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    lewyn

    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 129

    1/12/2005

    Highlight: to one who lived in Maryland: Gabriel Lewyn. Evidence of Lewyn’s involvement with this currency can be found within engraved designs on some 1 776 bills, namely the incorporation of the initials “GL.”'*'' If Lewyn were, indeed, responsible for the entire 1776 issue, he either printed the money in Maryland and shipped the unsigned, unnumbered, and uncut sheets to North Carolina; or he shipped his copper plates there, most likely to Davis, who used them in New Bern to print the currency on compatible equipment. Another unknown with regard to New Bern’s smallpox epidemic is whether James Davis himself was among the citizens who contracted the virus. By 1 779, the printer would have been just shy of sixty years of age, so he may have had an earlier bout with the disease and been immune. Still,

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 15

    Highlight: These were printed from engraved copper plates ordered from Baltimore and crafted by silver and goldsmith Gabriel Lewyn. Some of the denomination’s border cuts are signed by him with his initials ‘GL’. There is no detailed research about Lewyn work on the plates he cut. Lewyn’s prolific period was from 1770 to 1780 at his shop located on Gay Street. The spelling of his name is not clear cut and it may have been Liwyn based on his church records. Some of his signed silver is known and it is very rare. The reason for the use of fifty-six different vignettes on the notes can only be conjectured at this point. As a series, they certainly are remi- niscent of the Georgia color seal notes from 1776 and 1777. All the notes were printed uni- face on many different paper types from thin laid paper

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    The 52 Collection, Art & Security on American Paper Currencies

    Highlight: from plates engraved by Gabriel Lewyna choice example. The paper quality is top flight. The margins are complete. One short back endorsement. (1,000-1,500) From a Private Collection. North Carolina Currency. April 2, 1776 at Halifax. Fifteen Dol- lars. Boar. Very Fine-25 (PMG). No.467. Signed by Wm. Williams, J. Webb, D.[avid] Sumner, and W.[illiam] Haywood. Printed on laid paper, from engraved plates by Gabriel Lewyn, Baltimore. Uniface. Boar vignette at lower left, flourish vertically above on edge, titles at top. Right end, outlined denomination in white. Well pedigreed for certain. Very short

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    NEWMAN COLLECTION COLONIAL CURRENCY MONOGRAMS

    12/18/2016

    Highlight: for silversmith Gabriel Lewyn, appears in Roman type at the upper left corner. This rare type was missing from the Boyd Collection. Noted with "Splits and Minor Damage; Tape Repairs on Back." The face is bright and the note maintains excellent eye appeal.

    Lot 901701 North Carolina April 2, 1776

    Money of Pre-Federal America: Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings No. 7

    /1992

    Highlight: Gabriel Lewyn of Baltimore, forgot for the moment that he was supposed to be cutting from right to left and was supposed to place the number and the letter in revers- ed order, even though he did remember to cut each of them in the proper mirror image. In the May 15, 1779 North Carolina issue, the top border cut con- tains the words “No Carolina Currency” in white script letters on © © © Twenty-Five Dollars. © © & to* -4* 7. S3 S3 S3 Ten Dollars.

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    Money of Pre-Federal America: Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings No. 7

    /1992

    Highlight: Uniformity of a denomination is desirable but Gabriel Lewyn, the Baltimore engraver, must have looked upon his assignment as an artistic challenge. His best known note is the $7. 50 denomination with an intermediate state of the American flag combining a British Union with 13 stripes, a compromise position as to the outcome of the American Revolution (fig. 21).

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    America's Money, America's Story

    /2008

    Highlight: So did Gabriel Lewyn and Thomas Sparrow of Maryland. And a South Carolina artist named Thomas Coram, who was not making much money on canvas, would turn to copper plates and make a good deal more, for a state rather than for himself. Such artisans did their bit for the war effort. And in a neat sharing of labor, many people better known in military capacity signed some of the state and national notes their artist friends were creating. For instance, Anthony Morris Jr. signed Continental Currency in 1775 and 1776, but he is more famous as a soldier (he final- ly died at the battle of Princeton in 1777); Tench Tilghman signed an issue of Continental Currency in 1776, but history knows him better as General Washington’s aide-de-camp, wherein he served in virtually every military action down t

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    America's Money, America's Story

    /2008

    Highlight: 208 Lewyn, Gabriel, 44 Lexington Green, 38 Libertas Americana medal, 67 Liberty Bell, 201 Liebler, T.A., 150 Liliuokalani, queen of Hawaii, 165 Lima, 8, 33, 76 Lincoln Memorial, 173, 200 Lincoln, Abraham, 99, 123, 124, 125, 126, 133, 142, 144, 145, 147, 149, 151, 157, 172,173,183, 200 Lindenmueller, Gustavus, 144 lion dollar, 1 1 Lisbon, 10 lithography, 126-128 log cabin, 16 London, 28, 37 Long Island, 21 Longacre, James Barton, 145, 171 Lord Baltimore, 26 Lotto, Lorenzo, 6 Louis XVI, king of France, 53 Louisiana, 90, 96 Louisiana Purchase, 115 Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 175 Lovett, Robert Jr., 125 Low Countries, 1 91 Lutheranism, 16 Machin, Thomas, 50, 52 Machin's Mills, 49, 50 MacNeil, Hermon, 189 Madison, Dolley, 205 Madison, James, 57 Magnolia (Florida), 90 Maine, 16, 95 Maine, USS

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    The Early Paper Money of America

    /2008

    Highlight: Charles NY 1734-37 Lewyn, Gabriel NC 1776 Loudon, Samuel NY 1776, 1786 Mandeville & Co. NY 1790 Mandeville & Westcott NY 1790 Massey, Joseph SC 1703, 1723; NY 1790 Maverick, Peter, R. NY 1786, 1788, 1799 Morse, Nathaniel CT 1733, MA 1736 Newmarch, Joseph NH 1759 Olipliant, James SC 1775 Parker, James NJ 1755-64; NY 1746-56 Power, Nicholas NY 1791 Purdie, Alexander VA 1776

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 17

    Highlight: These were printed from engraved copper plates ordered from and crafted by Baltimore silver and goldsmith Gabriel Lewyn. Some of the denomination’s border cuts are signed by him with his initials ‘GL’. These are 56 vignette types used on sixteen different denominations. The reason for the use of fifty-six different vignettes on the notes can only be conjectured at this point. As a series, they cer- tainly are reminiscent of the Georgia color seal notes from 1776 and 1777. All the notes were printed uniface on many different paper types from thin laid paper to very thick paper similar. The Ford-Boyd-Clarke-Chapman-Haseltine set of these notes included 52 of the 56 vignette types as were catalogued and sold in the Ford XV Sale. Included here are several duplicate notes from the collection.

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    Paper Money (September/October 1997)

    1/9/1997

    Highlight: Gabriel Lewyn. The designs of these notes included a potpourri of symbols; alligators, beetles, lions, squirrels and owls among them. These notes also included monograms, a vase of flowers, hunter, dog and target, and that first unofficial American flag. The design of this $7'/2 note from North Carolina is unique in this re- spect. It reminds of what our predecessors accepted as "their" banner, and the need to identify and partially separate them- selves from Great Britain. They held on to the Union lack that occupied the space of the future blue field of stars. When Francis Hopkinson's design of stars and stripes was accepted, those early Americans stated their intentions to be independent and free. In closing allow me to return to last month's brief reference to Haiti. We have our Betsy

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