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    harsen medal

    The November 2015 Baltimore Auction, U.S. Coins

    Highlight: Miscellaneous Medals 24197 1859 Harsen Medal. Bronze Electrotype. 92.7 mm. Extremely Fine, Edge Bruise. Obv: Bust of Dr. Harsen facing left, HARSEN MEDAL above, date 1859 below, and MULLER on the truncation of the bust. Rev: Clinical study group of 10 physicians examining a patient, and inscription COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS / AND SURGEONS / NEW- YORK below. Issued beginning in 1859 for a report on clinical instruction at the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons. This was the third place award and was accompanied by a cash prize of $25.00. The surfaces are a bit “dirty” with a heavy edge bump at 8 o’clock on the obverse. From the Collections of The Strong, Rochester, New York; sold to ben- efit the museums collections fund; originally collected by John Charles Woodbury (1859-1937). 24193

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 24 - 26

    1/7/1889

    Highlight: Inscription: harsen medal, 1859. Reverse. Medical men and students (nine) at a clinical lecture (from Dr. Gurdon Buck). Exergue: college of physicians 1 and surgeons. | new-york. Upon rim, the name and rank of recipient, and the date. Dr. Alfred H. Buck, of N. Y., has sent me the original photograph from which the medal was formed, and informs me that the eleven persons there represented are, beginning at the left, Drs. Gouverneur M. Smith, , , D. B. St. John Roosa, Tuthill, G. Buck, , Robert F. Weir, Alfred North, , and Normand Smith. Bronze. 58. 90 mm. In the Government (Lee) and Fisher Collections. P'or the three best clinical reports by the students of the College at the N. Y. Hospital. For information regard- ing this medal I am indebted to Dr. John G. Curtis, Secretary. Columbia

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 15 - 18

    /1880

    Highlight: large bronze “ Harsen ” Medal, of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y., 5.10. FOREIGN .SALES. The sale in London a few weeks ago of a Roman gentleman’s collection of Renaissance medals and coins attracted large attention from connoisseurs. The gem of the lot was a medallion. 3^ inches in diameter, of Raphael Maffei, a bust of him wearing a skull cap, while on the reverse Maffei and a draped female figure are surrounded by the motto, “Sic itur ad astra” It was bought for a public London collection for $1000. A medal of Ludovico Toscano, the Milan poet and jurist, brought $85 ; one of Digitized by Google Original from CORNELL UNIVERSITY

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    The MCA Advisory, August 2009

    1/8/2009

    Highlight: One medal occasionally seen is the Harsen medal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, issued in 1859. In many, but not all cases, the filled galvanos are joined by a thick metal rim. The American Numismatic Society’s cabinet inventory lists contains several other medals by Muller, including a 72mm cast bronze uniface self portrait darted 1855. The portrait on the Hart medal appears to be heavily chased. While there is no evidence of a name ever having been present and removed, it was probably created by altering the features of a Slemmer medal. Since there is no evidence of tooling in the field, the altered portrait was likely used as a model in creating the obverse. The reverse was created specifically for this medal, and reads To / N. Coleman Hart, / who Died June 6*

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York. This medal (bronze. 92 mm., quadrangular) was founded in 1859 by Dr. Jacob Harsen (1808-1862) at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (Medical Department of Columbia University) for the three best clinical re- ports. Upon the reverse are the figures of ten medical men attending a clinical lecture by an eleventh. What are their identities? In designing the medal several successive photographs were taken, and there was evident variance ; s to whom should finally appear. Nearly thirty years ago I se- cuied the aid of several Nev/ York friends, whose views proved equally divergent as to the final decision. In the American Journal of Numismatics for January, 1891, p. 77, I described the medal and stated that as far as I could then ascertain, Dr. Guidon Buck was the

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: 1917) there was solved one of the mysteries attending the Harsen Medal of Columbia University, which for fifty-seven years had puzzled the comparatively few numismatists and physi- cians who have known of its existence. There is still another feature relat- ing to the medal to which I did not then sufficiently refer. Dr. Harsen either did or did not himself know of its general features. He either con- ceived it himself, or this was done hy friends or a personal representative, perhaps after his death. In either case, intentionally or otherwise, a joke was perpetrated that, now revealed, will forever cause amusement. That only his family name ap- pears, with no indication as to his own identity, may have been permitted or favored by him, though this is highly improbable, for the time has al

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: that concerning the identity of the artist of the Harsen medal, has been solved by Mr. Henry Chapman of Philadelphia. Mr. Chapman writes me that the Muller in question was a resident of New York, a German of independent means, who designed chiefly for his own amusement. Mr. Chapman possesses a large bronze medal of Schiller, 125 mm., which bears upon the obverse C. MULLER, and upon the reverse J. MATTHEWS, N. Y., and among other emblems some soda-water apparatus, making it in reality a greatly hypertrophied token. Now, it appears that Muller was a son-in-law of Matthews, of whom there are six other tokens, or, rather, medals, for they are sufficiently aesthetic to be classed as such. Three of them are in the Boston collection. One of them is unsigned; a second bears MULLER, F., while the

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York... Medico-Numismatic Queries No. 2 — The Dr. Alden March Medal of Albany - — Was It Every Struck? Meetings of Numismatic Societies and Clubs 29, 69. 106, 162, 210, 260,: 340, 378. 435, 472, Mehl's Numismatic Monthly Memmlnger, Christopher Gustavus (with Portrait) Mexican Gold Coins at U. S. Mint. To Strike Mexican Paper Currency, Retirement of Mexico Has New Type of Gold 20 Pesos Michigan Note With an "Indian Princess" Michigan, The First Banknotes Issued in Minor Coins Vanish From Sight in Germany Mints Coining Immense Quantities of Silver Miscellaneous Numismatic News 86, 135, 174, 219, 271, 345, 386, 439, Missouri Synod Luther Medal, The "Molys" Worse Than "Jits" Monetary Situation in Vera Cruz District Money and Values in Days of Old Mr. Herbert Bowen Presents

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 24 - 26

    1/7/1889

    Highlight: Inscription: harsen medal, 1859. Reverse. Medical men and students (nine) at a clinical lecture (from Dr. Gurdon Buck). Exergue: college of physicians 1 and surgeons. | new-york. Upon rim, the name and rank of recipient, and the date. Dr. Alfred H. Buck, of N. Y., has sent me the original photograph from which the medal was formed, and informs me that the eleven persons there represented are, beginning at the left, Drs. Gouverneur M. Smith, , , D. B. St. John Roosa, Tuthill, G. Buck, , Robert F. Weir, Alfred North, , and Normand Smith. Bronze. 58. 90 mm. In the Government (Lee) and Fisher Collections. P'or the three best clinical reports by the students of the College at the N. Y. Hospital. For information regard- ing this medal I am indebted to Dr. John G. Curtis, Secretary. Columbia

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 15 - 18

    /1880

    Highlight: large bronze “ Harsen ” Medal, of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y., 5.10. FOREIGN .SALES. The sale in London a few weeks ago of a Roman gentleman’s collection of Renaissance medals and coins attracted large attention from connoisseurs. The gem of the lot was a medallion. 3^ inches in diameter, of Raphael Maffei, a bust of him wearing a skull cap, while on the reverse Maffei and a draped female figure are surrounded by the motto, “Sic itur ad astra” It was bought for a public London collection for $1000. A medal of Ludovico Toscano, the Milan poet and jurist, brought $85 ; one of Digitized by Google Original from CORNELL UNIVERSITY

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    American Journal of Numismatics (Series One), Vols. 23 - 25

    /1888

    Highlight: Inscription: harsen medal, 1859. Reverse. Medical men and students (nine) at a clinical lecture (from Dr. Gurdon Buck). Exergue: college of physicians | and surgeons. | new-york. Upon rim, the name and rank of recipient, and the date. Dr. Alfred H. Buck, of N. Y., has sent me the original photograph from which the medal was formed, and informs me that the eleven persons there represented are, beginning at the left, Drs. Gouverneur M. Smith, , , D. B. St. John Roosa, Tuthill, G. Buck, , Robert F. Weir, Alfred North, , and Normand Smith. Bronze. 58. 90 mm. In the Government (Lee) and Fisher Collections. For the three best clinical reports by the students of the College at the N. Y. Hospital. For information regard- ing this medal I am indebted to Dr. John G. Curtis, Secretary. Columbia

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    The MCA Advisory, August 2009

    1/8/2009

    Highlight: One medal occasionally seen is the Harsen medal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, issued in 1859. In many, but not all cases, the filled galvanos are joined by a thick metal rim. The American Numismatic Society’s cabinet inventory lists contains several other medals by Muller, including a 72mm cast bronze uniface self portrait darted 1855. The portrait on the Hart medal appears to be heavily chased. While there is no evidence of a name ever having been present and removed, it was probably created by altering the features of a Slemmer medal. Since there is no evidence of tooling in the field, the altered portrait was likely used as a model in creating the obverse. The reverse was created specifically for this medal, and reads To / N. Coleman Hart, / who Died June 6*

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York. This medal (bronze. 92 mm., quadrangular) was founded in 1859 by Dr. Jacob Harsen (1808-1862) at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (Medical Department of Columbia University) for the three best clinical re- ports. Upon the reverse are the figures of ten medical men attending a clinical lecture by an eleventh. What are their identities? In designing the medal several successive photographs were taken, and there was evident variance ; s to whom should finally appear. Nearly thirty years ago I se- cuied the aid of several Nev/ York friends, whose views proved equally divergent as to the final decision. In the American Journal of Numismatics for January, 1891, p. 77, I described the medal and stated that as far as I could then ascertain, Dr. Guidon Buck was the

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: 1917) there was solved one of the mysteries attending the Harsen Medal of Columbia University, which for fifty-seven years had puzzled the comparatively few numismatists and physi- cians who have known of its existence. There is still another feature relat- ing to the medal to which I did not then sufficiently refer. Dr. Harsen either did or did not himself know of its general features. He either con- ceived it himself, or this was done hy friends or a personal representative, perhaps after his death. In either case, intentionally or otherwise, a joke was perpetrated that, now revealed, will forever cause amusement. That only his family name ap- pears, with no indication as to his own identity, may have been permitted or favored by him, though this is highly improbable, for the time has al

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: that concerning the identity of the artist of the Harsen medal, has been solved by Mr. Henry Chapman of Philadelphia. Mr. Chapman writes me that the Muller in question was a resident of New York, a German of independent means, who designed chiefly for his own amusement. Mr. Chapman possesses a large bronze medal of Schiller, 125 mm., which bears upon the obverse C. MULLER, and upon the reverse J. MATTHEWS, N. Y., and among other emblems some soda-water apparatus, making it in reality a greatly hypertrophied token. Now, it appears that Muller was a son-in-law of Matthews, of whom there are six other tokens, or, rather, medals, for they are sufficiently aesthetic to be classed as such. Three of them are in the Boston collection. One of them is unsigned; a second bears MULLER, F., while the

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York... Medico-Numismatic Queries No. 2 — The Dr. Alden March Medal of Albany - — Was It Every Struck? Meetings of Numismatic Societies and Clubs 29, 69. 106, 162, 210, 260,: 340, 378. 435, 472, Mehl's Numismatic Monthly Memmlnger, Christopher Gustavus (with Portrait) Mexican Gold Coins at U. S. Mint. To Strike Mexican Paper Currency, Retirement of Mexico Has New Type of Gold 20 Pesos Michigan Note With an "Indian Princess" Michigan, The First Banknotes Issued in Minor Coins Vanish From Sight in Germany Mints Coining Immense Quantities of Silver Miscellaneous Numismatic News 86, 135, 174, 219, 271, 345, 386, 439, Missouri Synod Luther Medal, The "Molys" Worse Than "Jits" Monetary Situation in Vera Cruz District Money and Values in Days of Old Mr. Herbert Bowen Presents

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 31 (1918)

    /1918

    Highlight: Harsen medal of New York. NUM, 1917, Jan. Hayes and Tilden. PROSKEY, D.: NUM, 1917. June. Hiidson-Fulton. ADAMS, E. H.: Hudson-Fulton medal. AJN, 1907. ADAMS, L. D.: Hudson-Fulton medal. AJN, 1909. ERNST, K.: Die Hudson-Fulton Feier in New York. Monatsbl. oest. Gesell. fur Num, 1904. HIGGINS, F. C.: The relation of this year’s Hudson-Fulton cel- ebration to numismatics, 1909. lndepen

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York. This medal (bronze. 92 mm., quadrangular) was founded in 1859 by Dr. Jacob Harsen (1808-1862) at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (Medical Department of Columbia University) for the three best clinical re- ports. Upon the reverse are the figures of ten medical men attending a clinical lecture by an eleventh. What are their identities? In designing the medal several successive photographs were taken, and there was evident variance ; s to whom should finally appear. Nearly thirty years ago I se- cuied the aid of several Nev/ York friends, whose views proved equally divergent as to the final decision. In the American Journal of Numismatics for January, 1891, p. 77, I described the medal and stated that as far as I could then ascertain, Dr. Guidon Buck was the

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: 1917) there was solved one of the mysteries attending the Harsen Medal of Columbia University, which for fifty-seven years had puzzled the comparatively few numismatists and physi- cians who have known of its existence. There is still another feature relat- ing to the medal to which I did not then sufficiently refer. Dr. Harsen either did or did not himself know of its general features. He either con- ceived it himself, or this was done hy friends or a personal representative, perhaps after his death. In either case, intentionally or otherwise, a joke was perpetrated that, now revealed, will forever cause amusement. That only his family name ap- pears, with no indication as to his own identity, may have been permitted or favored by him, though this is highly improbable, for the time has al

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: that concerning the identity of the artist of the Harsen medal, has been solved by Mr. Henry Chapman of Philadelphia. Mr. Chapman writes me that the Muller in question was a resident of New York, a German of independent means, who designed chiefly for his own amusement. Mr. Chapman possesses a large bronze medal of Schiller, 125 mm., which bears upon the obverse C. MULLER, and upon the reverse J. MATTHEWS, N. Y., and among other emblems some soda-water apparatus, making it in reality a greatly hypertrophied token. Now, it appears that Muller was a son-in-law of Matthews, of whom there are six other tokens, or, rather, medals, for they are sufficiently aesthetic to be classed as such. Three of them are in the Boston collection. One of them is unsigned; a second bears MULLER, F., while the

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York... Medico-Numismatic Queries No. 2 — The Dr. Alden March Medal of Albany - — Was It Every Struck? Meetings of Numismatic Societies and Clubs 29, 69. 106, 162, 210, 260,: 340, 378. 435, 472, Mehl's Numismatic Monthly Memmlnger, Christopher Gustavus (with Portrait) Mexican Gold Coins at U. S. Mint. To Strike Mexican Paper Currency, Retirement of Mexico Has New Type of Gold 20 Pesos Michigan Note With an "Indian Princess" Michigan, The First Banknotes Issued in Minor Coins Vanish From Sight in Germany Mints Coining Immense Quantities of Silver Miscellaneous Numismatic News 86, 135, 174, 219, 271, 345, 386, 439, Missouri Synod Luther Medal, The "Molys" Worse Than "Jits" Monetary Situation in Vera Cruz District Money and Values in Days of Old Mr. Herbert Bowen Presents

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 31 (1918)

    /1918

    Highlight: Harsen medal of New York. NUM, 1917, Jan. Hayes and Tilden. PROSKEY, D.: NUM, 1917. June. Hiidson-Fulton. ADAMS, E. H.: Hudson-Fulton medal. AJN, 1907. ADAMS, L. D.: Hudson-Fulton medal. AJN, 1909. ERNST, K.: Die Hudson-Fulton Feier in New York. Monatsbl. oest. Gesell. fur Num, 1904. HIGGINS, F. C.: The relation of this year’s Hudson-Fulton cel- ebration to numismatics, 1909. lndepen

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York. This medal (bronze. 92 mm., quadrangular) was founded in 1859 by Dr. Jacob Harsen (1808-1862) at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (Medical Department of Columbia University) for the three best clinical re- ports. Upon the reverse are the figures of ten medical men attending a clinical lecture by an eleventh. What are their identities? In designing the medal several successive photographs were taken, and there was evident variance ; s to whom should finally appear. Nearly thirty years ago I se- cuied the aid of several Nev/ York friends, whose views proved equally divergent as to the final decision. In the American Journal of Numismatics for January, 1891, p. 77, I described the medal and stated that as far as I could then ascertain, Dr. Guidon Buck was the

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: 1917) there was solved one of the mysteries attending the Harsen Medal of Columbia University, which for fifty-seven years had puzzled the comparatively few numismatists and physi- cians who have known of its existence. There is still another feature relat- ing to the medal to which I did not then sufficiently refer. Dr. Harsen either did or did not himself know of its general features. He either con- ceived it himself, or this was done hy friends or a personal representative, perhaps after his death. In either case, intentionally or otherwise, a joke was perpetrated that, now revealed, will forever cause amusement. That only his family name ap- pears, with no indication as to his own identity, may have been permitted or favored by him, though this is highly improbable, for the time has al

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: that concerning the identity of the artist of the Harsen medal, has been solved by Mr. Henry Chapman of Philadelphia. Mr. Chapman writes me that the Muller in question was a resident of New York, a German of independent means, who designed chiefly for his own amusement. Mr. Chapman possesses a large bronze medal of Schiller, 125 mm., which bears upon the obverse C. MULLER, and upon the reverse J. MATTHEWS, N. Y., and among other emblems some soda-water apparatus, making it in reality a greatly hypertrophied token. Now, it appears that Muller was a son-in-law of Matthews, of whom there are six other tokens, or, rather, medals, for they are sufficiently aesthetic to be classed as such. Three of them are in the Boston collection. One of them is unsigned; a second bears MULLER, F., while the

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 30 (1917)

    /1917

    Highlight: Harsen Medal of New York... Medico-Numismatic Queries No. 2 — The Dr. Alden March Medal of Albany - — Was It Every Struck? Meetings of Numismatic Societies and Clubs 29, 69. 106, 162, 210, 260,: 340, 378. 435, 472, Mehl's Numismatic Monthly Memmlnger, Christopher Gustavus (with Portrait) Mexican Gold Coins at U. S. Mint. To Strike Mexican Paper Currency, Retirement of Mexico Has New Type of Gold 20 Pesos Michigan Note With an "Indian Princess" Michigan, The First Banknotes Issued in Minor Coins Vanish From Sight in Germany Mints Coining Immense Quantities of Silver Miscellaneous Numismatic News 86, 135, 174, 219, 271, 345, 386, 439, Missouri Synod Luther Medal, The "Molys" Worse Than "Jits" Monetary Situation in Vera Cruz District Money and Values in Days of Old Mr. Herbert Bowen Presents

    Read more

    The Numismatist, Vol. 31 (1918)

    /1918

    Highlight: Harsen medal of New York. NUM, 1917, Jan. Hayes and Tilden. PROSKEY, D.: NUM, 1917. June. Hiidson-Fulton. ADAMS, E. H.: Hudson-Fulton medal. AJN, 1907. ADAMS, L. D.: Hudson-Fulton medal. AJN, 1909. ERNST, K.: Die Hudson-Fulton Feier in New York. Monatsbl. oest. Gesell. fur Num, 1904. HIGGINS, F. C.: The relation of this year’s Hudson-Fulton cel- ebration to numismatics, 1909. lndepen

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    Dan Hansen Collection of Official Presidential Inaugural Medals

    Highlight: HARSEN MEDAL above and the date 1859 below the truncation of the bust. On the reverse a physician is shown conducting bedside rounds in a composition, apparently based upon a photographic image, which leaves little doubt as to the proper relationship between preceptor, junior colleagues and patient in a charity ward on the eve of the Civil War. Inscribed in the exergue is: COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS/ AND SURGEONS. / NEW- YORK. ★ no

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    Auction 74

    Highlight: HARSEN MEDAL above and the date 1 859 below the truncation of the bust. On the reverse a physician is shown conducting bedside rounds in a composition, apparently based upon a photo- graphic image, which leaves little doubt as to the proper rela- tionship between preceptor, junior colleagues and patient in a charity ward on the eve of the Civil War. Inscribed in the exergue is: COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS/ AND SUR- GEONS./ NEW- YORK. Awarded specimens of this medal are known with award inscription on the edge. Specimens, awarded or not, are quite rare as the medal was awarded for only a very few years. This is the only the second example we have seen. The first, in similar condition, we sold in our 2002 Hansen Sale for ★ 128

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    A small collection of valuable and rare Greek silver coin ... [03/24/1882]

    Highlight: Harsen Medal. By Muller. His head and bust. Rev., Ten doctors around a bed, on which is a patient; below, “College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.” This is a 2d prize medal, and given as such in 1866. Extremely fine condition and desirable. In a reversable case. 60 Dr. Baron Decan us. Head and bust. Rev., Urbi et orbi salus. Coat arms, sun, storks, &c. Facult. Medic. Paris, 1754. Very fine. 18 Lafayette, G al - en Chef. Head left. About the same head as the Voltaire medal. Rev., Defenseur, etc. Proof. 14 Head and bust of Garfield (gilt) in a circle upon a square plaque or ground of plastic brown wood; also one of Arthur. Very fine. 2 pieces. 4|x4| in. Same in all respects of Hancock and English 2 pieces Ancient penance belt from a Tyrolese convent, used about the 15th century by monk

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    Catalogue of large and important collections of rare coins, medals, tokens, paper money, weapons, gems, Indian relics, stamps, etc. [07/01/1915]

    Highlight: Harsen Medal. Large head to left, 1859, by Muller. Rev. Operating scene, College of Surgeons, N. Y. Bronzed electrotype. Size 90. A huge medal, one of the largest ever issued. Various large electrotype, Presidential, etc. 10 pcs. N. Y. Crystal Palace, Jenny Lind, etc., mostly Electrotypes. Fine 10 pcs. Washington (9) Libertas Americana, Paul Jones, Wm. Penn., Frank- lin, etc. All electrotypes. Fine. 15 pcs. Electrotypes of a large variety of American medals, large and small. 42 pcs. /' 5 * / tig 1187 Henry Clay.

    Auction catalog from American Numismatic Society library.

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    Presidential Coin and Antique Company Sale #86

    Highlight: HARSEN MEDAL above and the date 1859 below the truncation of the bust. On the reverse a physician is shown conducting bedside rounds in a composition, apparently based upon a photographic image, which leaves little doubt as to the proper relationship between preceptor, junior colleagues and patient in a charity ward on the eve of the Civil War. Inscribed in the exergue is: COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS/ AND SURGEONS./ NEW- YORK. Dr. Walker graduated from medical school in 1891. His third placed prize was for “Proficiency at Examination.” This is the first awarded specimen we have offered. We have previously sold unawarded used examples for $356.00 and $488.00 respectively. Lot 386 (reduced) 386. PORTRAIT RELIEF OF RALPH WALDO EMERSON, 1892. 7” Cast Bronze. Ralph Bartlett Goddard, Sc. Sc. Uniface.

    Sale #86 of tokens, medals, and exonumia of this longstanding auction firm.

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    Catalogue of American coins and medals in silver and copper, including a large number of dollars, half-dollars, 1794 cents, etc., etc. [08/03/1882]

    Highlight: 1859 Harsen Medal. Bust in high relief to left. Rev., Ten physicians grouped about a patient, college of physicians AND SURGEONS, NEW YORK. Edge inscribed 2nd prize l. h. f. daguiar ,jr. a. h. Massive bronze medal by Miiller in velvet lined morocco case. 59. Bust of William II. Seward; fine, rubber. 41 in. Set of wooden Centen. medals in pasteboard frame. 6 pcs. Cyrus W. Field. Bust to right. Rev., 44 Presented, ’’ etc. ; fine bronze proof medal. 32. Duplicate; white metal, proof. Duplicates; bronze and W. M. proof. 2 pcs. Franklin and Montyon ; busts jugata. Rev., Inscription with a wreath. Bronze; fine. 26. Presidential scries with residence on rev. Washington to Tyler, Nos. I— 10, complete. White metal; very line or proof. 22. 10 pcs.

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