Skip to content

NNP Library //Library Search

46 records found.

    Page 1 of 1

    logan and mccloskey

    John Reich Journal, July 2001

    1/7/2001

    Highlight: t to the discussion of the 1833 B1 rusted dies, Philadelphia appears to have been an extremely wet place in October of 1833. These wet conditions may be responsible for the extreme rusting observed on the B 1 variety and the October timing of the event may give us a clue to the dates of production of the unrusted and rusted die states. Timing of the 1833 Quarter Production Davis et al. (1984) and logan and mccloskey (1998) have noted that the mint was in a state of disarray in 1833 with apparent random remarriages of dies for the 1833 dime and half dime production. As well, many of the 1833 dies were used in 1834 and possibly later. Davis et al. (1984) showed that the TED higher marriages of 1833 (JR7, 9 and 10) were minted after the rare 1834 JR3 dime. More recently, Sherrill ( 1998) has shown that the TED

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, December 2006

    1/12/2006

    Highlight: . Valentine noted “die breaks are listed as sub-varieties, being accidents, and are of interest as they are the later impressions of a particular die, as well as evidence of identity of dies found on more than one specimen.” Valentine did not specifically use the term die remarriage; instead, it appears that he labeled what we now call remarriages as later die states of a particular die marriage. logan and mccloskey formally introduced the concept of die remarriages in Federal Half Dimes 1792-1837 as a result of conclusive determination of the emission sequence (the order in which each die marriage and die remarriage was minted) of CBHD. According to Logan and McCloskey, a die remarriage occurs if the same obverse-reverse die pair is reunited in the screw press after either of the dies was used to strike ano

    Read more

    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: lues and violets of the periphery, while the reverse is mostly brilliant with a faint overlay of champagne and just a hint of pastel blue. The strike is typical of the date, a bit soft on the ear curl and juncture of the eagle’s wing and the upper left corner of the shield, but the vast majority of details are precisely defined. No notable contact points are seen. The die state is as described by logan and mccloskey. This specimen is the piece singled out in the Logan and McCloskey description of the LM-1 variety, which noted “a number of high grade examples of this die marriage have surfaced over the years. The Eliasberg specimen was described as MS-66 in the Bowers and Merena auction, 5/96:922.” This may be the finest example known of this die variety, one that was unknown to Valentine and first described

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, December 2006

    1/12/2006

    Highlight: se and reverse dies used for every known die marriage and die remarriage in the CBHD series. In a sense, the photos and die state descriptions have unintentionally reduced the collective ability of CBHD enthusiasts to properly attribute die remarriages. Collectors are likely inclined to attempt to attribute a die remarriage merely by study of the photographs and die state descriptions provided by logan and mccloskey, rather than by taking a few additional and very necessary steps if they are to make correct attributions. In order to correctly attribute a die remarriage, collectors should become familiar with “Die State Descriptions” (page 52 of Federal Half Dimes 1792-1837 ). “Emission Order” for CBHD (pages 62-64), and the “Remarriage Charts” that begin on page 65. Logan and McCloskey emphasize use of exact

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, December 2006

    1/12/2006

    Highlight: es. The flow charts include descriptions of the key or diagnostic die defects that occurred at each point in time of the die’s life. When using the die remarriage charts to assist with attribution, collectors must remember that all of the previously noted die deterioration attributes (on the flow chart) for a specific die marriage should be plainly visible on the coin in question. Jn other words, logan and mccloskey were telling us that that a CBHD can’t be correctly attributed as a later die remarriage unless all of the characteristics present on the reverse of the coin for prior die marriages and remarriages that used that same reverse are also present on the coin in question. A simple example of application of the die remarriage charts is the reverse CC deterioration chart. Recall that I referred to rever

    Read more

    The Asylum, January-March 2009

    1/1/2009

    Highlight: 23 The Hundred Greatest, Part 1 in business by 1914, when he exhibited a group of half dimes at the ANS (see #86). Seventeen years later this ANS monograph, number 48 in that series, covered die varieties of early, bust, and seated half dimes. Although super- seded by Logan and McCloskey’s Federal Half Dimes ( 1 18th in our survey) for early and bust varieties, Valentine remains a core reference flogan and mccloskey’s Federal Half Dimes ( 1 18th in our survey) for early and bust varieties, Valentine remains a core reference for the seated half dime collector. Valentine’s personal collection, nearly eighty years since his death, remains a great numismatic mystery. Despite the 47 collotypes included here, the noted half dime variety hunter Stephen Crain has matched but three specimens to the Valentine plates,

    Read more

    DAVID J. DAVIS, 1938-2011

    11/06/2011

    Highlight: When the Logan/McCloskey half dime reference was being written and researched, David volunteered to retrace the 1883 research of Harold P. Newlin ("A Classification of the Early Half Dimes of the United States"), researching the auction appearances of the 1802 half dime. Newlin accounted for sixteen confirmed examples in 1883, and it was widely believed that the number had increased to approximately twice that figure by 1998, when the half dime reference was written. I spoke with David after his research had been completed, but before the half dime book was published, and asked him how many 1802 half dimes had been accounted for. I will never forget his fascinating response, when he replied, "Do you mean real ones?" He told of being the bearer of bad news when he identified that the 1802

    Past NBS President Michael J. Sullivan submitted the following report. Sorry to hear the news! We'v

    Read more

    The Asylum, January-March 2009

    1/1/2009

    Highlight: 23 The Hundred Greatest, Part 1 in business by 1914, when he exhibited a group of half dimes at the ANS (see #86). Seventeen years later this ANS monograph, number 48 in that series, covered die varieties of early, bust, and seated half dimes. Although super- seded by Logan and McCloskey’s Federal Half Dimes ( 1 18th in our survey) for early and bust varieties, Valentine remains a core reference flogan and mccloskey’s Federal Half Dimes ( 1 18th in our survey) for early and bust varieties, Valentine remains a core reference for the seated half dime collector. Valentine’s personal collection, nearly eighty years since his death, remains a great numismatic mystery. Despite the 47 collotypes included here, the noted half dime variety hunter Stephen Crain has matched but three specimens to the Valentine plates,

    Read more

    America's Silver Coinage 1794-1891: Coinage of the Americas Conference Proceedings No. 3

    /1987

    Articles on American silver coinage through the Liberty Seated period, including works by Logan, Lov

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, July 2001

    1/7/2001

    Highlight: 1833 RUSTED DIE QUARTERS: A POSSIBLE LINK TO C LIMATE Philadelphia Mint with evidence of rusting. However they do exist in several denominations. Logan and McCloskey (1998) note that, despite the fact that wax was used as a rust preventative when dies were in storage, several half dime dies of the period became severely rusted. These half dimes include the 1829 LM 18 Reverse M die, which is marrielogan and mccloskey (1998) note that, despite the fact that wax was used as a rust preventative when dies were in storage, several half dime dies of the period became severely rusted. These half dimes include the 1829 LM 18 Reverse M die, which is married with obverse dies from 1830, 1831 and 1832, and the 1834 LM3 Obverse 1 die. Among the quarters, Breen (1992) notes die rust on 1831 B4 reverse die, and the 1833 Bl

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, February 2005

    1/2/2005

    Highlight: 837". By default, it must he e.xtreme- ly rare, as the authors have not been able to locate a single example of the 1835 LM-5.2 with the reverse cud. The coin pictured is "pre-cud", with some of the defining die cracks beginning to appear. For each of the die marriages illustrated and discussed herein, and for the convenience ot collectors, we have made reference to the numbering sequence used by logan and mccloskey, in their “Federal Half Dimes 1792 - 1837”, as well as the earlier Valentine num- bering sequence, from “The United States Half Dimes”, by Daniel W. Valentine. Figure 23. 1835 LM-9.2/V6 develops a "retained cud" through TED of UNITED, and a second, adjoining, retained cud at STATE. It is considerably rarer than the 1836 LM-1.2, with a later version of the same "cud". All photographs were taken by

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, June 2010

    1/6/2010

    Highlight: this coin using Photoshop shows that an expansion has already started: The brockage image is about 1.5% larger than the design elements on the other side. There is a ver> slight partial collar strike, with the unstruck portion on the side with the brockage. The expanded previous strike may have started to interfere with the nonnal placement of the collar. That seems especially likely considering logan and mccloskey document that the obverse die approached with 0.003-0.005 inches (0.08-1.2 mm) of the collar even in normal circumstances. 10

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, June 2010

    1/6/2010

    Highlight: Half Dime Brockage Because of the brockage strike, this coin is undated. Reverse P was used to produce 1831 LM-6, 1832 LM-6, 1833 LM-5, 1833 LM-10, and 1835 LM-1. A 96-reed collar eliminates the last two possibilities. Logan and McCloskey describe four features that differentiate the reverse of 1832 LM-6 from 1831 LM-6: 1) Die crack forms along base of UNI to left edge of scroll. 2) Die crack formlogan and mccloskey describe four features that differentiate the reverse of 1832 LM-6 from 1831 LM-6: 1) Die crack forms along base of UNI to left edge of scroll. 2) Die crack forms from dentils through A 1 to scroll ovrer R. 3) Die crack forms from dentils to top of T3 4) Die crack forms from lower loop of S2 to center of O Of those features, this specimen exhibits only the third, a die crack from the dentils to t

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, February 2011

    1/2/2011

    Highlight: Capped Bust Half Dime Cud Rarity, a Specialist’s Opinion 3. I recognize that Logan and McCloskey, in Federal Half Dimes 1792-1837, did not assign rarity ratings to specific die remarriages - instead they lumped all examples of a die remarriage into one rarity rating for the entire die marriage. 4. For sake of consistency, I will accept the categorization of “internal cuds” (as used by Crain and Pelogan and mccloskey, in Federal Half Dimes 1792-1837, did not assign rarity ratings to specific die remarriages - instead they lumped all examples of a die remarriage into one rarity rating for the entire die marriage. 4. For sake of consistency, I will accept the categorization of “internal cuds” (as used by Crain and Peterson) as cuds worthy of consideration for this article. Many purists state that a cud must inv

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, August 2012

    1/8/2012

    Highlight: Since most collectors use (or should use ) the die remarriage charts found on pages 65-77 in the Logan-McCloskey text, I decided to present my recommended die markers in a fashion similar to that used by the authors. I have created a new die remarriage chart for Reverse G that collectors might consider using when assessing a coin and attempting to determine the correct die remarriage. An explanation of the changes to the die remarriage chart is below the chart. 5

    Read more

    John Reich Journal, August 2012

    1/8/2012

    Highlight: ie deterioration occurred. Multiple cuds can be found on examples of this die remarriage. In closing, I want to offer a few words about using this (or any other) die remarriage chart and illustrate use of the chart for Capped Bust Half Dimes that use Reverse G. In my article "Understanding Capped Bust Half Dime Die Remarriages" in the December 2006 John Reich Journal . I paraphrased the authors' (logan and mccloskey) most important "rule" in determination of a specific coin's die remarriage attribution using the die remarriage charts: "Collectors must remember that all of the previously noted die deterioration attributes (shown on the flow charts) for a specific die remarriage should be plainly visible on the coin in question." 6

    Read more

    The August 2012 Philadelphia ANA Auction, United States Coinage

    Highlight: e lapping apparent on the lower left reverse with the upper olive leaves missing any trace of their stem. Although mentioned in the Dime refer- ence that the JR-1 variety was struck both before and after the JR-3 variety using this same reverse die, the frequency of these die remarriages in the 1 820s and 1 830s really came to light when the Capped Bust half dime series was extensively studied by logan and mccloskey in their 1998 reference on that series. Extensive obverse rim crumbling around stars four to seven, one area of crumbling touches the outer point of star five. Moderate die crack arcs through the lower right reverse arrowheads and C. The reverse die was rotated about 30 degrees clockwise when struck. PCGS# 38807. From the David J. Davis Collection. This is the Plate Coin on page 127 of the Dime r

    Read more

    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: binets of our oldest collectors. ’’ — Montroville W. Dickeson, 1859 Another high grade and colorful example of this first date in the Flowing Hair series. Nearly brilliant centers radiate outward into concentric rings of amber-gold, violet-blue, and champagne. The cartwheel is excellent on both sides, and the entire coin has a lustrous, lively appearance. The usual thin die crack, as described by logan and mccloskey, is present on the obverse, across the lowest tip of star 6, across the crown of Liberty’s head through the E of LIBERTY on a diagonal path to the rim. The reverse is likewise cracked, boldly from the eagle’s tail across the wreath through the upright of R in AMERICA, more delicately from the same point straight down through the right wreath end to the rim. The strike is above average, with some

    Read more

    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: isible in some areas, most notable near 3:00 on the obverse. This extraordinary detail is made all the more impressive by the state of the dies, now twice clashed, with the clash marks visible all over obverse and reverse. A network of fine obverse cracks have evolved as well. The one from the rim across the two lower points of star 6 is the most notable, stretching to the ribbons as described by logan and mccloskey. Other smaller ones are visible too: below star 1 to the lowest curl, above star 1, above star 4 downward on a diagonal to the hair. The reverse is also clashed and cracked, with a large break at the foot of the first T in STATES, stretching above to the rim and below to behind the eagle’s head. Smaller cracks are seen from the base of the second S in STATES to the leaf below, below the wing of t

    Read more

    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: Holmes sale) and the Logan-McCloskey plate coin show the break at the bust truncation; this does not. Full of eye appeal and, like most everything else in the D. Brent Pogue Collection, essentially impossible to improve upon. Called the “Finest Known of the Ex. Rare 1803 Small Date” by Walter Breen in 1968, Breen described this piece in Lester Merkin’s sale of September of that year as “Perfect die. (Borderline R-7.) Borderline Unc., slightly finer than the 1801. Pastel rainbow tone and mint lustre, exceptional sharpness especially on curls, only one star above eagle’s head weak, everything else bold save part of drapery A variety of small bag marks. Almost unobtainable above Good; the Eliasb erg, Valentine, and WGC examples are the only other fine ones known. The present coin is not only

    Read more

    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: Beautiful Gem 1831 Half Dime LM-6 (2x photo) Lot 1021. 1831 Logan McCloskey-6. Rarity-1. Mint State-67 (PCGS). A connoisseur quality half dime of 1831. Sedately beautiful frosty surfaces show opalescent gold with hints of palest violet and faintest blue. A finely struck gem, minutely detailed despite evidence of a clash mark and a scattering of infinitesimal reverse die cracks, each described by logan and mccloskey in exacting fashion. The eye appeal is connoisseur quality and the preservation is equal to the grade. with only a single tiny contact point on the cheek seen under scrutiny. One of the very finest survivors of this date and variety. PCGS Population: 10, 1 finer (MS-68). Provenance: Pinnacle Rarities, by sale, at the American Numismatic Association Convention, fuly 2003. Est. $10,000-$15,000 STAC

    Read more

    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: The D. Brent Pogue Collection Part I — Half Dimes Entirely Satisfying Gem 1836 LM-5 Half Dime Single Finest Certified at PCGS (2x photo) Lot 1032. 1836 Logan McCloskey-5. Rarity-2. Small 5C. Mint State-67+ (PCGS). Perhaps the single finest known example. When Logan and McCloskey suggested that “Mint State examples are readily available,” they didn’t mean ultra-gem examples like this! Magnified scrlogan and mccloskey suggested that “Mint State examples are readily available,” they didn’t mean ultra-gem examples like this! Magnified scrutiny reveals near perfection, surfaces delicately toned in gold, entirely covered in luster and exceptionally beautiful. The obverse clash marks are easily seen between drapery and lowest curl, and the reverse clash marks are just as crisp. Attempts to repair the die have lappe

    Read more

    The February 2014 Americana Auction

    Highlight: n today that can compare favorably with this stellar coin. Make sure to enjoy its features before the auction, as you will want to raise your bid accordingly, in order to secure it when the hammer falls. PCGS# 4251. PCGS Population: 25; 18 finer (Mint State-67 finest). Choice Mint State 1800 Half Dime 2043 1800 LM-1. Rarity-3. MS-63 (PCGS). Struck from the latest state of the dies as described by logan and mccloskey (1998), the most significant feature is a sizable obverse die break in the denticles below the digits 00 in the date. This delightful piece has full satin luster and both sides display a blend of warm sandy-gold, pale rose and medium gray patina. Sharply defined from a well centered strike. 1800 saw the start of the new Heraldic Eagle design for the reverse. The immediately prior issues of 1797 a

    Read more

    The August 2014 Chicago ANA Auction Rarities Night

    Highlight: estimate a Proof population of between just 20 and 30 specimens. Although Proofs from the LM-2 dies appear to be offered most frequently. Proofs from other die combinations have also been recognized by specialists: LM-1 (per certification services); LM-3 (per certification services); LM-4 (per Walter Breen, who considered the Eliasberg coin to be a Proof); LM-5 (also per Walter Breen); LM-13 (per logan and mccloskey); LM-15 (per Walter Breen); and LM-16 (per Walter Breen). Specialists’ opinions regarding the status of some 1829 half dimes have varied over the years, however, and the number of Proofs recognized today is almost certainly less than could be inferred from studying auction listings from several decades ago. In fact, no more than a dozen Proofs from just the LM-2 dies are currently thought to exis

    Read more

    United States Silver and Copper Coins: The Buffalo and Erie Historical Society; The Laurence H. Gardner Collection

    Highlight: FLOWING HAIR HALF DIMES HIGH GRADE 1794 WIDE DATE HALF DIME 612 1794 Logan-McCloskey 1 (R-6). Wide Date. Extremely Fine. This sharply detailed example of the first regular date of Half Dime coinage hoasts gorgeous hulls-eye toning surrounded hy hands of orange-gold, deep rose, blue and lilac. This distinctive variety shows the first star held pincer-like between two curls, the second star point joined firmly to curl 3, re- verse wreath has no outside berries. The highest grade noted by Logan and McCloskey in their definitive Federal Half Dimes, 1792-1837 was About Uncirculated. HANDSOME 1795 LOW ‘L’ HALF DIME 613 1795 LM-8 (R-3). Star 1 between Curls 2-3, Low ‘L’ in LIBERTY. About Uncirculated or thereabouts. Spacing of motto shows as ‘L I BERTY’. Here is an early die state, without the

    Read more

    70th Anniversary Sale of United States Coins and Currency

    Highlight: 1885 1885 1795 Logan McCloskey 10 (R-3). Stars Touch Curl & Bust. About Uncirculated and essentially Choice. First star touches two curls, star 15 joins bust point. A lovely strike results in exacting de- tail though an area around the lowest curls shows striking weakness from uneven planchet surface. U. S. DRAPED BUST, SMALL EAGLE REVERSE HALF DIMES GLORIOUS 1796 LIKERTY HALF DIME Lot No. 1886 1886 1796 LM-1 (R-3). LIKERTY. Choice About Uncircu- lated and on the cusp of Mint State. Broken ‘B’ in LIB- ERTY provides this famous variety with its ancient nickname. As Logan and McCloskey observe in their Federal Half Dimes, this variety is usually found well worn, making such high grade pieces as the present coin true rarities. This coin’s strike is exacting and its silver surfaces are bathed

    Read more

    United States Gold, Silver and Copper Coins: Featuring Selections from the Collection of Harold Nelson, and Others

    Highlight: 160 160 1794 Logan-McCloskey 2 (R-5). Brilliant Uncirculated and approaching the Choice category. Evenly struck and free of any impairments that even begin to require special mention. Satin-like underlying fields and design elements are awash in a wonderfully balanced blend of iridescent lavender-gray toning. It goes without sa3dng that Mint State exam- ples of this date are both quite rare and of great importance. In fact, even heavily circulated specimens of this first year of type and denomination warrant substantial premiums above similarly graded Half Dimes of 1795. Lot No. 161 161 1795 LM-8 (R-3) About Very Fine. Here is a pleasing steel gray example with some ice blue toning. The sur- faces are smooth and trouble-free. All details are plainly visible including the die break which

    Read more

    The May Sale: United States Coins and Paper Money, Including the Extremely Rare 1854 'S' Quarter Eagle

    Highlight: orms from the rim to Liberty’s cap, later extending down through the ‘E’ of LIBERTY to the rim left of the ‘6’. Of particular importance to the die variety specialist is that the LM.1.1 die marriage is one of the most difficult to ob- tain in the entire series, with a mere four examples reported in the most recent John Reich Journal in the Half Dime Census published in December 2005. NGC MS64. In logan and mccloskey’s Federal Half Dimes 1792-1837 they discuss this remarkable reverse die on page 77. This reverse die was first used to coin 1835 LM.7 Half Dimes, then later was used to coin Half Dimes from 1836, then reused again to make more 1835 Half Dimes. In all a total of four different obverses were paired with this reverse, and over the span of its life a total of seven remarriages have been confirmed. Fu

    Read more

    The Classics Sale: The Haig A. Koshkarian Collection

    Highlight: nd details on his head are complete. A very choice coin for the grade with the eye appeal of a full Mint State coin. A curved lint mark inside star 8 identifies this coin as the plate piece in the standard w'ork on early half dimes by Russell Logan and John McCloskey, a short scratch under star 7 and a planchet roUer mark under star 6 are noted for accuracy. A very rare variety, rated full R-6 by logan and mccloskey and rarely encountered in any grade. When specimens do enter the marketplace, they are likely to be well worn — reading over the list of specimens sold m the last several years in Jeff Garrett and John Dannreuther’s book on auction records finds most citations for coins that are heavily worn, bent, or corroded. Indeed, the only one comparable is the only finer specimen in existence — the Neill-Ba

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

    Read more

    The Pevehouse & Davis Collections

    Highlight: at the star below A ofSTATES. While not fully detailed at centers, the detail is better than usual for this grade, and there is only modest weak- ness in some areas near the upper right corner of the shield verti- cals. Despite the arc of damage to the obverse die, this specimen is struck from a relatively early die state for the variety, before the lapping and later cuds and cracks described by logan and mccloskey. As early half dime specialists know, finding a nice 1801 half dime can be a serious challenge, though we expect that many bidders will find this specimen highly satisfying. Gorgeous Gem 1830 Half Dime Possible CC for Variety 260 1830 LM-12, V-ll. Rarity-4. MS-66 (PCGS). A simply gor- geous specimen of this elusive die marriage, almost certainly one of the very finest known for the variety. Stunn

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

    Read more

    The Oliver Jung Collection

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

    Read more

    THE ELIASBERG 1802 HALF DIME

    11/27/2016

    Highlight: 02 half dimes that have survived to the present day. Walter Breen, in his 1988 Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins, cites coin dealer James G. MacAllister who in 1935 claimed "he could trace 35, mostly in the Poor to VG range." Breen goes on to say: "Nobody has attempted a more recent comprehensive head count, but the probable number is somewhere between 35 and 45." logan and mccloskey (1998), on the other hand, are doubtful of Breen's estimate. Their contention is that "not more than 35 genuine specimens of this date could be traced today." The emphasis that these authors place on genuine examples is significant, opining that "modern numismatists are cognizant of counterfeit pieces made during the 19th century by altering the date of other Heraldic Eagle hal

    The November 22, 2016 Heritage Coin News has an article about the Eliasberg

    Read more

    DAVID J. DAVIS, 1938-2011

    11/06/2011

    Highlight: When the Logan/McCloskey half dime reference was being written and researched, David volunteered to retrace the 1883 research of Harold P. Newlin ("A Classification of the Early Half Dimes of the United States"), researching the auction appearances of the 1802 half dime.

    Newlin accounted for sixteen confirmed examples in 1883, and it was widely believed that the number had increased to approximately twice that figure by 1998, when the half dime reference was written. I spoke with David after his research had been completed, but before the half dime book was published, and asked him how many 1802 half dimes had been accounted for.

    I will never forget his fascinating response, when he replied, "Do you mean real ones?" He told of being the bearer of bad news when he identifie

      Page 1 of 1
      NNP is 100% non-profit and independent // Your feedback is essential and welcome. // Your feedback is essential and welcome.

      Contact Us

      • NNPCurator@wustl.edu

      • c/o Washington University Libraries
        One Brookings Drive
        Campus Box 1061
        St. Louis, MO 63130

      About Us

      The Newman Numismatic Portal is located at Washington University in St. Louis and funded by the Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society. The NNP is dedicated to becoming the primary and most comprehensive resource for numismatic research and reference material, initially concentrating on U.S. Coinage and Currency. Contact us with suggestions and corrections.

      Find out more

      Copyright 2017 © EPNNES & Washington University in St. Louis