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    LORD ST. OSWALD 1794 DOLLAR OFFERED

    05/07/2017

    Highlight: LORD ST. OSWALD 1794 DOLLAR OFFERED http://www.coinbooks.org/v20/esylum_v20n19a18.html

    Lord St. Oswald-Norweb 1794 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar"><b style=Lord St. Oswald-Norweb 1794 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar" />

    Bibliophiles will appreciate the significance of the pictured auction catalogs, which document the provenance of this legendary coin. A marvelous high-grade example set aside shortly after its striking, it's a prize for any

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part V

    Highlight: Brent Pogue Collection Part V — Large Cents The Finest Known 1794 Sheldon-57 Cent A Lord St. Oswald Gem Lot 5098. 1794 Sheldon-57. Head of 1794. Rarity-1. Mint State-65 RB (PCGS). ‘‘Anyone interested in 1194 large cents, 1795 half dollars, 1794 dollars, or the history of the First United States Mint probably thinks he already knows who St. Oswald was. ” — Michael Hodder, “Who Was Major The Lord St. Oswald?” The Asylum, 1994 Mint color frames peripheries and devices, contrasting slightly with the mellowed fields and devices. The surfaces retain strong luster and appear very glossy on both sides. The color on the portrait is somewhat uneven, but the reverse is more finely blended and more abundantly red. No post-striking marks of any significance are seen on either side, leaving the fields

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    WILLIAM STRICKLAND'S 1794-1795 TRIP TO AMERICA

    09/13/2015

    Highlight: also named Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. (or Sir Rowland Winn), had acquired the coins at the Philadelphia Mint in the years of manufacture and that they had descended in the family found general, unquestioned, acceptance.

    In 1994, an article dismissed this hypothesis. It noted that there was no “Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C.” in 1794-1795 (the title didn’t exist until 1885 nor, until 1914, did the military decoration, M.C. [Military Cross]). The article posited (based on correspondence with the then Lord St. Oswald [family name, Winn]) that no member of the Winn family had visited the United States in the 18th century, and that “It now appears certain the United States coins in the 1964 sale were not obtained directly from the Mint by a St. Oswald [Winn] family

    WILLIAM STRICKLAND'S 1794-1795 TRIP TO AM

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    WILLIAM STRICKLAND'S 1794-1795 TRIP TO AMERICA

    09/13/2015

    Highlight: also named Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. (or Sir Rowland Winn), had acquired the coins at the Philadelphia Mint in the years of manufacture and that they had descended in the family found general, unquestioned, acceptance.

    In 1994, an article dismissed this hypothesis. It noted that there was no “Major the Lord St. Oswald.” in 1794-1795 (the title didn’t exist until 1885 nor, until 1914, did the military decoration, M.C. [Military Cross]). The article posited (based on correspondence with the then Lord St. Oswald [family name, Winn]) that no member of the Winn family had visited the United States in the 18th century, and that “It now appears certain the United States coins in the 1964 sale were not

    A great article by David Tripp has b

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: States coins were the financial highlight of the event!" Walter Breen quickly concluded that some of the pieces may have been struck specifically for the visit of Lord St. Oswaldwere presentation pieces in Walter’s mind, he needed a reason for them to be presented and someone to present them to. The visit of a British Nobleman certainly fit the bill, and without any further research, Breen - and pretty much everyone after for the next few decades - closed the case, making any Lord St. Oswald pedigree immediately the oldest and most important one that a collector in this country could hope to acquire (indeed, one of the 1794 large cents, Sheldon 67, was late

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 26, No. 6(153)

    15/11/1992

    Highlight: MORE LORD ST. OSWALD EARLY C0PPER--28 YEARS LATER! Alan V. Weinberg Following my interview with Eric Strelner at the ANA In Orlando, I endeavored to obtain a copy of the February 18, 1992 Christie's auction catalogue, since that sale had included my 1793 S-2 Chain cent, as well as two 1794 half cents in mint state, among other U.S. copper rarities. I was told that it would be difficult to obtain a "since-sold" Christie's London catalogue, but nothing could have been further from the truth. I simply called Christie's Long Island, New York publications office, (718) 784-1480, and within four days received the catalogue and prices realized by first-class mail. This sale's incredible offerings of early American copper went largely unnoticed by the early copper collecting fraternity. Indeed, th

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: States coins were the financial highlight of the event!" Walter Breen quickly concluded that some of the pieces may have been struck specifically for the visit of Lord St. Oswaldwere presentation pieces in Walter’s mind, he needed a reason for them to be presented and someone to present them to. The visit of a British Nobleman certainly fit the bill, and without any further research, Breen - and pretty much everyone after for the next few decades - closed the case, making any Lord St. Oswald pedigree immediately the oldest and most important one that a collector in this country could hope to acquire (indeed, one of the 1794 large cents, Sheldon 67, was late

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 26, No. 6(153)

    15/11/1992

    Highlight: MORE LORD ST. OSWALD EARLY C0PPER--28 YEARS LATER! Alan V. Weinberg Following my interview with Eric Strelner at the ANA In Orlando, I endeavored to obtain a copy of the February 18, 1992 Christie's auction catalogue, since that sale had included my 1793 S-2 Chain cent, as well as two 1794 half cents in mint state, among other U.S. copper rarities. I was told that it would be difficult to obtain a "since-sold" Christie's London catalogue, but nothing could have been further from the truth. I simply called Christie's Long Island, New York publications office, (718) 784-1480, and within four days received the catalogue and prices realized by first-class mail. This sale's incredible offerings of early American copper went largely unnoticed by the early copper collecting fraternity. Indeed, th

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part V

    Highlight: Brent Pogue Collection Part V — Large Cents Superb Gem Lord St. Oswald 1794 Sheldon-69 Probably Acquired in Lot 5099. 1794 Sheldon-69. Head of 1795. Rarity- ^^The Lord St. Oswald pedigree is one of the most legendary in all of numismatics. The name is associated with quality, particularly with reference to early American coins. — Ron Guth, ‘^The Lord St. Oswald Coins - Where Are They Now?” LOGS Blog, October 12,2015 A glowing red gem, this cent shows resplendent cartwheel luster and original mint color that has barely mellowed in the two centuries since it was struck. Its surfaces are fresh and lively, frosty and full of mint bloom. The surfaces have mellowed equally all over, leaving none of this coin brown despite its RB designation. The fields are perhaps best described as a sedate rose

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part II

    Highlight: Though the name “Lord St. Oswald was named William Strickland. David Tripp has uncovered and reanimated Strickland’s extraordinary visit to the United States, which lasted from September 20, 1794, until July 29, 1795. Strickland was a collector of many things, including coins, and he appears to have gathered a sensible and organized grouping of American coins during his 10-month visit. The coins from the Lord St. Oswald / Strickland collection span the breadth of the Philadelphia Mint’s production until the time of Strickland’s departure from Philadelphia at the end of July 1795, ranging from half cents to dollars, from a lightly worn Chain cent to perfect gem coins struck in the weeks before hi

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part II

    Highlight: 1795 Silver Plug Dollar Extant The Lord St. Oswaldhn Sinclair, July 10, 1795 A coin of great native beauty, like a tropical island or a mountain glen, natural and unsophisticated, showing no evidence of trespass from humans for centuries. The story of this coin’s provenance, long the stuff of legend, has now been brought into the realm of the factual by David Tripp, lending even greater meaning and romance to the Lord St. Oswald name. This coin, when acquired by Willia

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Part III

    Highlight: Brent Pogue Collection Part III this date that bear the Lord St. Oswald name, the quality and provenance is inseparable. Unlike most of the coins gathered during William Strickland’s 10-month sojourn in the United States in 1794 and 1795, this coin was not sold in the October 1964 Christie’s sale that made “Lord St. Oswald” the most desirable provenance in American numismatics. This coin remained with the Winn family, reposing within the splendid Chippendale coin and medal cabinet at Nostell Priory until it was sold by Christie’s in February 1992, beneath an unprepossessing headline that read “The Property of a Gentleman / Coins removed from Nostell Priory, Wakefield, Yorkshire” in an otherwise unremarkable 513-lot London coin auction. This half cent was joined by a high grade but not quit

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: States coins were the financial highlight of the event!" Walter Breen quickly concluded that some of the pieces may have been struck specifically for the visit of Lord St. Oswaldwere presentation pieces in Walter’s mind, he needed a reason for them to be presented and someone to present them to. The visit of a British Nobleman certainly fit the bill, and without any further research, Breen - and pretty much everyone after for the next few decades - closed the case, making any Lord St. Oswald pedigree immediately the oldest and most important one that a collector in this country could hope to acquire (indeed, one of the 1794 large cents, Sheldon 67, was late

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    The Asylum, Early Summer 1996

    1/6/1996

    Highlight: he offers two "Lord St. Oswald" 1794 cents, with the following commentary: "In 1794, Lord St. Oswald made his way from En- gland to the newly-formed mint to purchase some coins for his collection... As a serious collector, only an outstanding example would do." Readers of The Asylum know that this is a serious historical error, for Michael Hodder proved in the Fall 1994 issue that Lord St. Oswald was not bom until 1916. While The Asylum might be somewhat esoteric reading for the average coin dealer, one might have thought that such folk would at least read the Guide Book. If so, Mr. Parrino would not have made the following statement in the same ad, this time while trying to sell a 1793 Chain Ameri cent: "It was the very first federally-issued coin minted for the United States, the very

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    Public Auction Sale: United States Coins featuring the Robert J. Kissner Collection of U.S. Large Cents with other important consignments

    Highlight: the Lord St. Oswald 1794 cents sold in Eng- land have altered the Condition Census to some degree. PLATE 258 1794 S-60, H-35. Thick Hair, close date. The Square Forelock. Maris' "Pata- gonian" obverse. The Edgewise Leaf reverse. Rarity 4. Extremely Fine-40. A glossy medium brown. From the W. E. Johnson Collection. (This variety was also in the Lord St. Oswald discovery.) PLATE 259 1794 S-60, H-35. A duplicate. Very Fine-30, with some barely noticeable tooling above' the head just touching the hair. A really lovely medium brown cent. 260 1794 S-61, H-36. Thick Hair, close date. Short right stem on the reverse. Rarity 4. Extremely Fine-40. The obverse much stronger than the reverse, reddish- brown. From our 1959 Metropolitan N.Y. Numismatic Convention sale. (An- other variety which was in th

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    The Magnifiecent Herman Halpern Collection of United States Large Cents

    Highlight: From the renowned Lord St. Oswald hoard sold in England in 1964. A sensational coin which will easily command a bid in the middle four figure range.” The red has mellowed a bit since then, but the coin is still outstanding and may well bring a bid in the $15,000 to $20,000 range. (SEE COLOR PLATE) Acquired at the Philadelphia Mint in October, 1795, by Sir Rowland Winn (later Major the Lord St. Oswald), retained by his descendants until it was consigned to Christie, Manson & Woods and sold in the Lord St. Oswald Sale as lot 165. It was purchased by Stack’s and sold to E. Yale Clarke, reappearing as lot 43 of our October 25, 1975 Sale. Its later pedigree includes Gordon Wrubel; Dr. Robert Shalowitz; Robert Emmer; Del Bland; Tom Morley; John W. Adams. It appeared as lot 20 in the New England

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part I

    Highlight: Brent Pogue Collection Part I — Half Dollars The Lord St. Oswald 1795 Small Head Half Dollar The Only Mint State Survivor Legendary Provenance Lot 1099. 1795 Overton-126a. Rarity-4+. Small ‘^Usually in low grades, prohibitively rare in VF /’ — Walter Breen A distinctive type among the Flowing Hair halves, showing a smaller, finer portrait bust of Liberty. Only three obverse dies among the 19 used in 1795 utilized this head puncheon, combining with two different reverses to make three total die marriages. All of those die marriages are scarce in any grade, and all are extremely rare in high grade. This is the only known Mint State coin, and what a lovely one it is. Cartwheel luster encircles frosty, original surfaces. The obverse is golden gray, even at arm’s length, but shows a range of

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part V

    Highlight: Brent Pogue Collection Part V — Large Cents The Finest Known 1794 Sheldon-71 Cent From the Lord St. Oswald Collection Lot 5100. 1794 Sheldon-71. Head of 1795. Rarity-2. Mint State-65 RB (PCGS). M great quantity of copper still remains on hand, part not yet refined. This will occasionally be wrought, so as not to interfere with the silver coinage. ” — David Rittenhouse to George Washington, October 28, 1794 Cartwheel luster brings original mint color to the fore as it spins around both sides, locating and enlivening the abundant red that remains, somewhat sublimated and mellowed to steel and chocolate brown away from light and luster. Spectacularly well defined from denticles to center on both sides, the portrait of Liberty rises like an island from the even and smooth fields that surround

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    The August 2014 Chicago ANA Auction Rarities Night

    Highlight: Amazing Specimen 1795 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar Ex: The Lord St. Oswald Collection 13114 1795 Flowing Hair. BB-20, B-2. Rarity-3. BB Die State 11. Two Leaves. Specimen-64 (NGC). Boldly defined borders frame equally well-defined devices on both sides of this remarkable Flowing Hair dollar. Expertly preserved, as well, the brightly reflective surfaces are adorned in delicate silver-olive iridescence that is a bit more pronounced on the obverse. Just two examples of this date have been deemed “ Specimen” by NGC for the Flowing Hair type offered here; two pieces called “Specimen” are also listed by that firm for the Draped Bust silver dollars of the date. The present beauty stands apart from the Mint State examples of the date currently known by virtue of its “special” appearance and the

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part II

    Highlight: also named Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C. (or Sir Rowland Winn), had acquired the coins at the Philadelphia Mint in the years of manufacture and that they had descended in the family found general, unquestioned, acceptance. In 1994, an article dismissed this hypothesis. It noted that there was no “Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C.” in 1794-1795 (the title didn’t exist until 1885 nor, until 1914, did the military decoration, M.C. [Military Cross]). The article posited (based on correspondence with the then Lord St. Oswald [family name, Winn]) that no member of the Winn family had visited the United States in the 18^^ century, and that “It now appears certain the United States coins in the 1964 sale were not obtained directly from the Mint by a St. Oswald [Winn] family member.” However, new

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    The D. Brent Pogue Collection, Masterpieces of United States Coinage, Part II

    Highlight: The Jack Collins and Walter Breen book on 1794 dollars mentioned that the Lord St. Oswald 1794 dollar was last seen “at the bourse table of RARCOA/Ed Milas, Jr. during the 1987 ANA Convention in Atlanta.” That reference appears to be a mis-recollection of this coin, dated 1795, which was on display at the RARCOA booth at the 1987 ANA Convention. The Lord St. Oswald 1794 dollar had already been off the market in the D. Brent Pogue Collection for two years at that time. PCGS Population: 1, none finer. (Silver Plug) This is not only the finest Silver Plug certified by PCGS, but has received the second highest grade ever assigned to any 1795 dollar. Publications: Breen, Walter. Walter Breen’s Complete Encyclopedia of United States and Colonial Coins, 1988, p. 424. Plated on page 424. Breen,

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    Americana: Colonial and Federal Coins, Medals and Currency, Featuring Selections from the Hain Family Collection Part II

    Highlight: SECOND FINEST KNOWN S.57 CENT The Lord St. Oswaldis famous coin as tied for Finest Known, while Bland places it in second position. The reverse, by contrast, is a pleasing combination of faded red and light brown. The fields display nearly complete, original mint bloom. Full mint lustre cartwheels can be seen on both sides. The coin was sharply stioick everywhere save the lower left portion of the wreath bow. The Lord St. Oswald Coin. A small carbon depression at the base of the pole is noted. Finer than every other specimen save perhaps the first St. Oswald example, surpassing such memorable pieces as the Gen- sheimer coin and

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    Americana: Colonial and Federal Coins, Medals and Currency, Featuring Selections from the Hain Family Collection Part II

    Highlight: LARGE CENTS MAGNIFICENT 1794 S.69 CENT The Lord St. Oswaldreverse are both red and deep brown in color. The surfaces are smooth, hard, and essentially mark free. The strike is very sharp on both sides. Liberty’s bead on the obverse has a distinct “cameo-like” look to it. High Condition Census. Grad- ed MS-65 -I- and described by tbe New Netherlands cataloguer in 1973 as “Equal to one, possibly two others, also in the Lord St. Oswald sale, and as such, tied for finest known.” Noyes(1999) agrees with the New Netherlands cataloguer’s assessment. Graded MS-63 and ranked CC3 by Bland. (SEE COLOR PLATE) Ex EAN 2 (1985. lot 532); earlier, ex Pine Tree’s sale of

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    The Asylum, Fall 1994

    1/10/1994

    Highlight: 1994 3 Who was Major the Lord St. Oswald? Michael Hodder Anyone interested in 1794 large cents, 1795 half dollars, 1794 dollars, or the history of the First United States Mint probably thinks he already knows who St. Oswald was. Major Rowland Denys Guy Winn, M.C., Fourth Baron St. Oswald, collected coins in the 1 790's. In October 1795, he traveled to Philadelphia and obtained many coins directly from the Mint. Nearly 200 years later, an ancestor of his consigned his collection to Christie's for sale. His collection included two outstanding 1794 dollars, several uncirculated 1795 half dollars, and about 20 exceptional 1794 large cents, some with mint color still remaining. Total face value of St. Oswald's coins was $10. The auction of die St. Oswald collection was held in London on Tuesday

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    The Asylum, Fall 1994

    1/10/1994

    Highlight: Oswald coins were described as having one of the most illustrious pedigree chains known: from the United States Mint in 1795 to Major the Lord St. Oswaldtheir February 1995 Long Beach Sale, were all so described. Very few other American coins can claim such a close connection to the Mint and their time of striking. Very few coins can claim an unbroken, documented pedigree chain back to the United States Mint. There's just one small problem with all this. Major the Lord St. Oswald was not a coin collector. He did not travel to Philadelphia in 1795. In fact, he was not even bom until 1916. Major Sir Rowland Denys Guy Winn, M.C.,

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    The Asylum, Fall 1994

    1/10/1994

    Highlight: 1994 5 If Major the Lord St. Oswald did not collect coins in 1795, how did the story that he did get started, how did we find out that it was wrong, and what does this new information mean for the coins incorrectly pedigreed to his collection? The Christie's sale catalogue stated that the coins being offered in 1964 were "The Property of Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C., removed from Nostell Priory, Wakefield, Yorkshire." The catalogue implied that all the coins were St. Oswald's property but it did not actually state so (the further implication here is that some United States coins from this sale called "St. Oswald coins" may not actually have been consigned by him). The catalogue did not include a biography of St. Oswald, nor was there an introduction that claimed that the United States

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: the “Lord St. Oswalde was either already a collector attuned to the differences in coins or someone who looked at them enough to notice that certain pieces were quite unlike others. To my mind, anyone who was able to assemble a group like the above - even if they were pulled directly from circulation - is someone who qualifies as a bona fide collector. The question remains - do any of the other 45 “Lord St. Oswald

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: tMs Major the Lord St. Oswald - the only member of the family to have this specific title — was not at the PMladelpMa Mint a century and a few decades before he was actually bom! Nor was he a collector of coins, though he did have an interest in aboriginal art and other areas. His name was given in the sale, as the owner of the material being sold. Nowhere in the catalogue was it suggested that he was the person who had visited the Mint in 1795 and obtMned the coins directly, but that didn’t stop people from thinking that was the case, especially as it made more sense that whoever had such special coins presented to them must have been someone important - a British war hero with an impressive sounding title was a perfect fit. TMs was a situation where people tried reading between the lines

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: THE “LORD ST. OSWALD” COLONIAL COINS (Jeff Rock) Researching colonial coins has always been fun, but a dealer seldom has significant amounts of free time to devote to that part of the hobby, and occasionally some interesting pieces just get “held back” for further research, sometimes for several years. One of the coins that has kept me up for hours on end recently is a New Jersey copper. Not because it is a very rare variety, or because it has wonderful mint luster... but because of a handwritten note on an envelope. Ah, the Devil is in the details. The coin in question is a 1787 New Jersey, Maris 39-a, a slightly scarce variety (currently listed as an R-4), in high-end VF/nearly EF or thereabout condition, with good color and just light evidence of circulation, (Figure 1) Not a bad lookin

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 37, No. 6 (219)

    15/11/2003

    Highlight: Frossard-Garrett-REN S-57 S-58 S-59 Wadlington Lord St. Oswald-Paschal-Sheldon-REN S-60 Heck Merritt-Haines-Wilson-Adams S-61 Wadlington Gilbert-Grandberg-French-Clarke S-62 Boka Brand-Pearl-Clarke-WHS-REN-GEE S-63 S-64 Turissini Stickney-Osner-Levine-Halpern S-65 S-66 Husak Gilbert-French-T.J. Clarke-W.H. Sheldon S-67 Reynolds Bushnell-Brown-Earle, HRN-WHS S-68 Heck Phelps-Steigerwalt-Zug-Gilbert S-69 S-70 Reynolds Lord St. Oswald-REN S-71 Salyards French-T.J. Clarke-WHS-Paschal-GEE-DWL S-72 Boka Maris-Hays-Steigerwalt-French-T.J. Clarke, etc. Our committee will select the others from offerings of EAC members. - 430 -

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 38, No. 3 (222)

    1/5/2004

    Highlight: Those ex-Lord St. Oswald 1794’s were stunning. . .So close up under the glass you could almost touch them. If you visually subtracted the case frame and the variety notations from the surface on which they lay, you could imagine you were at a Philadelphia merchant’s counter sometime in early 1795; apologizing for not yet having the small change of his recoined silver deposit back from the mint, the proprietor counts out this group of 1794 coppers to make your change. Try to imagine! That was part of our Rio Vista world! But those tens of thousands of humble ‘Round-and-Browns’ had their own populist pride of place— coins that served in countless small transactions over the years, as the United States expanded from a loosely-knit group of coastal colonies to a continental nation. In the

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 26, No. 5(152)

    15/9/1992

    Highlight: Many of you have heard of the Lord St. Oswald estate coins, including 1794 and 1 795 dollars and 1 794 cents, gathered in the infant United States in the 1 790's, and sold in 1964 by Christie's, London. It was an unprecedented offering. In February of this year, Christie's quietly and without most serious dealers' or collectors' knowledge, auctioned off a few more Lord St. Oswald coins recently found by the descendants. Eric, through his contacts, heard of this upcoming sale, and flew to London weeks before the event to examine the lots. He then flew home and placed "unlimited" bids with an agent, instructing him to "just buy the coins." He was accordingly successful in acquiring two MS-64 / MS-65 (as slabbed) 1794 red and brown half cents, an EF-40 S-57, an S-2 Chain cent (now in this

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 27, No. 3(156)

    15/5/1993

    Highlight: Lord St Oswald Collection, 100.00 Chreties: 2/18/1992, [Lord St Oswald Collection B], prl 15.00 Gborge Clapt us. Cents 1804-1814, 1941 15.00 Gborge Clapp A Howard Nbwcomk U.S. Cerus of the Years 1795, 1796, 1797, 1800; 1947, 74 pages, 4 plates, blue and black cloth 175.00 Gborge IL Clapt (photocopy of his inventory/check list of Large Cents 1793-1816), 44 pages meticulously printed in the collector’s hand 35.00 Edward Cogan: 11/1/1858: (Sale 1) Priced Catalogue of U.S. CerUs, 3 pages, 77 lots, tan paper covers, crisp very fine 75.00 Sylvester Crosby: The Forty Coins of America arul the Laws Governing Their Issue, 1875, 381 pages, 10 heliotype plates, 2 folding manuscript plates, 110 wood engravings, contemporary half leather, fine original copy 650.00 Crosby: Early Coins of America..,

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    OSTHEIMER COLLECTION RARITIES OFFERED

    08/01/2010

    Highlight: adding rarities along the way including one of the two Lord St. Oswald 1794 silver dollars, Lot 137 in the 1964 Christie, Manson and Woods auction of the Lord St. Oswald Collection. The Ostheimers collected in many areas, including art, stamps, (William Jennings) Bryan Political Items and Hawaiian tokens. In 1973 Superior Stamp & Coin (Ira and Larry Goldberg) purchased the Ostheimer collection of Bryan Political Items. What was not well known is that the Ostheimers had one of the largest collections ever of So-Called Dollars (SCDs), with over 700 different H&K numbers (Hibler & Kappen, So-Called Dollars, 1963). They started collecting the SCDs in 1957 which at this time were classified by Kenney numbers (Richard D. Kenney, So-Called Dollars, Coin Collector's Journal, July-August, 1953).

    W. David Perkins forwarded this note about rarities with a numismatic literature connection from th

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    The Asylum, Fall 1994

    1/10/1994

    Highlight: 1994 3 Who was Major the Lord St. Oswald? Michael Hodder Anyone interested in 1794 large cents, 1795 half dollars, 1794 dollars, or the history of the First United States Mint probably thinks he already knows who St. Oswald was. Major Rowland Denys Guy Winn, M.C., Fourth Baron St. Oswald, collected coins in the 1 790's. In October 1795, he traveled to Philadelphia and obtained many coins directly from the Mint. Nearly 200 years later, an ancestor of his consigned his collection to Christie's for sale. His collection included two outstanding 1794 dollars, several uncirculated 1795 half dollars, and about 20 exceptional 1794 large cents, some with mint color still remaining. Total face value of St. Oswald's coins was $10. The auction of die St. Oswald collection was held in London on Tuesday

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    The Asylum, Fall 1994

    1/10/1994

    Highlight: Oswald coins were described as having one of the most illustrious pedigree chains known: from the United States Mint in 1795 to Major the Lord St. Oswaldtheir February 1995 Long Beach Sale, were all so described. Very few other American coins can claim such a close connection to the Mint and their time of striking. Very few coins can claim an unbroken, documented pedigree chain back to the United States Mint. There's just one small problem with all this. Major the Lord St. Oswald was not a coin collector. He did not travel to Philadelphia in 1795. In fact, he was not even bom until 1916. Major Sir Rowland Denys Guy Winn, M.C.,

    Read more

    The Asylum, Fall 1994

    1/10/1994

    Highlight: 1994 5 If Major the Lord St. Oswald did not collect coins in 1795, how did the story that he did get started, how did we find out that it was wrong, and what does this new information mean for the coins incorrectly pedigreed to his collection? The Christie's sale catalogue stated that the coins being offered in 1964 were "The Property of Major the Lord St. Oswald, M.C., removed from Nostell Priory, Wakefield, Yorkshire." The catalogue implied that all the coins were St. Oswald's property but it did not actually state so (the further implication here is that some United States coins from this sale called "St. Oswald coins" may not actually have been consigned by him). The catalogue did not include a biography of St. Oswald, nor was there an introduction that claimed that the United States

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: THE “LORD ST. OSWALD” COLONIAL COINS (Jeff Rock) Researching colonial coins has always been fun, but a dealer seldom has significant amounts of free time to devote to that part of the hobby, and occasionally some interesting pieces just get “held back” for further research, sometimes for several years. One of the coins that has kept me up for hours on end recently is a New Jersey copper. Not because it is a very rare variety, or because it has wonderful mint luster... but because of a handwritten note on an envelope. Ah, the Devil is in the details. The coin in question is a 1787 New Jersey, Maris 39-a, a slightly scarce variety (currently listed as an R-4), in high-end VF/nearly EF or thereabout condition, with good color and just light evidence of circulation, (Figure 1) Not a bad lookin

    Read more

    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: tMs Major the Lord St. Oswald - the only member of the family to have this specific title — was not at the PMladelpMa Mint a century and a few decades before he was actually bom! Nor was he a collector of coins, though he did have an interest in aboriginal art and other areas. His name was given in the sale, as the owner of the material being sold. Nowhere in the catalogue was it suggested that he was the person who had visited the Mint in 1795 and obtMned the coins directly, but that didn’t stop people from thinking that was the case, especially as it made more sense that whoever had such special coins presented to them must have been someone important - a British war hero with an impressive sounding title was a perfect fit. TMs was a situation where people tried reading between the lines

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    The C4 Newsletter, Fall 2010

    1/9/2010

    Highlight: the “Lord St. Oswalde was either already a collector attuned to the differences in coins or someone who looked at them enough to notice that certain pieces were quite unlike others. To my mind, anyone who was able to assemble a group like the above - even if they were pulled directly from circulation - is someone who qualifies as a bona fide collector. The question remains - do any of the other 45 “Lord St. Oswald

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 37, No. 6 (219)

    15/11/2003

    Highlight: Frossard-Garrett-REN S-57 S-58 S-59 Wadlington Lord St. Oswald-Paschal-Sheldon-REN S-60 Heck Merritt-Haines-Wilson-Adams S-61 Wadlington Gilbert-Grandberg-French-Clarke S-62 Boka Brand-Pearl-Clarke-WHS-REN-GEE S-63 S-64 Turissini Stickney-Osner-Levine-Halpern S-65 S-66 Husak Gilbert-French-T.J. Clarke-W.H. Sheldon S-67 Reynolds Bushnell-Brown-Earle, HRN-WHS S-68 Heck Phelps-Steigerwalt-Zug-Gilbert S-69 S-70 Reynolds Lord St. Oswald-REN S-71 Salyards French-T.J. Clarke-WHS-Paschal-GEE-DWL S-72 Boka Maris-Hays-Steigerwalt-French-T.J. Clarke, etc. Our committee will select the others from offerings of EAC members. - 430 -

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 38, No. 3 (222)

    1/5/2004

    Highlight: Those ex-Lord St. Oswald 1794’s were stunning. . .So close up under the glass you could almost touch them. If you visually subtracted the case frame and the variety notations from the surface on which they lay, you could imagine you were at a Philadelphia merchant’s counter sometime in early 1795; apologizing for not yet having the small change of his recoined silver deposit back from the mint, the proprietor counts out this group of 1794 coppers to make your change. Try to imagine! That was part of our Rio Vista world! But those tens of thousands of humble ‘Round-and-Browns’ had their own populist pride of place— coins that served in countless small transactions over the years, as the United States expanded from a loosely-knit group of coastal colonies to a continental nation. In the

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 23, No. 1(130)

    15/1/1989

    Highlight: the Lord St. Oswald S-67. The coin was technically very close to mint state. However, at some time a lamina- tion had been pried out of the bust above the date and a repair was attempted. Surely this detracted from the coin, but to some extent the illustrious pedigree could be called upon to offset the defect. This was a Lord St. Oswald Cent, surely no worse than net EF45/AU55, equal to the eighth finest known. A very slightly finer specimen sold at Halpern for over $7000. We must have been napping when the hammer fell at $2900 to a Florida collector. The G6 S-68, lot 2728, the Hays discovery specimen, proved that pedigree was still worth a premium by selling for $800 to the same California collector as the S-35. Lot 2738, a superb S-77, exactly AU50 as described, brought $6000 to a

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 26, No. 5(152)

    15/9/1992

    Highlight: Many of you have heard of the Lord St. Oswald estate coins, including 1794 and 1 795 dollars and 1 794 cents, gathered in the infant United States in the 1 790's, and sold in 1964 by Christie's, London. It was an unprecedented offering. In February of this year, Christie's quietly and without most serious dealers' or collectors' knowledge, auctioned off a few more Lord St. Oswald coins recently found by the descendants. Eric, through his contacts, heard of this upcoming sale, and flew to London weeks before the event to examine the lots. He then flew home and placed "unlimited" bids with an agent, instructing him to "just buy the coins." He was accordingly successful in acquiring two MS-64 / MS-65 (as slabbed) 1794 red and brown half cents, an EF-40 S-57, an S-2 Chain cent (now in this

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    Penny-Wise, Vol. 27, No. 3(156)

    15/5/1993

    Highlight: Lord St Oswald Collection, 100.00 Chreties: 2/18/1992, [Lord St Oswald Collection B], prl 15.00 Gborge Clapt us. Cents 1804-1814, 1941 15.00 Gborge Clapp A Howard Nbwcomk U.S. Cerus of the Years 1795, 1796, 1797, 1800; 1947, 74 pages, 4 plates, blue and black cloth 175.00 Gborge IL Clapt (photocopy of his inventory/check list of Large Cents 1793-1816), 44 pages meticulously printed in the collector’s hand 35.00 Edward Cogan: 11/1/1858: (Sale 1) Priced Catalogue of U.S. CerUs, 3 pages, 77 lots, tan paper covers, crisp very fine 75.00 Sylvester Crosby: The Forty Coins of America arul the Laws Governing Their Issue, 1875, 381 pages, 10 heliotype plates, 2 folding manuscript plates, 110 wood engravings, contemporary half leather, fine original copy 650.00 Crosby: Early Coins of America..,

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    Public Auction Sale featuring U.S. and Canadian Currency, Broken Bank Notes, Confederate Fractional Currency...

    Highlight: by Major the Lord St. Oswald; lot 143 in the Christie auction of his coins. By far the finest known, unapproached in con- dition by any other ever reported of this very rare variety. Neither Col. Green, Boyd, nor Holmes had anything like this. PLATE 590 1795. Ov. 32, B. 5-1. A in STATES over an E. Nearly Fine, centers not well struck up; deep gray tone. 591 1795. Ov. 34, B. 7-L. Fine or so, a couple of edge test marks. Uneven strike but ex- cellent surfaces. Rare. 592 1795. Ov. 35, B. 7-K. About Fine. Said to be very rare. 593 1795. Ov. 42, B. 9-N. “AM El RICA.” Surfaces better than Fine, some areas of F-VF sharpness, others suggest VG-usual uneven striking. Overall grading Fine. Scarce. 594 1795. Ov. 46, B. 18-P. Y cut over a star, CA recut. EF. Last three stars weak, ad- justment marks a

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    The Reed Hawn Collection of United States Coins

    Highlight: by Major the Lord St. Oswald; lot 143 in the Christie auction of his coins. By far the Finest Known, unapproached in condition by any other ever reported of this very rare variety. Neither Col. Green, Boyd, nor Holmes had anything like this." Ex Lester Merkin Feb. 1971 Auction Sale (lot 589) at $3,800.00. This coin will no doubt fetch double its last record and well worth it. EXTREMELY RARE 1795 SMALL HEAD HALF DOLLAR IN MINT STATE 3 1795 Small Head. Brilliant Uncirculated. "Overton 56, Beistle 15-Ga. The famous Small Head. Entirely different style of portrait from most 1794-1795 Half Dollars. Brilliant choice Uncirculated, reverse developing golden, honey- colored and gray toning. Unevenly struck as always for the type, centers weak, the rest as sharp as one would wish. Obtained directly

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    The Gibson Collection of United States Coins, Pioneer & Territorial Gold Coins and World Historical Coins

    Highlight: They were the two in the Lord St. Oswald Sale, 1964; a specimen in Kreis- berg-CIohen Sale, 1973, and one of the Lord St. Oswald coins sold again by Superior twice within a short space of time. We have compared this example with the Unique trial striking of the 1794 Dollar in copper, now in our possession. The stars on both are unusually sharp and clear. The boldness of the left hand stars (although weaker than the right) makes it apparent that the coin offered here must be one of the earliest struck. In our opinion this splendid and important United States silver coin has the potential of setting a record price. — 15 —

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    The Autmun Sale: United States Gold, Silver & Copper Coins

    Highlight: The two Lord St. Oswald0 Pounds each; 5. The Amon Carter specimen. "A coin of this quality is deserving of the finest cabinet of coins, and those interested in owning this outstanding specimen are urged to disregard Guidebook valuation when bidding on this top quality rarity." Since the Miles Sale, there has been only one coin not in our listing better than this (Kreisberg-Cohen 1973) and one of the Lord. St. Oswald coins offered twice. Without question the most histori- cally important Silver coin of the Federal issues. 288 1795 Three leaf variety. Very Fine, even wear, two minor rim nicks on the reverse. Golden and iridescent. 289 1795 Draped bust. A nice even Very Fine, steel and slightly iridescent. — 23 —

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    The Greater New York Numismatic Convention Sale of United States, Ancient & Foreign Coins

    Highlight: This coin was lot 141 in Christie’s Major Lord St. Oswaldld in Lon- don on October 13, 1964. It is illustrated in Walter Breen’s "Encyclopedia of United States and Colonial Proof Coins” where the author described it as a "Presentation Piece.” Without question it is one of the finest examples of the Dollar in existence. However, it must be doubted that the coin should be classi- fied as a "Presentation Piece.” The 4th Lord St. Oswald who consigned his United States coins to Christie’s for sale in October, 1964 was a collateral descendant of Sir Rowland Winn, Bart., a wealthy young Englishman of liberal sentiments, an inquiring mind and a taste for adventure. It would appear probable that these qualities in- spired him, at the age of 20, to visit North America in 1795 to see for

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