was held in the General Account of Copper and transferred to a mint for production. After completion, the finished coins were transferred back to the General Accormt for shipment. For instance, a record appears on September 13, 1788, transferring 979 lbs of locally purchased old copper (i.e. recycled from household goods) from the General Account to the Connecticut mint for processing. Coimecticut copper references will be discussed in more detail in another article. 6

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 125

    1/4/2004

    Highlight: Even under the best conditions available to Abel Buell at the authorized Connecticut mint, the weights of his legal coppers varied among themselves by an average of ±8.2%. For example, the average weights of his 1785 and 1786 Mailed Bust issues ranged from 124.1 to 146.5 grains (1 35.3 ±1 1 .2) just barely achieving the legal standard of 1 44.0 grains. The Draped Bust Left issues of 1 786 and 1 787, and the 1 787 Mailed Bust Left varieties, on the average, exceeded, or were only a fraction shy of, the required 144.0-grain goal. 43 Even as these average weights approached more closely the statutory weight requirement, there was no decrease in their standard deviations indicating that while they were heavier, their individual variation was unaltered showing no improved precision in the

    Read more

    Cumulative Index to Penny-Wise, Vol. 1-20

    15/11/1984

    Highlight: James Biographical vignette XX 271 Connecticut mint X 99 Query X 146 Query XV 198 Hilt, Robert P. „ “Die varieties of early United States coins (book) XIII 240 Hines, Henry, Biographical data XIII 240 Hines, Henry, cent collection IV 43 Hines, Henry Clay, Biographical vignette V 74 Hines, Henry Clay, reminiscences of XV 266 Hipps, Ed, photo VI 66 Hoard of coins, description 1 IV 38 136 Hoard, definition Hobson, Burton, “Coin collecting for beginners" IV 136 (with F. Reinfeld), review Hobson, Burton, "Stamp collecting for beginners," review XVII 131 Hodge, Stuart A. (Stu) Comment on “rarity pyramid" XX 312 “EAC 1987" XX 290 "Glass and fur at 'EAC 85 1/21 convention, XVII 77 or happenings at the Robinson 5. Brown sale" "The Jack Collins sale" XVI 55 Letter to editor XVII 223 Letter to editor

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2010

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: The Connecticut mintage sample.) Raw material was held in the General Account of Copper and transferred to a mint for production. After completion, the finished coins were transferred back to the General Accormt for shipment. For instance, a record appears on September 13, 1788, transferring 979 lbs of locally purchased old copper (i.e. recycled from household goods) from the General Account to the Connecticut mint for processing. Coimecticut copper references will be discussed in more detail in another article. 6

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 125

    1/4/2004

    Highlight: Even under the best conditions available to Abel Buell at the authorized Connecticut mint, the weights of his legal coppers varied among themselves by an average of ±8.2%. For example, the average weights of his 1785 and 1786 Mailed Bust issues ranged from 124.1 to 146.5 grains (1 35.3 ±1 1 .2) just barely achieving the legal standard of 1 44.0 grains. The Draped Bust Left issues of 1 786 and 1 787, and the 1 787 Mailed Bust Left varieties, on the average, exceeded, or were only a fraction shy of, the required 144.0-grain goal. 43 Even as these average weights approached more closely the statutory weight requirement, there was no decrease in their standard deviations indicating that while they were heavier, their individual variation was unaltered showing no improved precision in the

    Read more

    Cumulative Index to Penny-Wise, Vol. 1-20

    15/11/1984

    Highlight: James Biographical vignette XX 271 Connecticut mint X 99 Query X 146 Query XV 198 Hilt, Robert P. „ “Die varieties of early United States coins (book) XIII 240 Hines, Henry, Biographical data XIII 240 Hines, Henry, cent collection IV 43 Hines, Henry Clay, Biographical vignette V 74 Hines, Henry Clay, reminiscences of XV 266 Hipps, Ed, photo VI 66 Hoard of coins, description 1 IV 38 136 Hoard, definition Hobson, Burton, “Coin collecting for beginners" IV 136 (with F. Reinfeld), review Hobson, Burton, "Stamp collecting for beginners," review XVII 131 Hodge, Stuart A. (Stu) Comment on “rarity pyramid" XX 312 “EAC 1987" XX 290 "Glass and fur at 'EAC 85 1/21 convention, XVII 77 or happenings at the Robinson 5. Brown sale" "The Jack Collins sale" XVI 55 Letter to editor XVII 223 Letter to editor

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 26 (1913)

    /1913

    Highlight: who at one time was connected with the Connecticut Mint, and later with the Vermont and Machim Mints. In one account it was stated that the Connecticut Mint was rented to a man named Major Eli Leavenworth and others, known as Leavenworth & Co., and that there were made at this establishment in New Haven planchets or blanks which were struck in New York City with dies belonging to Leaven- worth & Co., or those who minted for them in New York City. It is sup- posed that all the above pieces were coined at Machin’s Mills. The die for the “Non Vi Virtute Vici” cent was thought to have been a pattern made by Atlee for Machim & Co. on his own account as an experimental piece to be submitted for adoption, probably before he joined forces with the latter. Of further interest is the statement that

    Read more

    Kagin's 1986 A.N.A. Auction

    Highlight: 1 095 1 935 Connecticut. Mint State 64/64, brilliant with a circular toning area on the bird. 1096 1935 Connecticut. Mint State 63/63, brilliant. Flashy but with a few little marks. 1097 1936 Delaware. Brilliant Mint State 65/65. Unusually sharp in strike on the obverse, with nice clean surfaces. 1098 1936 Delaware. Brilliant Mint State 65/65. Not quite as sharp as the last piece. 1099 1936 Delaware. Mint State 64/64, brilliant. Usual decent strike, lacking a touch of detail on the church. 1 100 1936 Delaware. Mint State 63/63, brilliant with a touch of gold toning. Planchet flaw on the obverse at 3 o'clock. DON'T STOP NOW! Late bids are often received after the sale, and in the case of tie bids, the first bid received will be awarded the lot. Mark your bid sheet care- fully and mail it

    Read more

    Robert Vlack Correspondence, 1960-1995

    /1960

    Highlight: I think all Connecticut pieces must be construed to be Connecticut Mint pieces unless they are tied in to known Machin’s production. Obviously others than Buell made dies for the Connecticut Mint. As far a a the Woods book is concerned, this is a matter which you must, determine. I do not knew its scope other than the die varieties. I believe it needs some new historical material to make it commercially saleable. If it is a labor of love, then you should have it published in any manner that suits you. As far as the Washington pi, tes are concerned, I want to do more than my share. If there are enough sold at 310 per set to pay for the project, then there is no problem. If there are not, then my thought was that the net out-of-pocket coot would be divided. Kindest personal regards.

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Winter 2010

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: The Connecticut mintage sample.) Raw material was held in the General Account of Copper and transferred to a mint for production. After completion, the finished coins were transferred back to the General Accormt for shipment. For instance, a record appears on September 13, 1788, transferring 979 lbs of locally purchased old copper (i.e. recycled from household goods) from the General Account to the Connecticut mint for processing. Coimecticut copper references will be discussed in more detail in another article. 6

    Read more

    NEWMAN PORTAL ADDS CONNECTICUT MINT ACCOUNT BOOKS

    12/18/2016

    Highlight: NEWMAN PORTAL ADDS CONNECTICUT MINT ACCOUNT BOOKS http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v19n51a04.html

    The latest additions to the Newman Numismatic Portal are Connecticut Copper Mint Account books from the New Haven Museum. Randy Clark provided the following report. Thanks! -Editor

    Commecticut Copper Mint account books It is rare in American colonial numismatics for original mint documents to survive the

    The latest additions to the Newman Numismatic Portal are Connecticut Copper Mint A

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Spring 2011

    1/3/2011

    Highlight: One anecdote Crosby pencils in at the bottom of p^e 106 in the Connecticut section is “* Dickeson tells me that an old man who said he once worked in the Connecticut mint, informed him that many of the obverse dies belonged to private parties, or firms, who, when ordering a lot of coins would send their own obverse, which would be coupled with whatever reverse die there belonging to the mint, might happen to come first to hand. He thus accounted for the different combinations of several reverses with the same obverse, and vice versa . S.S.C.”*° (Figure 3). I believe this is new information and impacts on our knowledge of how coins were distributed and the reason for the number of die combinations. to«H> iafrii,or IM oMWikfiK^u fer wImiE iW »«W wm a#-' ; awi •MttMjrmentiBl m twiMina] fcr,.

    Read more

    American Journal of Numismatics, Vols. 1-5

    1/5/1866

    Highlight: certainly none connected with the Connecticut mint, who was capable of producing a coin of such excellence and beauty as the auctori. plebis. It is also to be remembered, that the devices and inscriptions of the Connecticut copper money were fixed by law, to which the contractors for her coinage were bound, under a penalty, to conform. {Hickcox, pp. 33, 34.) It would have been a rather hazardous experiment, therefore, for them to intro- duce new varieties of coins, however interesting they might have been to the collectors of our day. “ If any other evidence were needed to establish the foreign origin of the piece in question, it is found in the fact that the reverse design is identical (date and legend excepted) with that of several English tokens of the period. I have before me three of

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 21 (1908)

    /1908

    Highlight: one-half in the new bills and one-half in the copper money of the proposed new Connecticut Mint. Very little attention, however, seems to have been paid to the petition of Higley's representative, although later Connecticut was flooded with the copper coin of private individuals. Every one of the varieties of the Higley pieces is rare, and the coins are but seldom offered for sale, owing to the few known being contained in the big collections, and even the celebrated Stickney collection, disposed of last year, contained but one specimen. All the pieces now located are in more or less- worn condition, due to extensive use and the extreme softness of the metal. If an uncirculated specimen of one of the varieties of the Higley threepence were to come to light and be offered for sale it would

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 60

    1/6/1981

    Highlight: one of the patentees of the Connecticut mint, removed from New Haven to Vermont, taking with him the dies used by his father, and that he went into the business of coin- ing with Mr. Harmon, in Rupert. It also appears that after the mint at New Haven ceased working in 1787 Major Eli Uavenworth One of the patentees had blank coppers sent to New York to be stamped, probably to the Atlee and Mackin “hardware” factory. Before proceeding to establish the connection of these coins with those of Vermont and Connecticut, I will say a word regarding the character of the evidence. b I'he first class of testimony to unity of minting is found in the recurrence of the same obverse with various reverses, or vice versa. It scarcely requires assertion, and will at once be admitted, that where two

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 71

    1/10/1985

    Highlight: Abel Buell entrusted the operation of the Connecticut Mint to son Benjamin, as the Committee report states, and it is reasonabie to suppose that he wouid have aiso entrusted the care of his toois as weii, among which would almost certainly have been

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 71

    1/10/1985

    Highlight: Benjamin would have had some ten weeks for operation at the New Haven Connecticut mint, following the Committee Inspection, during which time he could have produced whatever he desired. That planchets were available is evidenced by the Committee's statement that Benjamin "has Just begun" stamping coins. After June 20th 1789 It would have been Illegal for Benjamin Buell to continue manufacturing Connecticut Coppers but production of Fugios would have been of no concern to the State of Connecticut. It is not clear from their report whether Wadsworth and Holbrook physically inspected the mint facility or merely obtained depositions. Their report states that they met at the "...Dweling House of John Smith Inholder in New Haven ... and haveing examined touching the Premises We find ...". This

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 71

    1/10/1985

    Highlight: tion of Miiier die types in greater depth in a future article, it is mentioned here only to illustrate the existence of a common diesinking problem between the Club Ray Fugios and a particular group of Connecticut Coppers, a fact that i believe is important in supporting the proposition that the manufacture of the Club Ray Fugio dies and their striking took place in the latter days of the Connecticut mint and not at Machin's Miiis. J.C.Spilman

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 74

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: New Jersey Coppers The year following the award of the Connecticut mint franchise, a similar proposal reached the New Jersey legislature. The preamble to this statute, which was passed on June 1, 1786, summarized the problem succinctly (4). Whereas Copper Coin now current and passing in this State consists mostly of base Metal, and of copper so small and light as to be of very little real value, whereby the Citizens of the State are subject to manifest loss and inconvenience, and are liable to be greatly defrauded: for remedy whereof ... *** 1. Descriptive Catalogue . Vol. Ill, #3340, 945. 2. McCusker, Money and Exchange . 34. 3. Edward R. Barnsley, "The Bizarre Lettering of Connecticut Coppers", CNL, 356-367. 4. Crosby, Early Coins , 278. - 99 -

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 91

    1/7/1992

    Highlight: NH An interesting example of 1787 CT M 32.1 -X.3 offers suggestive hints that an automatic planchet feeder may have been used in one Connecticut mint in 1787, six years before Adam Eckfeldt is credited with the invention for the Philadelphia Mint. This specimen is owned by a New York collector, it weighs 131.7 grains, is 28.6 x 31.0 mm in diameter (horizontal x vertical), and its reverse die was oriented at 180 degrees, ortme "coin turn". The coin was quadruply stmck, the first strike being centered, the second being offset left 1 0% and the third offset in the same direction 30%. A final tab ^rike can be seen on the extreme left of the flan, occupying about 5% of the surface, and was caused by a blank planchet coming between the reverse coin face and die. James C. Spilman, ye olde editor

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter (Index, 1960-1996)

    27/8/1996

    Highlight: SAMUEL Believed to have operated a Connecticut Mint at New Haven. & Father-in-law of James Jarvis. 128, 277, 237, 443 “House” Owned by Samuel Broome 1784 to 1795 621 “Plan of the House and Land” 620 The New Haven Mint by Norman Bryant 614 Samuel Broome to Alexander Hamilton re: James Jarvis (TN-141) 1293 BROOME, AMELIA First wife of James Jarvis. 262 BRUCE, DAVID A Paper Presented by F. George Markham; March 9th, 1894 1151 BRUSH, ELIPALET The Brush of the original firm of Broome, Platt & Brush, from which he withdrew in 1784. 262 BRYANT, NORMAN One of the original Patrons of The Colonial Newsletter; 20th century collector and researcher on the Connecticut Coppers. Dick Picker’s “Box of Stuff” and Bryant’s Desire to Update “Miller” 905 The New Haven Mint 613-621 BUCKLEY, RICHARD F. A

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter (Index, 1960-1996)

    27/8/1996

    Highlight: Hickcox’s Observations on the Connecticut Mint (RF-59) 591 HIGGIE, Lincoln W. Author of The Colonial Coinage of the U. S. Virgin Islands 330 HIGLEY, JOHN A blacksmith and copper-mine operator of Granby, Connecticut who struck and distributed private coppers dated 1737 and 1739. 8 HIGLEY COPPERS See also HIGLEY, JOHN above. Bolen copy In pewter 8 HILLEGAS, MICHAEL See also FLINT, ROYAL Treasurer of the United States who held Fugio Cents for 14 months after their delivery by James Jarvis 289 HINKLEY, ROBERT I. A Small Hoard of Vermont Coppers 31 1 HISTOGRAMS Weight Histograms of Fugio Cents and Virginia Halfpence 1053 HISTORICAL MAGAZINE Original Manuscript of “The Earliest New York Token” for Historical Magazine (May 1861) 736 HISTORY of CNL A Short History of the “Early Issues” of The

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter (Index, 1960-1996)

    27/8/1996

    Highlight: Hickcox’s Observations on the Connecticut Mint 591 RF-60 Do Nelson 6 & 7 VOCE POPULI Actually Have Different Obverse Dies? 606 RF-61 What Happened to Lord Baltimore? 610, 625 RF-62 The First Collegiate Medal in America 653, 680, 689, 693 RF-63 Thirteen Linked Rings of Early American Unity 687 RF-64 Did New Jersey Coppers Officially Circulate in 1792? 1152 RF-65 Maris’ New Jersey Book Puzzle 1415 RF-66 Hessian Payments 1415, 1440 RF-67 Unlisted Betts Muling 1634 RF-68 New Bar Cent Copy? 1635 RF-69 Gold 1783 Washington Restrike?1635 RETZ, ROB In Search of Reuben Harmon’s Vermont Mint and the Original Mint Site (TN-172 ) 1655 RHODE ISLAND The Appleton-Massachusetts Historical Society Rhode Island Ship Token with Vlugtende. (TN-129) 1128 Rhode Island 1778-9 with Vlugtende (RF-7) 73,254 Rhode

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter (Index, 1960-1996)

    27/8/1996

    Highlight: Fugio Rarity Table (1963) 74 Fugio Rarity Table (1972) 326 Fugio Rarity Table (1984) 887 Fugio Rarity Table (1991) 1239 Hickcox’s [John H.] Observations on the Connecticut Mint (RF-59) 591 Lost CNL Folder , The 1504 MOS, Odd and Curious Connecticut MOS Specimens. 460-470 MOS, More Odd and Curious Connecticut MOS Specimens 515-518 New Jersey WHATSIT? Additional Information on (TN-102A) Comment on. 910,918,1394 New Machin’s Mills Die Variety Vlack24-72C (TN-1 00) Comment on. 908 New FUGIO Reverse LL (TN-55) 537 New Club Ray Fugio Variety 23-ZZ 153 Observations Regarding “On Hardening Steel Dies at the First United States Mint — The Eckfeldt Process — (G-1A) 544 Overview of Early American Coinage Technology 765,780,799,812 Privateering Interests of the Connecticut Coiners (TN-43) 443 “Quantit

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 108

    1/8/1998

    Highlight: the site of one Connecticut mint mentioned by Crosby, is two miles to the west of New Haven and 17 miles from the Fairfield County Stepney. The other mint at Morris Cove is about 19 miles away. {Courtesy of the Harvard Colleetion.) specimens but there are some that have some corrosion on them even though they are uncircuiated.^'' Eric Newman reported that some of the halfpence he examined showed signs of residual encrustation.®® In the catalogue published here, Breen refers to coin 82 as having showing probable effect of the “gravel” and this description is repeated for six more specimens. Again, we don’t know the environmental factors under which the coins were stored except that many seemed to have escaped significant damage after 162 years in an iron/dirt milieu. How is this possible?

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 110

    1/4/1999

    Highlight: Hickcox’s Observations on the Connecticut Mint 591 RF-60 Do Nelson 6 & 7 VOCE POPULI Actually Have Different Obverse Dies? 606 RF-61 What Happened to Lord Baltimore? 610, 625 RF-62 The First Collegiate Medal in America 653, 680, 689, 693 RF-63 Thirteen Linked Rings of Early American Unity 687 RF-64 Did New Jersey Coppers Officially Circulate in 1792? 1152,1669 RF-65 Maris’ New Jersey Book Puzzle 1415 RF-66 Hessian Payments 1415, 1440, 1688 RF-67 Unlisted Betts Muling 1634 RF-68 New Bar Cent Copy? 1635,1687 RF-69 Gold 1783 Washington Restrike? 1635

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 140

    1/8/2009

    Highlight: It is not even known what coins are referred to in the Connecticut mint report where it is said that Maj. Eli Leavenworth had coppers made in New York (Machin’s Mills) which were similar to Connecticut coinages. For over ten years the writer has been gathering data on Machin’s Mills to write up the subject and sincerely needs the cooperation of many numismatists. If the joint efforts of any- one who has any relative data were pooled substantial further progress can result. We are on the threshold of adding a new series of American coins. No fact is too obvious to restudy, no prior statement exempt from challenge, no eighteenth century George HI British half- penny too unimportant to examine. What can you add to this subject? The records of Thomas Machin are still to be located. They were

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 144

    1/12/2010

    Highlight: CA While researching Connecticut mint history in eighteenth-century New Haven newspapers, a notice was discovered relating to an act of the Rhode Island General Assembly authorizing the coining of silver and copper money. Further research traced the original notice back to an article in the United States Chronicle, which indicated that the act was passed in the legislative sessions of December 1786, held in East Greenwich.^ This discovery places Rhode Island among the last states to seriously con- sider the production of their own coin- age after the Revolution. The Republic of Vermont was first, granting rights as of July 1, 1785; Connecticut followed on October 20, 1785; New Jersey on June 1, 1786; and Massachusetts on October 17, 1786; New York heard proposals in early 1787, but failed

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, Index (1960-2016)

    27/1/2016

    Highlight: SAMUEL Believed to have operated a Connecticut Mint at New Haven. & Father-in-law of James Jarvis. 128, 277, 237, 443 “House’’ Owned by Samuel Broome 1784 to 1795 621 “Plan of the House and Land” 620 The New Haven Mint by Norman Bryant 614 Samuel Broome to Alexander Hamilton re: James Jarvis (TN-141) 1293 BROOME, AMELIA First wife of James Jarvis. 262 BRUCE, DAVID A Paper Presented by F. George Markham; March 9th, 1894 1151 BRUSH, ELIPALET The Brush of the original firm of Broome, Platt & Brush, from which he withdrew in 1784. 262 BRYANT, NORMAN One of the original Patrons of The Colonial Newsletter; 20th century collector and researcher on the Connecticut Coppers. Dick Picker’s “Box of Stuff" and Bryant’s Desire to Update “Miller" 905 The New Haven Mint 613-621 BUCKLEY, RICHARD F. A

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, Index (1960-2016)

    27/1/2016

    Highlight: on the Connecticut Mint (RF-59) 591 22 The Stepney Find: Floard or Collection? The Debate Continues (G14) 2807 HIGGIE, LINCOLN W. Author of The Colonial Coinage of the U. S. Virgin Islands 330 HIGGINS, FRANK C. 112 HIGLEY, JOHN A blacksmith and copper-mine operator of Granby, Connecticut who struck and distributed private coppers dated 1737 and 1739. 8,3943 HIGLEY COPPERS See also HIGLEY, JOHN above. Bolen copy in pewter 8 HILLEGAS, MICHAEL See also FLINT, ROYAL Treasurer of the United States who held Fugio Cents for 14 months after their delivery by James Jarvis 289 HINKLEY, ROBERT I. A Small Hoard of Vermont Coppers 311 HISTOGRAMS Weight Histograms of Fugio Cents and Virginia Halfpence 1053 HISTORICAL MAGAZINE Original Manuscript of “The Earliest New York Token” for Historical Magazine

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, Index (1960-2016)

    27/1/2016

    Highlight: Hickcox’s Observations Gold Piece 255 on the Connecticut Mint 591 RF-26 Connecticut 5.3-B.2 of 1786 RF-60 Do Nelson 6 & 7 VOCE POPULI (See also RF-13) 255, 283 Actually Have Different RF-27 Danske Americansk 281, 330 Obverse Dies? 606 RF-28 Dr. Hall’s “Later Notes” on RF-61 What Happened to Connecticuts” 36, 281 Lord Baltimore? 610, 625 RF-29 Fugio 11 -A Condition RF-62 The First Collegiate Medal Question 281 in America 653, 680, 689, 693 RF-30 Unusual Surface Characteristics RF-63 Thirteen Linked Rings of of Certain Fugio “New Haven' Early American Unity 687 Dies 282 RF-31 Connecticut Coppers RF-64 Did New Jersey Coppers Officially Mint Locations 298 Circulate in 1792? 1152,1669 RF-32 “New Haven” Fugio RF-65 Maris’ New Jersey Book Puzzle 1415 “Brass Dies” 298 RF-66 Hessian Payments 1415,

    Read more

    The Colonial Newsletter, Index (1960-2016)

    27/1/2016

    Highlight: 916 Fugio Attribution Scheme (TN-1 79) 1699 Fugio Rarity Table (1963) 74 Fugio Rarity Table (1972) 326 Fugio Rarity Table (1984) 887 Fugio Rarity Table (1991) 1239 Hickcox’s [John H.] Observations on the Connecticut Mint (RF-59) 591 Lost CNL Folder , The 1504 MOS, Odd and Curious Connecticut MOS Specimens. 460-470 MOS, More Odd and Curious Connecticut MOS Specimens 515-518 New Jersey WHAT’SIT? Additional Information on. (TN-102A) Comment on. 910,918,1394 New Machin’s Mills Die Variety Vlack 24-72C (TN-1 00) Comment on. 908 New FUGIO Reverse LL (TN-55) 537 New Club Ray Fugio Variety 23-ZZ 153 Observations Regarding “On Hardening Steel Dies at the First United States Mint — The Eckfeldt Process — (G-1A) 544 Overview of Early American Coinage Technology 765,780,799,812 Privateering Interests

    Read more

    Calcoin News, vol. 19, no. 2

    1/3/1965

    Highlight: Among them were two goldsmiths and a William Buel from New Haven whose father was connected with the Connecticut mint (which discontinued operation in 1787). Buel brought with him the original dies used by his father and these resulted in Vermont’s second issue of 1787-88. It was very similar to the Connecticut coin and entirely different from the original Vermont issue. Thirty-five varieties of Vermont coins apparently were struck at the Rupert mint, and a thirty-sixth may have recently come to light. The Ben- nington Museum, with the most com- plete collection, has the thirty-five varieties and a total of ninety-eight on display. The Vermont Historical So- ciety has twenty-seven varieties in Montpelier. Private collectors in the field include General M. S. Newton of Brattleborc who has

    Read more

    Penny-Wise, Vol. 10, No. 5(56)

    15/9/1976

    Highlight: This was the only legal Connecticut mint; it ceased operations as of June 1 , 1 787 after James Jarvis (who signed New York notes dated March 5, 1 776) bought a majority interest in the firm and converted it to the ostensible purpose of manufacturing FUGIO cents; its total output of legal Connecticut coins was 1 ,407,000. Hillhouse got off lucky: his interest was bought out (except for the 1/8 part of Jarvis & Co.), so that he was not directly involved in the later Jarvis & Co. illegal manufacture of over 3 ,000,000 Connecticut coppers using federal copper originally intended for FUGIO cents. The presumption is that he absented himself from the New Haven mint and went back into politics, since in 1 789 we find him a member of the state Council, continuing through 1790, when he ran for U.S.

    Read more

    Cumulative Index to Penny-Wise, Vol. 1-20

    15/11/1984

    Highlight: lable for individual issues of 'Penny-Wise' 1 3 Birch, Robert II 52 Birch, Robert Bird, Doug XVIII 174 "Minutes of west coast EAC regional meeting" XX 152 Photo XVII! 257 "Report of west coast EAC regional meeting" XIX 87 "Report of West Coast EAC regional meeting" XIX 283 "Report of West Coast EAC regional meeting" XIX 343 "Report of West Coast EAC regional meeting" Bishop, Samuel XX 271 Connecticut mint 4

    Read more

    Cumulative Index to Penny-Wise, Vol. 1-20

    15/11/1984

    Highlight: Connecticut mint Goodridge, Carvin "New England EAC regional meeting” photo Gordon, C.F., Jr. biographical sketch letter to editor letter to editor letter to editor letter to editor letter to editor letter to editor personalia photo recommends "Swaps & Sales” report on central Alabama coin show report on Florida coin shows "Through a looking-glass" Goss, Franklin W. (Frank) “Mid- Atlantic EAC regional meeting" Photo XIV XIV XIV XIV XIV XVI XVII XX V XX XIX X X XVI XI XI XIX XV XV XVII VIII VIII VI VI IX IX XIX XX XX XVII XVIII XVIII XVIII XVII XVII XVIII XV VII XVI IX IX IX IX XVII XVIII XX XX XIX XIX XIX XVI XVII IX XVIII XVII XVII IX XVI VIII I I I I Gosting, Donald L., Jr., letter to editor Gosting, Donald, Jr., photo Goudge, James H. Letter to editor “Re: The recent controversy over

    Read more

    Penny-Wise, index to vol. 20

    15/11/1986

    Highlight: Connecticut mint 271 Cent, U,So , attribution aides Bland, Del, commended 305-06 36 -37, 276 "Corrections to the Van Cleave attribution, numbering schemes 122 sale catalogue" 105-06 of recent acquisitions 278

    Read more

    Penny-Wise, index to vol. 20

    15/11/1986

    Highlight: Connecticut mint 271 regional meeting, Lanham, MD. Goss, Frank, photo 152 February, 1986, report 81-82 Grading 81-82 April 19, 1986, announced 74 AN ACS 181-83 regional meeting. Long Beach discussion (humor) 119-21, 184 February 13, 1987, announced 317 procedure 67 June 6, 1986, report 234-35 standards (humor) 271-73 October 3, 1986 316-17 Great Chain 205-07 regional meeting, Michigan Grellman, J„ R. "Bob" November 29, 1985, report 36 "Educational Forum - EAC '86" 156-57 regional meeting, New York, "Late date cent data" Vol . II April 12, 1986, announced 75 (1849-57) announced. November 1, 1986, announced corrigenda 210 234, 314 "late date cent update" 276 regional meeting. New York-New "Late date large cent Jersey section, November 2, reference update" 176-77 1985, report 26-37 "New

    Read more

    Penny-Wise, index to vol. 20

    15/11/1986

    Highlight: Connecticut mint 271 Hudson River, barrier chain 205-07 Jefferson, Thomas promotes national mint 271 Jessen, Bob, "Tales of a digger - IV: The attack of the honey dippers, " (humor) 237-42 Johnson, B„ G. , letter to Thomas Elder (1941) 129-30 Jones, William T, , Jr. "The ANACS paper chase" 181-83 "Another interview with a numismatic investment advisor" (humor) 281-83 "A brief history of the Massachusetts silver coinage" Part IV, conclusion 7-10 "A half cent condition census for the intermediate collector: The Draped Bust half cents » Part I" 266-68 "An interview with a numismatic investment advisor" 119-21 personalia 9 photo 152 "Rarity ratings - approach with caution" 107-09 Kelly, Giff, "EAC meeting at Lancaster, Penna" 318 "My first (but not my last) EAC convention" 159-60 Klein, Mark E

    Read more

    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 16]

    /1861

    Highlight: it is very probable that the coin above described was manufactured by him at the Connecticut mint, in New-Havcn. Abel Buel, who had bceu previously associated with Mr. Jarvis, assisted him in its manufacture; he cut the dies, and, indeed, it is said that he designed the same, which is not at all improbable, judg- ing from his conceded ingenuity. The coins were stru#k at first in New- Ilavcn, but for how long a time it is not known. Mr. Buel left the • country for Europe in 1788, having, previous to his departure, given to his sou permission to coiu coppers. William Buel fled* shortly after * William Buel fled from New-Haven under the following circumstances: Having had occasion to use some aquafortis, he procured a quantity in a jug, from a drug- gist, and was returning to his residence

    Read more

    George Fuld Correspondence, File 3, 1959

    /1959

    Highlight: and I would like to write a section on the newly discovered information con- cerning the operation of the Connecticut Mint. I realize that the cost of a publication is substantial and we should know more about it before any money is raised. We should also keep our sights on distributing more copies and cutting down the price per copy as it would bo a real accomplishment to get our money back so that we would have a fund to proceed with other publications. i’he donation by each of those whom you have contacted could b© made to this society but T believe this should wait until the costs are further ascertained. Once tJiis is published on a non-profit basis it would not be republished, commercially, in my opinion. Will the pictures com© out satisfactorily? and if you have a sample of the type

    Read more
      Page 1 of 3
      NNP is 100% non-profit and independent // Your feedback is essential and welcome. // Your feedback is essential and welcome.

      Contact Us

      • NNPCurator@wustl.edu

      • c/o Washington University Libraries
        One Brookings Drive
        Campus Box 1061
        St. Louis, MO 63130

      About Us

      The Newman Numismatic Portal is located at Washington University in St. Louis and funded by the Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society. The NNP is dedicated to becoming the primary and most comprehensive resource for numismatic research and reference material, initially concentrating on U.S. Coinage and Currency. Contact us with suggestions and corrections.

      Find out more

      Copyright 2017 © EPNNES & Washington University in St. Louis