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    TAMS Journal, Vol. 44, No. 2

    1/4/2004

    Highlight: Silver coins were first issued in 1894 in British Honduras. But the Indian loggers were Spanish speakers rather than English speakers and probably more accustomed to the longstanding real / dollar values of Central America than the relatively new British Honduras coinage. Certainly the Indians were not recognizing state borders and would readily cross to and from British Honduras. Inquiries made by the writer in Belize City in 1977 resulted in elderly, one-time loggers recalling they were given advances of wages in the form of cardboard tickets, which were for spending in the commissariat store in the logging camp. Another source in Belize, in 1978, advised the writer that the loggers were "paid" with books of coupons, which could be spent in the camp store. A manager of the Belize Estate

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    TAMS Journal, Vol. 44, No. 2

    1/4/2004

    Highlight: Silver coins were first issued in 1894 in British Honduras. But the Indian loggers were Spanish speakers rather than English speakers and probably more accustomed to the longstanding real / dollar values of Central America than the relatively new British Honduras coinage. Certainly the Indians were not recognizing state borders and would readily cross to and from British Honduras. Inquiries made by the writer in Belize City in 1977 resulted in elderly, one-time loggers recalling they were given advances of wages in the form of cardboard tickets, which were for spending in the commissariat store in the logging camp. Another source in Belize, in 1978, advised the writer that the loggers were "paid" with books of coupons, which could be spent in the camp store. A manager of the Belize Estate

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1912

    Highlight: MAURICE LOW WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT FOR "HARPER'S WEEKLY" JEN Congress reassembles next month one of the important matters to demand the attention of the Sen- ate will be the disposition of the loan conventions between the United States and Honduras and the United States and Nicaragua, which have been pending for almost two years. Both treaties were debated last session and allowed to go over without final action be- cause of the opposition they aroused. At the coming session, it is expected, an attempt will be made either to secure their ratification or to defeat them, as both Central-American republics are compelled to reorganize their finances, and unless they can be financed through American bankers, whose action depends upon the support given them by their government, the republics

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    The January 2017 NYINC Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: Paper Damage $200-$300 BRITISH HONDURAS 4065 Government of British Honduras. 1 Dollar, 1953-58. P-28a. Another uncirculated example of this Queen Elizabeth II design, although this one has mentioned pinholes by PMG in the comments section. PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 $500-$750 4066 Government of British Honduras. 1 Dollar, 1970-73. P-28c. A bright, original, well centered Queen Elizabeth II 1 Dollar design from British Honduras. Detailed lathe work seen on the reverse. PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 EPQ $200-$300 4067 Government of British Honduras. 2 Dollars, 1960-65. P-29b. The note is technically remarkable with picture perfect centering and margins, deep purple and orange color, and stunningly embossed. A piece that will certainly catch the eye of collectors seeking only the finest of

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    Worldwide selections of choice and rare coins, medals, paper money ... [07/18/1975]

    Highlight: of gold is now legal in the U.S.) Honduras.... of all the gold coins issued in Central America, we know least about those struck in Honduras of rare coins of the United States, what comes to mind? The 1894-S Dime of which only 24 were struck? Or perhaps the 1804 Dollar of which some 15 specimens are known? Or how about the five 1913 Liberty Head nickels? Ladies and Gentlemen, recently discovered official governments reports, show the mintage figures of some of Honduras' gold coinage to be less than the United

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    Mail bid auction : worldwide coinage ... [02/28/1983]

    Highlight: VF 30-50.00 *003 - ARGENTINA (OR HONDURAS) Unlisted unusual 1/2 Real which may have been struck at the Mendoza mint for use in Central America or for use in Argentina. However, inasmuch as this collection came from the Central America region, we feel that the original owners classification as Honduras is very possible, this coin varies in several dimensions with our lot #931 of the November 30th, 1981 auction (Honduras23) and also from the Mendoza mint 1/2 real and instead of the rampant lions in the obverse, there appears a plain cross encircled and dotted. The reverse differs considerably from the Hondurasoza piece inasmuch as the date appears as only a large 24 instead of the full date. Our Honduras lot #931 of the November auction sold for

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    Harper's Weekly

    1/7/1891

    Highlight: the HONDURAS EXPEDITION. The hope is strongly renewed among ar- chaeologists that the long-desired solution of the mystery of ancient life in Honduras investigators of the subject in this generation have gradually reached the due estimate of the difficulties of the task, which appears equal in gravity to that achieved with the discovery of the key to the Egyptian literature. No one ventures to assert in these days whether the Spanish appellation signifying “depths” (Honduras), given to that interest- ing portion of the earth when the discovery by Columbus was completed with his

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    Mail auction sale featuring selections from the collection of C. Elliot Knoke, J. Roy Pennell, George W. Wait, John M. Willem plus other numismatic properties. [10/31/1975]

    Highlight: (35.00-50.00) BRITISH HONDURAS - PAPER MONEY GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH HONDURAS. 1 Dollar. March 1, 1956. Eliz II portrait. Serial No. G/3-212527. Pick 11. Crisp UNC. (17.50-25.00) GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH HONDURAS. 1 Dollar. Nov 1, 1961. Eliz II portrait. Serial No. G/3 581248. Pick 11-date not listed. Crisp Abt UNC. (17.50- 25.00) GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH HONDURAS. 1 Dollar. June 1, 1970. Eliz II portrait. Serial No. G/5-743068. Pick 11-date not listed. Crisp Ex Fine-Abt UNC, slight wrinkles. (15.00-20.00) GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH HONDURASMarch 1, 1956. Eliz II portrait. Serial No. H/l-052904. Pick 12-date not listed. Crisp UNC. (20.00- 30.00) GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH HONDURAS. 2 Dollars. Nov 1, 1961. Eliz II portrait. Serial No. H/l-214890. Pick 12. Crisp Abt UNC. (20.00-30.00) GOVERNMENT

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals : in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa. [1914]

    /1914

    Highlight: HONDURAS. The unit of coinage in Honduras is the Peso, and since 1871 it has been a Peso on the decimal system of 100 Centavos. The types of the coins are the national arms, the traditional tree, or a standing figure of Liberty. The small coinage of the country has sometimes been executed at foreign mints, as were the nickel pieces of 1870. The arms of Honduras. Adaptation of the national coat of arms appears on the coins of Honduras Liberty Pole with Phrygian cap in a glory, between two towers on which rest the ends of a rainbow, the whole in a triangular field azure; around, on a broad band, REPUBLICA DE HONDURAS. THE REPUBLIC OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 1. AR. Peseta, 1831. Obo. REPUBLICA DEL CENTRO DE AMERICA. Sun rising

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    NI Bulletin

    1/5/2009

    Highlight: Francisco Morazan of Honduras Howard Ford, NI #LM90 Francisco Morazan (pronounced "Mo-rah-thahn"), of Honduras, was Carrera's major opponent in the war to determine the future of Central America. The modern boundaries between Central American countries had no relevance at this time. Armies moved back and forth from Guatemala into Honduraszan figures importantly in the history of each country. Morazan first became significant in history when Mexico, under Augustin Iturbide, tried to annex Central America. Morazan and many others opposed Mexico's ambitions, and Hondurasleground in the resulting conflict. Mexico's ambitions were thwarted. Morazan eventually became President of Honduras, from 1827 to 1830, also servin

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals : in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa. [1914]

    /1914

    Highlight: HONDURAS. The unit of coinage in Honduras is the Peso, and since 1871 it has been a Peso on the decimal system of 100 Centavos. The types of the coins are the national arms, the traditional tree, or a standing figure of Liberty. The small coinage of the country has sometimes been executed at foreign mints, as were the nickel pieces of 1870. The arms of Honduras. Adaptation of the national coat of arms appears on the coins of Honduras Liberty Pole with Phrygian cap in a glory, between two towers on which rest the ends of a rainbow, the whole in a triangular field azure; around, on a broad band, REPUBLICA DE HONDURAS. THE REPUBLIC OF CENTRAL AMERICA. 1. AR. Peseta, 1831. Obo. REPUBLICA DEL CENTRO DE AMERICA. Sun rising

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    NI Bulletin

    1/5/2009

    Highlight: Francisco Morazan of Honduras Howard Ford, NI #LM90 Francisco Morazan (pronounced "Mo-rah-thahn"), of Honduras, was Carrera's major opponent in the war to determine the future of Central America. The modern boundaries between Central American countries had no relevance at this time. Armies moved back and forth from Guatemala into Honduraszan figures importantly in the history of each country. Morazan first became significant in history when Mexico, under Augustin Iturbide, tried to annex Central America. Morazan and many others opposed Mexico's ambitions, and Hondurasleground in the resulting conflict. Mexico's ambitions were thwarted. Morazan eventually became President of Honduras, from 1827 to 1830, also servin

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    The Numismatist, August 1967

    1/8/1967

    Highlight: coast of Spanish Honduras. It is at this time (ca. 1818) Pridmore (14) suggests Spanish colonial 8 reales coins were counterstamped with a crowned “GR” for special use in British Hondurase (Pridmore’s Type III), then it is much more logical to assume that it was done on occas- ion by the British political officers assigned as advisors to the Kingdom of Mosquitia whose Waika Indians enjoyed at that time the official status of a Protectorate of Great Britain. On the other hand, British Honduras re- mained an

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    Public auction sale : the splendid collection of U. S. cents formed by the late Charles F. Dunston ... also collections of Messers. Huff, Mitchell and others. [01/16/1931]

    Highlight: Honduras. Pattern. 10 Ps Tree, arms. Proof. Rare, with milled edge. 602 1878. Nicaragua. Pattern Centavo, nickel 1 903, Costa Rica. Rare 2c, V. small nickel 18 69. Honduras 1 Real nickel; same % R 1S70. Paraguay 2c VF. 5. 603 Honduras Y. sm. 1 c 18S6, x / 2 C 1880 lc wth head, 2, 4 and 8 Ps. Last 3 large coins, avg. Fine. Rare. 6. 604 French Rep. Year 5. 5 C. Head liberty. Mint state. 605 Porto Rico Large token E. Franchesci; Honduras RR. Real, Peru 5 0c de Sol Billete, 1888, Brit. Honduras lc (last proof). VF. 4. 605a 18 7 7. Honduras. Two rare patterns. Tree Republica de Honduras, Zelaya 10 and 25c Brass, VF. 2. 606 1891. Argentina 2 C. Head. Unc, red, Honduras Cent. Red. 2. 607 Old Eighteen Shilling. Money weight 1891. Eorneo y 2 and lc F. Red & proof. 3. 60S (1505-1534 ). Ferrara. Rare

    Auction catalog from American Numismatic Society library.

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    Mailbid auction. No. 4 : the Martin Valdez collection of potosi, lima and other Spanish American mints ... [09/10/1968]

    Highlight: Honduras. lO'c 1936. Lot of 20 Average Good (Only 30,000 issued). ($17.50-25.) Brit. Honduras. 10c 1944. Geo. VI. Only 30,000 issued. Lot of 20. Average G.-V. G. ($20.-27.50) Brit. Honduras. 25c 1894. Lot of 15. Average Abt. Good. ($16.50-22.50) Brit. Honduras. 25c 1895. Lot of 15. Average Abt. Good. ($17.50-25.) Brit. Honduras. 25c 1897. Lot of 20. Average Abt. Good. ($20.-27.50) Brit. Honduras. 25c 1906. Lot of 12. Average G.-V. G. ($20.-27.50) Brit. Honduras. 25c 1907. Lot of 20. Average G.-V. G. • ($22.50-30.) Brit. Honduras. 25c 1919. Lot of 20. Scarce. Average G.-V. G. ($27.50-35.) Guatemala. Ferd. VII. 4 Reales 1821-M. Some adjustment marks on neck. Fine+. ($50.-60'.) Guatemala. Real 1837. Sun and Mountains/ceiba tree. Scarce in such choice condition. Unc. ($10.-13.50) Guatemala.

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    The Saint Ludovico and Firth of Clyde Collections

    Highlight: (2,750-3,250) BRITISH HONDURAS 459 Government of British Honduraserprint. Arms left, portrait of Elizabeth II right. Ornate multicolor lathework on the verso with title at center. Perforated SPECIMEN across center. Bold red tinting is quite striking. Back right edge glue residue and some edge wrinkling there. Notation, 'for colour' on top face edge. (550-650) Colorful 1952-1953 $10 Olive Color Specimen Government of British Honduras. Ten Dollars. 1952-3 Issue. Pick 31s. Specimen. Uncirculated. No plate letter or imprint. Printed in black over multicolor underprint. Arms left, portrait of Elizabeth II right. Ornate multicolor lathework on the verso with

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    LYN KNIGHT JUNE 2016 AUCTION SALE HIGHLIGHTS

    06/12/2016

    Highlight: Honduras, Hungary, India, Iran, Russia, Scotland, Spain, and Venezuela. Hondurass made at lynknight.com. The auction schedule is as follows:

    Memphis Knight Live auction schedule

    • Session 1 Tuesday, June 14 at 10 AM (Central Time) World Notes: Afghanistan thru Denmark
    • Session 2 Tuesday, June 14 at 5 PM (Central Time) World Notes: Djibouti thru Honduras
    • Session 3 Wednesday, June 15 at 10 AM (Central Time) World Notes: Hungary thru Philippines
    • Session 4 Wednesday, June 15 at 5 PM (Central Time) World Notes: Portugal thru Miscellaneous Countries

      Joel Shafer of Lyn Knight Currency Auctions forwarded this set of highlights f

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa [1912]

    /1912

    Highlight: HONDURAS. The unit of coinage in Honduras is the Peso, and since 1871 it has been a Peso on the decimal system of 100 Centavos. The types of the coins are the national arms, the traditional tree, or a standmg figure of Liberty. The small coinage of the country has sometimes been executed at foreign mints, as were the nickel pieces of 1870. The arms of Honduras. — Adaptation of the national coat of arms appears on the coins of Honduras Liberty Pole with Phrygian cap in a glory, between two towers on which rest the ends of a rainbow, the whole in a triangular field aznre; around, on a broad band, REPUBLICA DE HONDURAS. THE EEPTTBUC OF CENTBAL AMERICA. 1. AE. Peseta, 1831. Ohv. REPUBLICA DEL CENTRO DE AMERICA. Sun rising

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    Catalogue of coins, tokens, and medals in the numismatic collection of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia, Pa [1912]

    /1912

    Highlight: HONDURAS. The unit of coinage in Honduras is the Peso, and since 1871 it has been a Peso on the decimal system of 100 Centavos. The types of the coins are the national arms, the traditional tree, or a standmg figure of Liberty. The small coinage of the country has sometimes been executed at foreign mints, as were the nickel pieces of 1870. The arms of Honduras. — Adaptation of the national coat of arms appears on the coins of Honduras Liberty Pole with Phrygian cap in a glory, between two towers on which rest the ends of a rainbow, the whole in a triangular field aznre; around, on a broad band, REPUBLICA DE HONDURAS. THE EEPTTBUC OF CENTBAL AMERICA. 1. AE. Peseta, 1831. Ohv. REPUBLICA DEL CENTRO DE AMERICA. Sun rising

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 82]

    /1911

    Highlight: THE MONETARY SYSTEM OF HONDURAS By Samuel MacClintock, Ph.D., Recently American Consul, Honduras. T he important part which the money of a country plays in connection with its commercial and financial development, due to the fact that money serves not only as a medium of exchange, but also as a imERICAV LEGATION BITILDINO — BANK BELOW — IN TEGUCIGALPA, HONDURAS standard of value and a measure of de- ferred payments, is so well known that an account of the monetary system prevailing in Honduras to-day may throw some light upon the industrial and commercial condi- tions found there. Honduras and Salvador are on a silver basis, while Nicaragua and Guatemala have a mixed silver-paper currency. As their paper is not convertible, in practice, the result is that they have no silver, except

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    The Numismatist, August 1967

    1/8/1967

    Highlight: British Honduras, ca. 1894. Evidently the canny Mr. Hunter was unaware of another proclamation made by the Queen in 1871 stating that the only gold coins legally accept- able in payment for public debt were those of the Australian mint at Sydney (7). Before coinage was finally stabi- lized by striking a standard set of coins specifically for British Hondurase described as chaotic. Another proclamation by the Queen in September 15, 1887, clear- ly indicated that it was the Guatemalan “dollar” (peso) and not the United States dollar that was the basis for the new British Honduras cents that were first struck two years earlier. Part of this proclamation consists of a long list of coins equivalent to the Guatemalan peso. For example, it shows the Golom- bian peso

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    The Philadelphia Americana Sales

    Highlight: 854 British Honduras. ND (1810-1818). Six shilling, one pen- ny. Crowned cursive GR on 1810 Mexico City 8 reales. KM 1.2. Host coin Fine. Deeply struck countermark on an exceptionally nice and clean host. Pleasant deep gray toning. Consignor comments and research notes: Possible Jamai- ca issue (although this is disputed by some). 855 British Hondurasogram on 1818 Mexico City 8 reales. KM. 2. Host coin Choice VF, or perhaps a little finer for the issue. Lightly cleaned, but attractive. A nicely centered mark. Consignor comments and research notes: Perhaps Brit- ish Honduras (according to Pridmore, who felt they were stamped by the Merchants of the Commissariat of Brit- ish Honduras). Brunk is not convinced of this, saying

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    The August 2016 ANA Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: Stack’s Bowers Galleries • The August 2016 ANA Auction BRITISH HONDURAS 31146 Government of British Honduras. 1 Dollar, 1961-69. P-28b. 1969 date. Queen at right. Red serial numbers. Textbook 64 margins. PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 EPQ $400-$600 31147 Government of British Honduras. 1 Dollar, 1961. P-28b. Pack fresh with lovely embossed inks. PCGS Very Choice New 64 PPQ $100-$200 31148 Government of British Honduras. 2 Dollars, 1960-65. P-29b. Pack fresh with nice centering. We are not sure why a Gem grade was not applied. PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 EPQ $200-$300 31149 Government of British Honduras. 2 Dollars, 1971- 73. P-29c. Well centered Two Dollar British Honduras note with bold ink and crisp problem-free paper. PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ $400-$500 31153 Treasury Department. 5000 Leva

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    The January 2017 NYINC Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: Fine $500-$1000 BRITISH HONDURAS 1043 Government of British Honduras. 1 Dollar, 1939-42. P-20. Nice centering seen on this popular 1 Dollar issue. Deep cool tones seen in the color way of this BWC design. A few folds prevent a higher grade, but the note is still a great example for the type. PMG Choice Very Fine 35 $600-$ 1000 1044 Government of British Honduras. 1 Dollar, 1939-42. P-20. A scarce early issue 1 Dollar note from British Honduras. King George seen at right. A Block. Normal wear and tear for the grade with no major netting defects. PMG Choice Fine 15 $600-$1000 1045 Government of British Honduras. 2 Dollars, 1939-42. P-2 lets. Color Trial Specimen. Well centered note seen with an array of vibrant colors and bold inks. Red BWC specimen seal at the bottom right. Red overprints i

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    Mail bid auction : worldwide selection of rare and popular numismatic material including the Peter W. Broeker collection ... [05/20/1977]

    Highlight: the fact that British Honduras had adopted on July 15th, 1887 , the Guatemalan Peso as the standard currency of British Honduras, interdicting thereby the circulation of any British money in that colony. While British Honduras' economy today is quite stagnant, if it can be said to exist at all, in those days British Honduras was a properous British colony exporting to the world hardwoods, primarily mahogany. The adoption of Guatemalan coinage in British Honduras of course caused great amounts of Guatemalan coinage to disappear into British Honduras. But not only was Guatemalan coinage current in British Honduras, it was also recognized as an extra official currency in almost all other Central American Republics. It is perhaps appropriate to note here that Argentina between 1850 and 1890

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    Numismatic commentary : plus mail auction sale ... [04/14/1972]

    Highlight: plus a VF BR HONDURAS 10 Cents 1943. Two pieces. 689 BR HONDURAS One Cent 1914. A decent Fine. 690 BR HONDURAS One Cent 1950. UNC. 691 BR HONDURAS Five Cents 1894. Fine+. 692 BR HONDURAS Five Cents 1945. Abt EF. 693 BR HONDURAS Ten Cents 1894. Fine. 694 BR HONDURAS 25 Cents 1906. VG-Fine. 695 BR NORTH BORNEO Half Cent 1891-H. UNC. 696 BR WEST AFRICA Shilling 1922-KN. Fine. 697 BR WEST AFRICA Shilling 1951-H. VF+. 698 BR WEST AFRICA Two Shillings 1938 KN. EF. 699 BR WEST AFRICA Two Shillings 1949-KN. EF 19

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30 1911

    30/6/1911

    Highlight: The following smaller foreign coins circulate at face value in Honduras: The 25- cent and 12^-cent pieces of Guatemala and the 20-cent and 10-cent pieces of Nica- ragua. Coining Money in Honduras. By Consul Arminius T. Haeberle, Tegucigalpa. [Taken from Daily Consular and Trade Reports, Oct. 8, 1910.] On February 16, 1910, the mint of Honduras was opened after having been closed two years, owing to the fact that most of the silver in bars is exported to other countries. At present (August, 1910) the Government is coining some silver, but chiefly copper coins, to replace the amount which disappeared from circulation. According to information received, copper was formerly bought at 1.50 pesos per pound (about 55 cents gold), while 1 $ pesos worth of copper coins weighed 1 pound 6 ounces. In

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30 1912

    30/6/1912

    Highlight: in Honduras 7,944 ounces of gold and 1,433,123 ounces of silver. He does not give the fineness of these ounces but states that this was not the total production. This is -the production of the New York & Honduras Rosario Mining Co., and the only statistics available. This is the only mine workmg on a large scale. The United States imported from Hondurasat $632,577, which repre- sents 1,171,439 fine ounces. [By Consul Arminius T. Haeberle, Tegucigalpa, from Daily Consular and Trade Reports, Nov. 14, 1912.] " The most noteworthy accomplishment in the mining history of Honduras during 1911 was the erection of the new works of the New York & Honduras Rosari

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1911

    30/6/1911

    Highlight: The following smaller foreign coins circulate at face value in Honduras: The 25- cent and 12J-cent pieces of Guatemala and the 20-cent and 10-cent pieces of Nica- ragua. Coining Money in Honduras. By Consul Arminlus T. Haeberle, Tegucigalpa. [Taken from Dally Consular and Trade Reports, Oct. 8, 1910.] On Februa^ 16, 1910, the mint of Honduras was opened after having been closed two years, owing to the fact that most of the silver in bars is exported to other countries. At present (August, 1910) the Government is coining some silver, but chiefly copper coins, to replace the amount which disappeared from circulation. According to information received, copper was formerly bought at 1.50 pesos per pound (about 56 cents gold), while 1 J pesos worth of copper coins weighed 1 pound 6 ounces. In

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    Mehl's Numismatic Monthly (vol. 8)

    1/1/1917

    Highlight: HONDURAS REDUCING THE FINENESS OF ITS COINS The Government of Honduras, it is reported, has decided that the problem arising from the shortage of silver coin can be met, at least in part, by issuing a coinage about 50 per cent fine, and it is announed semi-officially that the national mint, long closed, will be re-opened for the re-minting of about 250.000 pesos, which will make 500,000 pesos of the new silver currency. The Hondurasth for the silver it contains about 75 cents or even more in the United States, and which also contained a small quantity of gold, has long been quoted around 44 cents (gold) in Honduras. Despite laws enacted to discourage its exportation, so much of this silver currency has been shipped out of the country because of the profit to be mad

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    U.S. Mint Report (1923)

    1/1/1923

    Highlight: The Government of Honduras does not issue paper currency. Two domestic banks, the Banco de Honduras and the Banco Atlantida, are banks of issue. The former is required by its concession to maintain 40 per cent of its paper circulation amount in native silver as a reserve; the latter maintains as a reserve 50 per cent of its paper circulation in American currency of any description. The Bank of Hon- duras is requited to redeem up to its full paper issue in silver on demand. All paper issue of the Banco Atlantida bears a statement that it will be redeemed upon demand at 50 per cent of its value (the legal ratio) in American paper or metal currency. On January 24, 1919, the Government decreed American paper and metal currency to be legal tender with a comparative value of 200 per cent of the

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 89]

    /1914

    Highlight: the Banco de Hondurasrculation, and only a few thousand pesos in copper coins of one or two centavos. It is probably not far off the mark to say that the active circulation of silver pesos and fractional silver money is about 1,250,000 pesos. This is made up of silver coinage of all Central and South American countries, those of Chile, Peru and Guatemala predomi- nating. There is only a small amount of Honduras pesos, owing to the fact that the Honduras peso, being coined from native

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30 1911

    30/6/1911

    Highlight: The following smaller foreign coins circulate at face value in Honduras: The 25- cent and 12^-cent pieces of Guatemala and the 20-cent and 10-cent pieces of Nica- ragua. Coining Money in Honduras. By Consul Arminius T. Haeberle, Tegucigalpa. [Taken from Daily Consular and Trade Reports, Oct. 8, 1910.] On February 16, 1910, the mint of Honduras was opened after having been closed two years, owing to the fact that most of the silver in bars is exported to other countries. At present (August, 1910) the Government is coining some silver, but chiefly copper coins, to replace the amount which disappeared from circulation. According to information received, copper was formerly bought at 1.50 pesos per pound (about 55 cents gold), while 1 $ pesos worth of copper coins weighed 1 pound 6 ounces. In

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30 1912

    30/6/1912

    Highlight: in Honduras 7,944 ounces of gold and 1,433,123 ounces of silver. He does not give the fineness of these ounces but states that this was not the total production. This is -the production of the New York & Honduras Rosario Mining Co., and the only statistics available. This is the only mine workmg on a large scale. The United States imported from Hondurasat $632,577, which repre- sents 1,171,439 fine ounces. [By Consul Arminius T. Haeberle, Tegucigalpa, from Daily Consular and Trade Reports, Nov. 14, 1912.] " The most noteworthy accomplishment in the mining history of Honduras during 1911 was the erection of the new works of the New York & Honduras Rosari

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 31 (1918)

    /1918

    Highlight: HONDURAS. — Consul F. J. Dyer, of Tegucigalpa, reports to the Depart- ment of Commerce that the Government of Hondurascided that the problem arising from the shortage of silver coin can be met. at least in part, by issuing a coinage about 50 per cent, fine, and it is announced semi- officially that the national mint, long closed, will be reopened for the remint- ing of about 250.000 pesos, which will make 500,000 pesos of the new silver currency. The Hondurasthe silver it con- tains about 75 cents or even more in New York, and which also contained a small quantity of gold, has long been quoted around 44 cents (gold) in Honduras. Despite laws enacted to discourage its exportation, so much of this silver currency has been shipped out of the country

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    Mehl's Numismatic Monthly (vol. 8)

    1/1/1917

    Highlight: HONDURAS REDUCING THE FINENESS OF ITS COINS The Government of Honduras, it is reported, has decided that the problem arising from the shortage of silver coin can be met, at least in part, by issuing a coinage about 50 per cent fine, and it is announed semi-officially that the national mint, long closed, will be re-opened for the re-minting of about 250.000 pesos, which will make 500,000 pesos of the new silver currency. The Hondurasth for the silver it contains about 75 cents or even more in the United States, and which also contained a small quantity of gold, has long been quoted around 44 cents (gold) in Honduras. Despite laws enacted to discourage its exportation, so much of this silver currency has been shipped out of the country because of the profit to be mad

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1911

    30/6/1911

    Highlight: The following smaller foreign coins circulate at face value in Honduras: The 25- cent and 12J-cent pieces of Guatemala and the 20-cent and 10-cent pieces of Nica- ragua. Coining Money in Honduras. By Consul Arminlus T. Haeberle, Tegucigalpa. [Taken from Dally Consular and Trade Reports, Oct. 8, 1910.] On Februa^ 16, 1910, the mint of Honduras was opened after having been closed two years, owing to the fact that most of the silver in bars is exported to other countries. At present (August, 1910) the Government is coining some silver, but chiefly copper coins, to replace the amount which disappeared from circulation. According to information received, copper was formerly bought at 1.50 pesos per pound (about 56 cents gold), while 1 J pesos worth of copper coins weighed 1 pound 6 ounces. In

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1910

    30/6/1910

    Highlight: 133 Coining Money in Honduras. By Consul AsMiNins T. Haebeble, Tegucigalpa. [TfJran from Daily Consular and Trade Reports, October 8, 1910.] On Februa^ 16, 1910, the mint of Honduras was opened after having been closed two years, owing to the fact that most of the silver in bars is exported to other coimtries. At present ^August, 1910) the Government is coining some ^ver, but chiefly copper coins, to replace the amount which disappeared from circulation. According to information received, copper was formerly nought at 1.50 pesos per poimd (about 55 cents gold), while IJ pesos worth of copper coins weighed 1 poimd 6 ounces. In other words, if one bought coins to equal the value of 1 pound or copper, there was a gain of 6 ounces in actual weight. As a result copper coins begin to aisappear

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    U.S. Mint Report (1923)

    1/1/1923

    Highlight: The Government of Honduras does not issue paper currency. Two domestic banks, the Banco de Honduras and the Banco Atlantida, are banks of issue. The former is required by its concession to maintain 40 per cent of its paper circulation amount in native silver as a reserve; the latter maintains as a reserve 50 per cent of its paper circulation in American currency of any description. The Bank of Hon- duras is requited to redeem up to its full paper issue in silver on demand. All paper issue of the Banco Atlantida bears a statement that it will be redeemed upon demand at 50 per cent of its value (the legal ratio) in American paper or metal currency. On January 24, 1919, the Government decreed American paper and metal currency to be legal tender with a comparative value of 200 per cent of the

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 11]

    /1857

    Highlight: 816 HONDURAS, and the Bay of Conchagua, on the Pacific ; S.E. by Mosquita and Nicaragua. Area, 64,680 geographical square miles, and is divided in 7 departments, viz. : DKPARTM15WT8. Comayagua, . OholutxLca, Gracias, Yoro, . Total, . Population. 85.000 38.000 19.000 31.000 DfCPARnnCNlTB. Tejucigalpa, . Olanclio, Santa Barbara, Population. 45,000 45.000 35.000 308,000 Of the vegetable productions of Honduras, the mahogany-tree stands first in importance, and, from its vast size and magnificent foliage, is de- servedly entitled, “king of the forest.” It is to he found in nearly all parts of Honduras, in the valleys of the

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 82]

    /1911

    Highlight: HONDURAS tifically, the silver and the gold metals. Between 1879 and 1902' silver was coined to the value of 918,690.97 pesos; gold to the value of 1,191.00 pesos, and copper to the value of 89,103.96 pesos. The Present Circulation. The amount of money in actual circula- tion in Honduraslooked upon as a curiosity. Gold itself, as a metal, forms a considerable export. Of the national silver there is little in circulation and none is being coined. It has practically all been driven out by the cheaper money from other countries, for the Honduras peso contains a slight admix- ture of gold, which makes it profitable to export. Copper coins are also very scarce, so much so that on the north

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    The Bankers Magazine [vol. 89]

    /1914

    Highlight: the Banco de Hondurasrculation, and only a few thousand pesos in copper coins of one or two centavos. It is probably not far off the mark to say that the active circulation of silver pesos and fractional silver money is about 1,250,000 pesos. This is made up of silver coinage of all Central and South American countries, those of Chile, Peru and Guatemala predomi- nating. There is only a small amount of Honduras pesos, owing to the fact that the Honduras peso, being coined from native

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 31 (1918)

    /1918

    Highlight: HONDURAS. — Consul F. J. Dyer, of Tegucigalpa, reports to the Depart- ment of Commerce that the Government of Hondurascided that the problem arising from the shortage of silver coin can be met. at least in part, by issuing a coinage about 50 per cent, fine, and it is announced semi- officially that the national mint, long closed, will be reopened for the remint- ing of about 250.000 pesos, which will make 500,000 pesos of the new silver currency. The Hondurasthe silver it con- tains about 75 cents or even more in New York, and which also contained a small quantity of gold, has long been quoted around 44 cents (gold) in Honduras. Despite laws enacted to discourage its exportation, so much of this silver currency has been shipped out of the country

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    The Numismatist, Vol. 31 (1918)

    /1918

    Highlight: HONDURAS. — Consul F. J. Dyer, of Tegucigalpa, reports to the Depart- ment of Commerce that the Government of Hondurascided that the problem arising from the shortage of silver coin can be met. at least in part, by issuing a coinage about 50 per cent, fine, and it is announced semi- officially that the national mint, long closed, will be reopened for the remint- ing of about 250.000 pesos, which will make 500,000 pesos of the new silver currency. The Hondurasthe silver it con- tains about 75 cents or even more in New York, and which also contained a small quantity of gold, has long been quoted around 44 cents (gold) in Honduras. Despite laws enacted to discourage its exportation, so much of this silver currency has been shipped out of the country

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    The Numismatist, August 1967

    1/8/1967

    Highlight: 1 1895 1897 1900 1911 $66,808 $74,210 $82,546 $136,364 Estimated average monthly paper money in circulation — British Honduras Gazette. There is a considerable gap in onr knowledge of currency statistics un- til suddenly, in the year 1911 when further legislation affecting coinage was enacted, we discover that there is now a Note Account published by the Commissioner of Currency. He states (3) that of $247,545 traceable in notes of all kinds the amount “in chest’’ ($111,394) is nearly equal to the amount in circulation— the notes in circulation being 100% gold back- ed— and for the first time, we have evidence that exactly $213.00 of pro- visional bank notes are still outstand- ing. These provisional bank notes were never redeemed and they remain, in my opinion, among the most enigma- tic,

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    The Numismatist, August 1967

    1/8/1967

    Highlight: In 1957 the situation in Belize was such that it was still possible to obtain quantities of the early large coppers in change and only a little patience was needed to acquire a com- plete British Honduras date and type set. By 1960, the hoarding of bag-lot quantities of British Honduras coins by U. S. speculators was an estabhsh- ed practice. Transportation from Miami or New Orleans was less than $100, and there were no restrictions on the exportation of coin from the country. Inroads by speculators were such that an acute coin shortage resulted. Tens of thousands of coins accumu- lated in Miami, Tampa and New Orleans while mint officials in England pon- dered the reasons for such a spectacu- lar and sudden attrition rate. Produc- tion increased substantially in the 1960s but to no lasting

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    CATALOGUE OF THE COLLECTION OF THE LATE EDWARD MARIS, M.D. OF PHILADELPHIA OF ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN, FOREIGN AND UNITED STATES COINS AND THE FINEST COLLECTION OF PAPER MONEY EVER OFFERED IN THE UNITED STATES.

    Highlight: Honduras. 2 r. 1831. Mm. t (Tegucigalpa.) Ex. fine. Honduras. Necessity. 4, 8 r. Copper 1857. Rudely pcs. struck. Honduras. Arms. 2, 8 pesos. 1S62. Struck from dies designed for gold coin. Copper. Vf. and good. 2 pcs/' 4 Honduras. View 1 real, nickel, 1869—1870. Very fine. of City, Mountains, etc. 4 pcs. Honduras. Arms. R. Tree. 10c., 25c., 50c. 1871. Fine. 3 pcs. Honduras. Liberty, flag, law. 25c., 50c. Peso. 1881-5. Very fine. y f 3 pcs.

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    REPRESENTATIVE OF ALL NATIONS. CATALOGUE OF A VERY EXTENSIVE COLLECTION OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER COINS & MEDALS, PRINCIPALLY FROM THE CABINETS OF WINSLOW J. HOWARD, AND FRANCIS HOLSTEIN.

    Highlight: of Honduras; very fine. 1862 Copper Half Dollar of Honduras5 Cents, Maximilian ; all good. 4 pieces. 1864 Ten Cents ; 1865 Five Cents, Maximilian ; fine. 2 pieces. Mexican War Medal, Napoleon III, for campaign in Mexico, under Maximilian, 1862-3, half dollar size ; with loop and ring. See Plate. 1863 Five and Ten Centavos of the Republic of Mexico ; uncirculated, brilliant. 2 pieces. 1869, ’70 Quarter and Eighth Reals of Honduras ; un- circulated. 2 pieces. 1871 Flalf Dollar. Honduras ; very fine. 1872 Quarter Real of Honduras; pattern piece in alu- minum ; proof, very rare. 1872 Dollar. Mexico; brilliant -or proof. 1874 Two Reals. Mexico; fine. 1880 Dollar. Mexico ; fine. 1881 Ten

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    The August 2013 Chicago ANA Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: 2013 Rare King George VI British Honduras Five Dollars BRITISH HONDURAS 10068 Government of British Hondurasated grade and is found with radiant inks, original paper and lovely centering and margins. Vertical center fold along with some light corner bends are all we mention. PMG has graded only three finer, with two at this level. PMG Pop. 2/3 finer. PMG About Uncirculated 55 EPQ $3500-$4500 Remarkable Second Offering 10070 Government of British Honduras. $2, 1.4.1964. P-29b. One of the more pleasing notes of this 1964 series date we have handled that offers great color, original paper and nice centering. PMG Gem Uncirculate

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    Select paper currency & coins of the world : featuring the King Farouk collection of Latin American banknote's ... [08/21-23/1972]

    Highlight: All are ABNC HONDURASEL BANCO ATLANTIDA, 1 Peso (Silver), April 1, 1913. Seated woman with anchor center. Black & multicolor. 162 X 72, Series A, Serial #028798, ABNC, About Fine 27.50 EL BANCO NACIONAL HONDURENO, 2 Pesos, Undated. Sailor leaning on capstan left. Man in naval uniform center. Black & orange with red serial number. 167 X 72mm, Series A, Serial #01350, ABNC. Very Fine. . 35.00 EL BANCO DE HONDURAS, 1 Lempira, Feb. 11, 1932. Native with bowand arrows left. Coat of arms right. Blue & multicolor, 155 X 65fflm, Series A, Serial #020719, W&S, Good-Very Good 15.00 EL BANCO CENTRAL DE HONDURAS arms right. Red. 157 X 67mm, Serial 5^957013, W&S. Extremely Fine 6.00 EL BANCO CENTRAL DE HONDURAS, 1 Lempira, May 4, 1951. Portrait of

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