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    Harlan J. Berk, Ltd. 85th Buy or Bid Sale

    Highlight: From Umma in the far south of Iraq. Dated to the 12th month of the 41st year of Shulgi, second king of the Third Dynasty of Ur, c. 2054 B.C. 40x39 mm 500 655. Clay tablet inscribed with nine lines of Sumerian cuneiform on obverse and reverse, also rolled with the scribe's seal, the seal inscription reading: “Albanidug, son of Ur-nigingar, priest of Inanna of Uruk.” Administrative document recording the receipt of 6 gur 150 sila of barley as offerings for Inanna of Uruk. From Umma, a town near the Gulf, Dated to the 1 1th month of the 41st year of Shulgi, second king of the Third Dynasty of Ur, c. 2054 B.C. 43 X 40 mm 500 656. Clay tablet inscribed with ten lines of Sumerian cuneiform on obverse and reverse, also impression of cylinder seal inscription. Administrative record of receipt of 3

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1930

    /1930

    Highlight: IRAQ (MESOPOTAMIA) The Currency of Iraq [By Consul Alexander K. Sloan, Baghdad, in Commerce Reports, May 26, 1930] The unit of currency accepted as legal tender in Iraq is the Indian rupee. No laws establish its parity in Iraq, which is announced daily by the banks according to information from India. The average par value of the rupee in Iraq during the past four years has been $0.3636 and no great deviations have been noted. Laws Establishing the Rupee as Legal Tender The legislative bodies of Iraq have not passed any laws establishing the Indian rupee as legal tender, but it is accepted as such on the basis of military procla- mations. Recently, the Ministry of Justice, in reply to a query from the Min- istry of Finance as to the legal par value of the Turkish gold lira, referred that

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    Annual Report of the Director of the Mint for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1930

    /1930

    Highlight: IRAQ (MESOPOTAMIA) The Currency of Iraq [By Consul Alexander K. Sloan, Baghdad, in Commerce Reports, May 26, 1930] The unit of currency accepted as legal tender in Iraq is the Indian rupee. No laws establish its parity in Iraq, which is announced daily by the banks according to information from India. The average par value of the rupee in Iraq during the past four years has been $0.3636 and no great deviations have been noted. Laws Establishing the Rupee as Legal Tender The legislative bodies of Iraq have not passed any laws establishing the Indian rupee as legal tender, but it is accepted as such on the basis of military procla- mations. Recently, the Ministry of Justice, in reply to a query from the Min- istry of Finance as to the legal par value of the Turkish gold lira, referred that

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    Calcoin News, vol. 57, no. 4

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: 1943 The Republic of Iraq 1958 - 1979 Despite economic progress, Iraq continued to suffer from political insta- bility. Finally in 1 958, the monarchy was overthrown in a bloody revolution. King Faisal II along with other mem- bers of the royal family were executed and the Republic of Iraqwas controlled by various military and political factions through a series of coups and assassina- tions, rather than free elections. Stainless steel 5 & 10 Fils, 1975, issued to commemorate the United Nations Food and Agriculture Or- ganization (FAQ) Iraq Under Saddam Hussein 1979 - 2003 Saddam Hussein became President of the Republic of Iraq in July 1979. Numerous potential rivals were exe- cuted. In 1980 Iraq invaded Iran. The war

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    Calcoin News, vol. 57, no. 4

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: Mosul and al-Hille by Kara Yusul for use in Iraq. The Ottoman Empire 1534 - 1914 The Ottoman Turks conquered Iraq in 1 534. They continued to control the area for most of the next 500 years, until driven out by the British during World War I. Iraq was called Mesopo- tamia at the time. During much of this period Iraq used the standard coins of the Ottoman Empire, however there are a few issues of the Baghdad mint made for use exclusively in Iraq. One of these is this rare silver Dirham of Ottoman Sultan Mehmed IV from the Baghdad mint. The coin was struck to a standard used only in Meso- potamia. In 1648 Mehmed IV suc- ceeded his mentally ill father to the throne at age six. For most of his life he was controlled by various factions of the court. He participated in unsuc- cessful military

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    Calcoin News, vol. 57, no. 4

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: Mosul and al-Hille by Kara Yusul for use in Iraq. The Ottoman Empire 1534 - 1914 The Ottoman Turks conquered Iraq in 1 534. They continued to control the area for most of the next 500 years, until driven out by the British during World War I. Iraq was called Mesopo- tamia at the time. During much of this period Iraq used the standard coins of the Ottoman Empire, however there are a few issues of the Baghdad mint made for use exclusively in Iraq. One of these is this rare silver Dirham of Ottoman Sultan Mehmed IV from the Baghdad mint. The coin was struck to a standard used only in Meso- potamia. In 1648 Mehmed IV suc- ceeded his mentally ill father to the throne at age six. For most of his life he was controlled by various factions of the court. He participated in unsuc- cessful military

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    Calcoin News, vol. 57, no. 4

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: 1943 The Republic of Iraq 1958 - 1979 Despite economic progress, Iraq continued to suffer from political insta- bility. Finally in 1 958, the monarchy was overthrown in a bloody revolution. King Faisal II along with other mem- bers of the royal family were executed and the Republic of Iraqwas controlled by various military and political factions through a series of coups and assassina- tions, rather than free elections. Stainless steel 5 & 10 Fils, 1975, issued to commemorate the United Nations Food and Agriculture Or- ganization (FAQ) Iraq Under Saddam Hussein 1979 - 2003 Saddam Hussein became President of the Republic of Iraq in July 1979. Numerous potential rivals were exe- cuted. In 1980 Iraq invaded Iran. The war

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    The N.A.S.C. Quarterly

    1/10/2003

    Highlight: Mosul and al-Hille by Kara Yusuf for use in Iraq. The Ottoman Empire 1534 - 1914 The Ottoman Turks conquered Iraq in 1534. They continued to control the area for most of the next 500 years, until driven out by the British during World War I. Iraq was called Mesopo- tamia at the time. During much of this period Iraq used the standard coins of the Ottoman Empire, however there are a few issues of the Baghdad mint made for use exclusively in Iraq. One of these is this rare silver Dirham of Ottoman Sultan Mehmed IV from the Baghdad mint. The coin was struck to a standard used only in Meso- potamia. In 1648 Mehmed IV suc- ceeded his mentally ill father to the throne at age six. For most of his life he was controlled by various factions of the court. He participated in unsuc- cessful military

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    The N.A.S.C. Quarterly

    1/10/2003

    Highlight: 1943 The Republic of Iraq 1958 - 1979 Despite economic progress, Iraq continued to suffer from political insta- bility. Finally in 1958, the monarchy was overthrown in a bloody revolution. King Faisal II along with other mem- bers of the royal family were executed and the Republic of Iraq was controlled by various military and political factions through a series of coups and assassina- tions, rather than free elections. Stainless steel 5 & 10 Fils, 1975, issued to commemorate the United Nations Food and Agriculture Or- ganization (FAO) Iraq Under Saddam Hussein 1979 - 2003 Saddam Hussein became President of the Republic of Iraq in July 1979. Numerous potential rivals were exe- cuted. In 1980 Iraq invaded Iran. The war

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    The August 2016 ANA Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: 2016 IRAQ 31407 Government of Iraq. 1/4 Dinar, 1931 (ND 1942). P-1 6a. Lord Kennet signature. Guilloche design at center. Young King Faisal II at right and in watermark. PMG Very Fine 25 $300-$500 31408 Government of Iraq. 1/4 Dinar, 1931. P-22. King Faisal II featured at right and in watermark at left. Problem-free for the grade. PMG Very Fine 20 $600-$800 31409 National Bank of Iraq. 1 Dinar, 1947 (ND 1953). P-34. King Faisal II in watermark. Obverse featuring man on horse. No problems worthy of mention. PMG Very Fine 25 $300-$500 31410 National Bank of Iraqinson printed. Multicolored gradient underprint. PMG Very Fine 25 Net. Small Tears $500-$750 31411 Central Bank of Iraq. 1/2 Dinar, L.1947 (1959). P-43

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    The January 2017 NYINC Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: About Uncirculated & Uncirculated $150-$250 IRAQ 4294 Government of Iraq. 1/4 Dinar, 1931 (ND 1942). P-1 6a. Lord Kennet signature observed on this VF 1/4 Dinar design. King Faisal II at right. Staple holes seen in right margin. PMG mentions Minor Rust, and Stains in the comments section. PMG Very Fine 25 Net. Minor Rust, Stains $300-$500 4295 Government of Iraqs 1/2 Dinar issued note. Tape seen on the left which may be viewed as a distraction, although the tape is seen in the margin and does not interrupt the design. PMG Very Fine 25 Net. Tape $600-$800 4296 Government of Iraq. 1/4 Dinar, 1931. P-22. Kennet signature seen at the bottom. King Faisal II seen at right, and in watermark at left. Good centering, with some toning that we

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    The Coin Collector's Journal

    1/9/1947

    Highlight: In the year of Ghazi’s death the oil produc- tion of Iraq reached 4,295,126 tons. About half of this petroleum was piped to an oil terminus at Haifa (Palestine) and the remainder to Tripoli (Syria). Ghazi cultivated the rising foreign trade of Iraqout equally divided between Europe and Asia. The character of this trade diverged wide^ with Europe taking most of the exports of grain and hides in exchange for ma- chinery and manufactured articles. Asia, on the other hand, took most of the dates and cotton and in return Iraq re- ceived textiles, tea, sugar and timber. By 1933 when King Gh azi was in- stalled as ruler of Iraq the currency changes initiated by Faisal were well on their way to completion. Iraqi coins of the following denominations had been introduced: Denomination

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    The June 2011 Baltimore Auction

    Highlight: 201 1 IRAQ 11226 Government of Iraq. 5 Dinars, L1931 (1942). P-19. An always popular and scarce King Faisal as a child note. This example is well worn but still enjoys tremendous appeal for the grade. Rough margins and a few larger splits are cited. VERY GOOD $300-$500 11227 Government of Iraqarce 10 Dinar note showing King Faisal as a child at right with deep purple inks making up the frame. The appeal of an EF is mentioned although we see a few too many folds and graffiti in the watermark field. VERY FINE $1500-$2000 11228 Government of Iraq. 1/4 Dinar, L.1931. P-22. A slightly more challenging design showing a young King Faisal II at right. Even circulation and strong bodied paper with mostly problem free paper. VERY FINE $300-$500 11229

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    IRAQ COIN PROMOTION

    IRAQ COIN PROMOTION

    07/31/2005

    Highlight: IRAQ COIN PROMOTION http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v08n33a08.html

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 33, July 31, 2005, Article 8

    IRAQthe general public.

    "They are piled 3 feet high in a 1,225-square-foot portion
    of a Charlotte warehouse, roughly 7 million bagged coins
    that sparkle even in the dim light.

    The coins were once part of Saddam Hussein's currency,
    all of them fils of varying smaller denominations.

    They have no value in Iraq -- except for their melted-down
    copper nickel and stainless steel.

    But two Charlotte men, Michael

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 33, July 31, 2005, Article 8

    IRAQ COIN PROMOTION

    Roger

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    The Coin Collector's Journal

    1/9/1947

    Highlight: STORY AND DESIGN OC MODERN COINS IRAQ Iraq, an Arab Kingdom in Western A.sia, occupies the territory formerly known as Mesopotamia. Previously part of the Ottoman Empire, it was recog' nized as an independent state by the Treaty of Lausanne and placed under the mandate of Great Britain. When, in 1932, Iraq was admitted to the League of Nations, it was freed of all mandatory control and embarked on its career as an independent state. The successful launching of Iraq as a nation is to no small extent due to the untiring energy, solicitude and sagacity of her first King, Faisal I. His life span was only fifty years but it included such varied experiences as Bedouin Chief, commander of Turkish troops, member of Ottoman Parliament from Jeddah, commander of an Arab army under Gen' eral Allenby i

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    U.S. HOMELAND SECURITY MEDALS FOR IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN

    09/30/2012

    Highlight: SECURITY MEDALS FOR IRAQites:

    A close friend just informed me of the new decorations for Homeland Security (Customs, Border, Patrol [CBP]), and I immediately thought of you and the E-Sylum members.

    Thanks! Below are the images and text forwarded by Ray's friend. -Editor

    "My agency finally got around to issuing Iraq and Afghanistan Service medals. I'm sending you images. I'll bet you'll be the first kid on the numismatic block to get these. Only a couple of hundred CBP personnel have served in Iraq, and only a dozen or so in

    Ray Bows wri

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    IRAQ COIN PROMOTION

    IRAQ COIN PROMOTION

    07/31/2005

    Highlight: IRAQeneurs there made a bulkpurchase of obsolete Iraqi coinage, with the intention ofmarketing it to the general public."They are piled 3 feet high in a 1,225-square-foot portionof a Charlotte warehouse, roughly 7 million bagged coinsthat sparkle even in the dim light.The coins were once part of Saddam Hussein's currency,all of them fils of varying smaller denominations.They have no value in Iraq -- except for their melted-downcopper nickel and stainless steel.But two Charlotte men, Michael Crowder and Lane Ostrow,are betting they are worth millions on the

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 33, July 31, 2005, Article 8IRAQ COIN PROMOTIONRoger deWardt Lane forw

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    The Shekel, vol. 35, no. 3 (May-June 2002)

    /2002

    Highlight: invited and gave decisive help to the Moslem conquest of Iraq and indeed of other parts of the Middle East. Under the Caliphs of Baghdad the Jews paid a head tax and enjoyed religious and communal freedom. The authority of the Exilarch extended, as in Persian times, to all parts of the Empire and this office lasted until the 14th Century. Thereafter the community was headed by a local Nasi who, until recent times, was also always of the Davidic line. He was assisted by a Hakham. In 1849 both positions were united in a Hakham Bashi (Chief Rabbi). To establish a Jewdsh Middle class in Europe Charlemagne had asked Harun al-Rashid to send Jewish teachers. These came with Rabbi Machir who was given by Charlemagne a Princedom in Narbonne and was known as King of the Jews. With the fall of Sa’ad

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    The March 2011 Baltimore Auction

    Highlight: CHOICE UNCIRCULATED $200-$300 IRAQ 11278 Government of Iraq. 1 Dinar, L.1931 (1934). P-9. A highly difficult note to locate in attractive grades such as this pleasing VF note. Original embossing of the se- rial numbers is detected and light even circulation noted. A small repair at the top margin is sighted for accuracy. VERY FINE $2000-$3000 11279 Government of Iraq. 1/4, 1/2 & 1 Dinar, L.1931 (1942). P-16 to 18. 3 pieces in lot. A nice group of the lesser de- nominations of this popular series. The 1/4 Dinar note in the most circulated showing some harder folds and a few light spot stains for a Fine grade. The 1/2 Dinar note is a pleasing Very Fine example with nice and even circulation with a bit of light soiling to mention. The One Dinar is the most pleas- ing with original paper and

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    NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQ

    NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQ

    04/03/2005

    Highlight: NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQ http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v08n14a02.html

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 14, April 3, 2005, Article 2

    NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQThe following item is reprinted with permission from the
    Friday, April 1, 2005 issue of the MPC Gram (Series 006 -
    Number 1267), an email newsletter covering "the entire
    World of Military Numismatics"

    In a startling move the United States issued military payment
    certificates in Iraq yesterday. The move was a surprise to
    military and civilian personnel, but most of all to collectors.
    The new issue in denominations $1 through $50 is Series 002.
    The notes feature vignettes of space flight on the faces and
    military hardware on the backs. Immediate reports from

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 14, April 3, 2005, Article 2

    NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSU

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    Financial History

    1/1/2006

    Highlight: while the CPA could construct a legal and regula- tory structure for Iraq to follow, it was up to the new Iraqi government to follow suit. Trading on the Iraq Stock Exchange commenced on June 24, 2004, complete with opening bell — a Liberty Bell replica, donated by the Philadelphia Stock Exchange. In its first morning of operation, “more than 500 million shares were traded — more than the Baghdad Stock Exchange ever achieved — with shares in jusr six companies chang- ing hands... 12 companies actively traded on the second session on Sun- day, July 4. “Their aggregate share price at the end of the morning was $2.66 mil- lion, up from $2.21 million at the start, for a 20% rise, the exchange said in a statement, adding that 560 million stocks changed hands.”" The bourse was established in a

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    ARCHIVES INTERNATIONAL SALE 44 ANNOUNCED

    08/06/2017

    Highlight: Middle Eastern banknotes from Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan, Morocco and numerous other countries; an exciting assortment of U.S. Obsolete banknotes, 3 different uncut Confederate banknote sheets as well as hundreds of other desirable banknotes, coins, bonds and shares.

    The first session includes 623 lots of Chinese, Middle Eastern and Worldwide banknotes, coins, and Chinese Scripophily, beginning at 10:30 AM EST. The second session will include 350 lots of U.S. Banknotes, Scripophily, Security Printing Ephemera and historic that will begin no earlier than 4:00 PM local time after the first session has ended. For those unable to attend in person, online bidding will be available through the website, www.ArchivesInternational.com.

    “The worldwide banknote market has been exceptional

    Here is the announcement for the August 29, 2017 sale by Archives International Au

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    Calcoin News, vol. 57, no. 4

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: Mongol Control of Iraq The llkhanid Dynasty 1258 - 1335 After over a decade of attempts, the Mongols finally conquered and sacked Baghdad in 1258AD. The last Abbasid Caliph, who had little more than spiri- tual authority, was killed, along with hundreds of thousands of Baghdad resi- dents. The Mongols destroyed the dikes needed for the irrigation system used by the farmers that fed the huge city. The city did not recover its prosperity until the 20th Century. Baghdad became a provincial capital for the Ilkhanids, the Mongol dynasty that was based in Iran. Pictured is a silver Double Dirham struck in Baghdad by the Ilkhan ruler Abu Said who reigned from 1315 to 1335AD. During his reign his Ilkhan kingdom underwent a financial and political collapse. Multiple rivals claimed the throne upon

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    TAMS Journal, Vol. 49, No. 6

    1/12/2009

    Highlight: IMilitary Tokens of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars by Gary G. Aschcr The military tokens currently being used by U.S. and British troops in Afghanistan and Iraq are commonly referred to as “pogs.” Personally, I disdain the use of the word “pogs” to describe the laminated cardboard tokens used in the Afghanistan and Iraq theatres of war. The collecting community seems to automatically assign the tag "pogs” to any round, half dollar sized item made of card- board. Pogs were a craze as recently as the 1990s. They were actually used to play a game, a modern day version of marbles that was played using “slamniers” (versus “shooters" for marbles). The original appeal of the pogs was the artwork and subject matter, and soon the original purpose of using them in a game was abandoned and a collectin

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    ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM

    ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM

    01/02/2005

    Highlight: ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v08n01a03.html The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 1, January 2, 2005, Article 3ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM Chris Fuccione forwarded the following information about a project sponsored by the American Numismatic Society: "It has been well over a year since the Iraq Museum was looted in the aftermath of the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. Thankfully, the museum's collection of some 100,000 coins miraculously escaped when looters? who somehow had keys to cabinets where the collection was stored, dropped them in the dark and confusion. Unfortunately, the museum's offices and other parts of the collection were not so lucky. While the initial reports of looting were exaggerated, the

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 1, January 2, 2005, Article 3ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR

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    Calcoin News, vol. 57, no. 4

    1/9/2003

    Highlight: Mongol Control of Iraq The llkhanid Dynasty 1258 - 1335 After over a decade of attempts, the Mongols finally conquered and sacked Baghdad in 1258AD. The last Abbasid Caliph, who had little more than spiri- tual authority, was killed, along with hundreds of thousands of Baghdad resi- dents. The Mongols destroyed the dikes needed for the irrigation system used by the farmers that fed the huge city. The city did not recover its prosperity until the 20th Century. Baghdad became a provincial capital for the Ilkhanids, the Mongol dynasty that was based in Iran. Pictured is a silver Double Dirham struck in Baghdad by the Ilkhan ruler Abu Said who reigned from 1315 to 1335AD. During his reign his Ilkhan kingdom underwent a financial and political collapse. Multiple rivals claimed the throne upon

    Read more

    TAMS Journal, Vol. 49, No. 6

    1/12/2009

    Highlight: IMilitary Tokens of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars by Gary G. Aschcr The military tokens currently being used by U.S. and British troops in Afghanistan and Iraq are commonly referred to as “pogs.” Personally, I disdain the use of the word “pogs” to describe the laminated cardboard tokens used in the Afghanistan and Iraq theatres of war. The collecting community seems to automatically assign the tag "pogs” to any round, half dollar sized item made of card- board. Pogs were a craze as recently as the 1990s. They were actually used to play a game, a modern day version of marbles that was played using “slamniers” (versus “shooters" for marbles). The original appeal of the pogs was the artwork and subject matter, and soon the original purpose of using them in a game was abandoned and a collectin

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    The Numismatist, August 1970

    1/8/1970

    Highlight: Iraq An independent country in south- western Asia and a republic since 1958, Iraq recently extended its series of current definitive minor coins to include two ad- ditional denominations— 25 and 50 fils. Withoutamintof itsown, Iraqls, 1969. Copper-nickel. Obverse: three palmtrees between the Gregorian date 1969 at left and the Mohammedan date 1388 at right; more palmtrees in background. Reverse: value within a center circle, 25 FILS; an awn of wheat and a tobacco leaf below; legend at top, AL CUMHURIYETI AL IRAQ (The Republic of Iraq), all in Arabic script. Diameter 20mm. Weight 2.75 grams. Edge milled. Y-34. 50 fils, 1969. Copper-nickel. Similar to 25 fils except for size, weight and value. Diameter 23mm.

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    The N.A.S.C. Quarterly

    1/10/2003

    Highlight: Mongol Control of Iraq The llkhanid Dynasty 1258 - 1335 After over a decade of attempts, the Mongols finally conquered and sacked Baghdad in 1258AD. The last Abbasid Caliph, who had little more than spiri- tual authority, was killed, along with hundreds of thousands of Baghdad resi- dents. The Mongols destroyed the dikes needed for the irrigation system used by the farmers that fed the huge city. The city did not recover its prosperity until the 20th Century. Baghdad became a provincial capital for the Ilkhanids, the Mongol dynasty that was based in Iran. Pictured is a silver Double Dirham struck in Baghdad by the Ilkhan ruler Abu Said who reigned from 1315 to 1335AD. During his reign his Ilkhan kingdom underwent a financial and political collapse. Multiple rivals claimed the throne upon

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    The August 2016 ANA Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: II One Dinar IRAQ 30278 Government of Iraq. I Dinar, 1931 (ND 1941). P-15. One of the most underrated series of Iraqoffering is by far the finest we have seen. Just a single light vertical fold makes up the circulation and the color is bold and defined throughout. Currently this note is the finest PMG has graded with no equals. A piece that will likely get strong attention from bidders. PMG Choice About Uncirculated 58 $5000-$7500 30279 Government of Iraq. I Dinar, ND (1941). P-15. A challenging Iraq note which shows

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    ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM

    ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM

    01/02/2005

    Highlight: ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v08n01a03.html

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 1, January 2, 2005, Article 3

    ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLICATIONS FOR IRAQ MUSEUM

    Chris Fuccione forwarded the following information
    about a project sponsored by the American Numismatic
    Society:

    "It has been well over a year since the Iraq Museum
    was looted in the aftermath of the fall of Saddam
    Hussein's regime. Thankfully, the museum's collection
    of some 100,000 coins miraculously escaped when
    looters— who somehow had keys to cabinets where the
    collection was stored, dropped them in the dark and
    confusion. Unfortunately, the museum's offices and
    other parts of the collection were not so lucky.

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 1, January 2, 2005, Article 3

    ANS COLLECTS NUMISMATIC PUBLIC

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    ANCIENT GOLD COIN HOARD DISCOVERED IN IRAQ

    01/13/2013

    Highlight: ANCIENT GOLD COIN HOARD DISCOVERED IN IRAQ http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v16n02a31.html

    John Sallay forwarded this article from Art Daily about an ancient gold coin find in Iraq. Thanks. -Editor

    IRAQ-ARCHAEOLOGY-COINS by Numismatic Bibliomania Society, on Flickr"><b style=IRAQ-ARCHAEOLOGY-COINS"> Iraqi archaeologists have found 66 gold coins that are at least 1,400 years old, officials said on Monday, adding that they hope to put them on display in Baghdad's National Museum. The artefacts

    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 26-28

    /1981

    Highlight: Iraqhe history of his family. The Hamdanid emirate of Mosul was a tribal chiefdom with no regular army and little ability to defend itself against a powerful neighbor. Its independence had become an accomplished fact in the early 320s/930s as a result of the 'Abbasid government’s inability to hold on to Mesopotamia. Since economic chaos and agricultural deterioration were among the root causes of Iraq’s weakness, it was moreover to be expected that the reforming caliphs would be anxious to regain control of Mesopotamia’s rich agricultural resources. Nasir al-Dawla fought twice to defend the Hamdanid emirate against the Caliph al-Radi (in 323/935 and again in 327/938). But what he feared most

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 26-28

    /1981

    Highlight: on Iraq, was to bring Diyar Mudar and northern Syria under direct rule and thereby block all practicable routes between Syria and Iraq. Once occupied, the mints of these territories were made to cite the Hamdanids on the coinage, but this was only in the spirit that impelled Nasir al- Dawla to assume the right of coinage in Iraq. During the next year Nasir al-Dawla made no attempt to incorporate Diyar Mudar and northern Syria into the Hamdanid domain any more than he did so with Iraqid policy towards the caliphate underwent only a slight change after Nasir al-Dawla had given up the office of amir al-umard’ in Sha'ban 331 /April 943. Iraq’s many

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 26-28

    /1981

    Highlight: 150 Ramzi Jibran Bikhazi of Iraq was less unpalatable to Nasir al-Dawla than years before. Twice before 334/945, N§sir al-Dawla had demonstrated his changing attitude toward the Buwayhids. In the fall of 331/942, while holding office in Baghdad, he had negotiated with Mu'izz al-Dawla a two-pronged attack against their common enemy, the Barldis of southern Iraq* 9 (who, incidently, were another bulwark against Buwayhid expansion); and in 333/944, when Tuzun’s deteriorating health made the Buwayhid occupation of Iraq a possibility, Nasir al-Dawla sent an embassy to Mu'izz al-Dawla in Fars, bearing money and gifts. 30 By 334/945, Nasir al-Dawla was willing to acquiesce in a Buwayhid occupation of Baghdad, though not to the point of recognizing Buway- hid overlordship. When the Buwayhids

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    The Shekel, vol. 33, no. 2 (March-April 2000)

    /2000

    Highlight: Israel reacted jubilantly to the news that Iraq'srisingly, the international community reacted in quite another way, invoking the usual anti-Israel double standard to condemn the Jewish state for its alleged "bolt from the blue." The attack, according to this point of view, constituted yet another example of the Begin government's unacceptably militaristic conduct. Israeli leaders, though, had been very worried about Iraq's nuclear ambitions - and very determined to thwart them - before Begin took over the reigns of government in 1977. Once it learned that France had decided to sell Iraq a nuclear reactor for "peaceful purposes," for instance, the first Rabin

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 18, No.10

    1/10/1984

    Highlight: The Buwayhid Rulers of Iraq & Iran nos. 997-1010; The Great Saljuq Rulers of Iraq & Iran nos. 1011-1027; The Saljuq Rulers of Syria no. 1028; The Saljuq Rulers of Iraq nos. 1029-1030; The Saljuq Rulers of Kirman no. 1031; The Atabegs of Nahawand no. 1032; The Zangid Atabegs of Mosul nos. 1033-1044; The Qaysarid Amirs of Qays no. 1045; The Ilkhanid Rulers of Anatolia, Iran & Iraq nos. 1046- 1055; The Jalayrid Rulers of Iraq & Adharbayjan nos. 1056-7; The Aq Qoyunlu Rulers of Eastern Anatolia & Adharbayjan nos. 1058-1059; The Coinage of the Shahs of Iran nos. 1060-1107; The Mangit Rulers of Bukhara no. 1108; The Khanate of Khokand no. 1109; The Coinage of India & Afghanistan nos. 1110-1131; The Ghurid Rulers of Afghan- istan S India no. 1132; The Sultans of Delhi nos. 1133-1145; The

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    NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQ

    NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQ

    04/03/2005

    Highlight: NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQSylum: Volume 8, Number 14, April 3, 2005, Article 2NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQThe following item is reprinted with permission from theFriday, April 1, 2005 issue of the MPC Gram (Series 006 -Number 1267), an email newsletter covering "the entireWorld of Military Numismatics"In a startling move the United States issued military paymentcertificates in Iraq yesterday. The move was a surprise tomilitary and civilian personnel, but most of all to collectors.The new issue in denominations $1 through $50 is Series 002.The notes feature vignettes of space flight on the faces andmilitary hardware on the backs. Immediate reports from thefield have personnel using the notes saying

    The E-Sylum: Volume 8, Number 14, April 3, 2005, Article 2NEW MILITARY PAYMENT SCRIP ISSUED IN IRAQT

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    OSAMA BIN LADEN BANKNOTE

    02/16/2014

    Highlight: An extremist group operating in Iraq and Syria seems to have made a banknote bearing the image of Osama Bin Laden, in an apparent effort to declare sovereignty over areas in their control. The note claims to be worth "one Islamic hundred pounds" and says in both English and Arabic it is from the Islamic State in Iraqy suspicious about why the currency had been issued in pounds instead of Iraqi dinars, and added he did not think al-Qaeda would print English on its currency. Meanwhile, Shafaq News in Baghdad points out the extremist group emerging in Iraq's western Anbar province is usually known by a different name - The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS). The banknote

    The BBC News News from Elsewhere blog describes a banknote bearing the image of Osama Bin Laden. Ma

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 26-28

    /1981

    Highlight: Iraqhe history of his family. The Hamdanid emirate of Mosul was a tribal chiefdom with no regular army and little ability to defend itself against a powerful neighbor. Its independence had become an accomplished fact in the early 320s/930s as a result of the 'Abbasid government’s inability to hold on to Mesopotamia. Since economic chaos and agricultural deterioration were among the root causes of Iraq’s weakness, it was moreover to be expected that the reforming caliphs would be anxious to regain control of Mesopotamia’s rich agricultural resources. Nasir al-Dawla fought twice to defend the Hamdanid emirate against the Caliph al-Radi (in 323/935 and again in 327/938). But what he feared most

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 26-28

    /1981

    Highlight: on Iraq, was to bring Diyar Mudar and northern Syria under direct rule and thereby block all practicable routes between Syria and Iraq. Once occupied, the mints of these territories were made to cite the Hamdanids on the coinage, but this was only in the spirit that impelled Nasir al- Dawla to assume the right of coinage in Iraq. During the next year Nasir al-Dawla made no attempt to incorporate Diyar Mudar and northern Syria into the Hamdanid domain any more than he did so with Iraqid policy towards the caliphate underwent only a slight change after Nasir al-Dawla had given up the office of amir al-umard’ in Sha'ban 331 /April 943. Iraq’s many

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    ANS Museum Notes, vols. 26-28

    /1981

    Highlight: 150 Ramzi Jibran Bikhazi of Iraq was less unpalatable to Nasir al-Dawla than years before. Twice before 334/945, N§sir al-Dawla had demonstrated his changing attitude toward the Buwayhids. In the fall of 331/942, while holding office in Baghdad, he had negotiated with Mu'izz al-Dawla a two-pronged attack against their common enemy, the Barldis of southern Iraq* 9 (who, incidently, were another bulwark against Buwayhid expansion); and in 333/944, when Tuzun’s deteriorating health made the Buwayhid occupation of Iraq a possibility, Nasir al-Dawla sent an embassy to Mu'izz al-Dawla in Fars, bearing money and gifts. 30 By 334/945, Nasir al-Dawla was willing to acquiesce in a Buwayhid occupation of Baghdad, though not to the point of recognizing Buway- hid overlordship. When the Buwayhids

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    The Shekel, vol. 33, no. 2 (March-April 2000)

    /2000

    Highlight: Israel reacted jubilantly to the news that Iraq'srisingly, the international community reacted in quite another way, invoking the usual anti-Israel double standard to condemn the Jewish state for its alleged "bolt from the blue." The attack, according to this point of view, constituted yet another example of the Begin government's unacceptably militaristic conduct. Israeli leaders, though, had been very worried about Iraq's nuclear ambitions - and very determined to thwart them - before Begin took over the reigns of government in 1977. Once it learned that France had decided to sell Iraq a nuclear reactor for "peaceful purposes," for instance, the first Rabin

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    NI Bulletin

    1/7/2012

    Highlight: in Iraq &J )J-tJ Tabariya Tiberias, in Galilee p^V bi-Hims Emesa, in Syria j')A J bi-Harran Haran (Greek Carrhae), in Iraq hxbu Baalbek Baalbek, in Lebanon .La 344 L bi-el-Mawsil Mosul, in Iraqt, written as bi-Hims “in Hims” just below. Hims is in Syria, about a hundred miles North of Damascus. The Greeks and Romans knew it as Emesa. On Coin Three we find the full version of Legend ‘A’ written around the margin, including the date (116 AH), with bi- Harran for the mint; Haran is a town in Iraq, particularly interesting to Bible

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    Numismatics International Bulletin, Vol. 18, No.10

    1/10/1984

    Highlight: The Buwayhid Rulers of Iraq & Iran nos. 997-1010; The Great Saljuq Rulers of Iraq & Iran nos. 1011-1027; The Saljuq Rulers of Syria no. 1028; The Saljuq Rulers of Iraq nos. 1029-1030; The Saljuq Rulers of Kirman no. 1031; The Atabegs of Nahawand no. 1032; The Zangid Atabegs of Mosul nos. 1033-1044; The Qaysarid Amirs of Qays no. 1045; The Ilkhanid Rulers of Anatolia, Iran & Iraq nos. 1046- 1055; The Jalayrid Rulers of Iraq & Adharbayjan nos. 1056-7; The Aq Qoyunlu Rulers of Eastern Anatolia & Adharbayjan nos. 1058-1059; The Coinage of the Shahs of Iran nos. 1060-1107; The Mangit Rulers of Bukhara no. 1108; The Khanate of Khokand no. 1109; The Coinage of India & Afghanistan nos. 1110-1131; The Ghurid Rulers of Afghan- istan S India no. 1132; The Sultans of Delhi nos. 1133-1145; The

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    The June 2011 Baltimore Auction

    Highlight: $700-$1000 IRAQ 11222 Government of Iraq. 1 Dinar, L.1941 (1941). P-15. A challenging Indian printed note which shows with nice overall appeal and color. Minor repairs are sighted along with a touch of rust which are both mentioned in the comments section of the holder. PMG VERY FINE 25 NET. REPAIRS, RUST. $400-$600 11223 Government of Iraq. 1/4 Dinar, L.1931 0942). P-16. A pleasing lowest denomination note which is problem free, save for a couple pinholes. VERY FINE $300-$500 11224 Government of Iraqil and color throughout. Quite dif- ficult this nice and sure to create attention among bidders. CHOICE VERY FINE $300-$500 11225 Government of Iraq. 5 Dinars, L.1931

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    The January 2012 N.Y.I.N.C. Auction

    Highlight: 2012 Wonderful Fully Issued Government of Iraq 100 Dinars IRAQ 4510 Government of Iraqith originally embossed paper evident through the encapsulation surface. King Ghazi in military uniform at right with angled guilloche at center. Light graffiti on face and back along with a few margin tears are all we note. A rare piece and likely to see strong participation from bidders. PMG CHOICE FINE 15 NET. TEARS $6000-$8000 4511 National Bank of Iraq. 10 Dinars, L.1947 (1953). P-36. This King Faisal 1953 issue has enjoyed increased demand as of late for just cause. The note is a fantastic BWC design with

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    The August 2016 ANA Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: 2016 IRAQ 30281 Government of Iraq. 1 Dinar, 1931 (ND 1942). P-18b. This highly attractive note shows with stunning detail and color throughout. Quite difficult this nice and sure to create attention among bidders. PMG Choice Very Fine 35 $1500-$2000 30282 Government of Iraqnar seen with hard folds. Design still visible, and likely a good find for any collection. PCGS mentions edge and internal splits with writing on the back. PCGS Very Good 10 Apparent. Edge and Internal Splits; Writing on Back $1500-$2500 30283 Central Bank of Iraq. 5 Dinars, ND (1971). P-59cts. Color Trial Specimen. A scarce note in any grade. Seen here in specimen form with red overprints and a punch cancel at the signature panel. PMG mentions the note was previously

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    The January 2017 NYINC Auction, World Paper Money

    Highlight: Uncirculated $600-$ 1000 IRAQ 1201 Government of Iraq. 1 Dinar, 1931. P-15. One of the most underrated series of Iraq offering is by far the finest we have seen. Just a single light vertical fold makes up the circulation and the color is bold and defined throughout. Currently this note is the finest PMG has graded with no equals. A piece that will likely get strong attention from bidders. PMG Choice About Uncirculated 58 $5000-$7500 1202 Government of Iraq. 1/2 Dinar, 1931 (ND 1942). P-17a. An interesting BWC design

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    CLIFFORD DONATES BOOKS TO U.S. SOLDIERS IN IRAQ

    CLIFFORD DONATES BOOKS TO U.S. SOLDIERS IN IRAQ

    01/28/2007

    Highlight: SOLDIERS IN IRAQ http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v10n04a06.html

    The E-Sylum: Volume 10, Number 4, January 28, 2007, Article 6

    CLIFFORD DONATES BOOKS TO U.S. SOLDIERS IN IRAQ

    Jim Barry writes: "As a follow up to the recent items on James R.
    Clifford's book, "Double Daggers", he has recently donated two boxes
    of his books to our troops in Iraq. It is my understanding that,
    from our friend in Iraqtroops."

    I checked with Jamie Clifford and he adds "I feel the real credit
    should go to Col. William Myers. He is a member of Jim's coin club
    and he is a surgeon serving in Iraq. We have teamed up and I send
    the books over to him and he distributes them to the

    The E-Sylum: Volume 10, Number 4, January 28, 2007, Article 6

    CLIFFORD DONATES BOOKS TO U.

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