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    spanish milled

    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 17

    Highlight: Thsee Spanish Milled Dollars,*. for the Value thereof, according to Ref- f <* hit ion of Corigrtfs. ^ t kkrf ^©J&?®©©®© *■ Lot No. 4039 4039 Georgia. 1776. Quarter Spanish Milled Dollar. Unnumbered. About Extremely Fine. Border variety (h). Signed by Andrew, Evans and Wade. Printed on laid paper. At lower right, ‘QUARTER’ and ‘DOLLAR’ separated by ornaments within a square frame composed of ornaments. From the face, looks nearly new. Vertical fold and partial left side fold. Well balanced and complete margins. Very sharp for the type and a great “Thirteen Colony” set type note. Ex F.C.C. Boyd Estate. These nearly square and typeset bills were printed in sheets of eight notes without a color seal. The Quarter dollar notes have eight border varieties and the Half Dollar notes use four border

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    195th auction sale of rare coins, medals & tokens, and paper money. [03/19/1959]

    Highlight: ONE SPANISH MILLED DOLLAR. Dated Dec. 23, 1776. Wood engraving on rough brown paper. 4 autograph signatures. Tree on rock. Very fine. $12.50. 374. South Carolina FOUR SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS dated Dec. 23, 1776, year of Independence. Wood engraving on rough brown paper. Ship on fire. Two autographs. Ex. fine, um.sual condition. $15. 375. Same, but SIX SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS, date and type as last. Signature J. Wakefield. Camel in vignette. Very fine. $12.50. 376. Same, but EIGHT SPANISH MILLEDly 17, 1775. Copper plate engraving. Fine. $12.50. 378. I 21/2 shillings May 6, 1776. V. good, rather fine. Rare issue. $15. 379. Virginia FIVE SPANISH MILLED DOLLAR

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    The Estate of Norman Bryant and the Estate of Dean Mathey Collections of United States and Foreign Coins

    Highlight: 5 Spanish Milled Dollars. Serial #72622 (76,923 printed), signed by William Webb and John Ord. Well centered and sharply printed with excellent signatures and number. A lovely Crisp Un- circulated note. 105 Continental Currency. Sept. 26, 1778. 8 Spanish Milled Dollars; Jan. 14, 1779. 2 Spanish Milled Dollars; Jan. 14, 1779. 45 Spanish Milledo have this odd denomination). The last two are printed in 2 colors, red and black; Feb. 17, 1776. Vs Dollar. Plate B. Mostly Good. 4 pieces. 106 Maryland. April 10, 1774. Two Dollars; South Carolina. Dec. 23, 1776. Four Spanish Milled Dollars. Very Fine. 2 pieces. 107 Massachusetts. 1779 from the act of 1/26/79. 2 Shillings 6 Pence. Serial #2331 (9,411 printed), signed by Jonathan Brown. The plates for this note were en-

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    The Philadelphia Americana Sale, Part One: American Paper Currency

    Highlight: One Spanish Milledo.l2015. Justice. The seal color is deep on paper that is uniformly and handsomely toned. Crisp and original paper with extremely broad, full width selvedge edges. An attractive example. (2,000-2,500) 701 GEORGIA. 1776. ^ I^.TTFICATH imiilefi ilicEcarer 10)# 1 SPANISH ANLLED 1 : l8C/jlor ihft Value thereof, accorclii!e; to RciblutJoj!] dV - - si Georgia. 1776 Light Blue Seal. Four Spanish Milled Dollars. Extremely Fine-40 (PMG). No.5819. Liberty Cap. A bold blue seal with five well accomplished signatures. Evenly margined and at- tractive. There are some very petty mounting remnants noted on the back, these are scarcely visible. (2,000-2,500) GEORGIA. 1776* S T his certificate imiilts Ihc Bearer to K FOUR SPANISH- B ILLED DOLLARS/S the Value

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 10

    Highlight: the Bearer Jo TWENTY SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS. or the Value thereof, according to Refolution of CONGRESS. _ _ GEORGIA. 1776. No./iW' *1 ' X g 5 $C'’T"'HIS CERTIFICATE intitles the Bearer to*U gifcs I ONE SPANISH MILLED 1 ONii sil- HISCERTF^ATF in titles the Bearer to X ANI&H milled dollar S&^or the Value thereof, according to Refohitioa of ^ - - V ^ssfi^l $ 44 '^ ON GRES J Sffiaii o A (P/tto-MS. IJAX T T SjMi GEORGIA. 1776. No. 34 J 7 «,»"^C!lr-|r-tI-ILS CERTIFICATE in titles the Bearer to.* | TWO SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS,.* j

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    The Nonagon, vol. 2, no. 1

    1/9/1964

    Highlight: to one thirtieth of a Spanish millede" vertically at right of tree. At bottom "Crown Point" is on each side with 6 d above, and between is a blank line with June 1 at left end and 1756 at right end. Two other lines above this provide spaces for the other two signatures. 6d in MHS, also reprints. Other denominations in this sheet are similar style with squirrel replaced by bird on branch on 5 shillings, l/3 Spanish milled dollar, 20/s O.T. (date on

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    The Nonagon, vol. 2, no. 1

    1/9/1964

    Highlight: to one thirtieth of a Spanish millede" vertically at right of tree. At bottom "Crown Point" is on each side with 6 d above, and between is a blank line with June 1 at left end and 1756 at right end. Two other lines above this provide spaces for the other two signatures. 6d in MHS, also reprints. Other denominations in this sheet are similar style with squirrel replaced by bird on branch on 5 shillings, l/3 Spanish milled dollar, 20/s O.T. (date on

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    Krause Publications Correspondence, 1977-2009

    /1977

    Highlight: Because the Spanish Milled Dollar had achieved widespread acceptance throughout much of the American colonial period, it was a natural choice on which to base a national coinage system for the newly indepen- dent states. The Spanish Milled Dollar had already been accorded legal tender status in several colonies, notably Massachusetts, Connecticut and Virginia, and most of the other colonies had given it serious consid - 1 eration in formulating their own currency statutes. When the Continental Congress issued its first paper | money to finance the fight for liberty, the notes themselves promised to pay their face value in "Spanish i milled dollars or the Value thereof in Gold or Silver.” And, of course, the first quasi-official American \ coinage, the 1776 Continental "Dollar,” while not

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    The Minot Collection

    Highlight: HIS CERTIFICATE Entitled the Bearer to TEN SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS, | ; Value Lhertof, Dccordiog to Refolution 3317 Georgia. 1776 Orange or Green Seal. Two Spanish Milledm the verso mainly. Slightly close on the lower left margin and end margins. There is a very short and difficult to see edge tear at the bottom right. From the 1993 Memphis International Paper Money Show Auc- tion (R.M. Smythe & Co., June 18-19, 1993, Lot 2272). 3318 Georgia. 1776 Orange or Green Seal. Two Spanish Milled Dol- lars. Fine. No.472. Orange Seal.

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 15

    Highlight: JS# ^/C 7 g 3 er Tbit Certificate intitles the Bearer to % & Three Spanish Milleda 1777. a 27»w Certificate inti ties tbsf&earer to «.Three Spanish Mii No./D ff w.u- theB carer to ilied Dollars, or the Value thereof , according to Rejc- <:• hit ion of Congrcjs. K . \yf/J /, * t > / *, V > fc§ Dolkrs ^ •*> 4* T *'> ee-j- f 'vL.yi-t *• ■ = B-^ •hhzm ~> •v* .y. •;> * y> *► ■3* •«. Lot No. 8091 Lot No. 8092 8091 Georgia. 1777. Three Spanish Milled Dollars. No. 5457. ‘THREE/DOLLARS’ in ornamental frame. Border variety (b) with hourglass ornamentation in interior of denomination box. A distinctive type without a seal, but a pattern design. Signed by Stone, Andrew, Saltus, Wade

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 17

    Highlight: 1776 SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS TYPES Part of Lot No. 4418 4418 Treasury of Virginia, May 6, 1776 Ordinance, Partial Spanish Milled Dollar Denomi- nation Type Set. Standard paper, size, and uniface designs. "Semper” vignette with Virginia trampling tyranny at upper left with cast border cuts. One Sixth of a Dollar. No. 18855. Signed by Tho.[mas] Davis. These were equivalent to One Shilling. Fine to Very Fine. Quarter folded, but still rather bright; One Third of a Dollar. No. 13242. Signed by Davis. Fine to Very Fine. Creased and handled. Still fairly bright from the face. Face mica still with some sparkle; Four Dollars. No. 20571. Signed by Morris and Seaton. Slightly different style border cuts and vignette than prior two. Fine. Back corner tip mounted to white card. Clean from the face. A

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 17

    Highlight: Trio of Spanish Milled Dollar Fractional Denominations. Both signed by B.flonet] Pasteur. Slightly thinner rag paper, size, and uniface designs. Horizontal format, approximately 95mm by 65mm. ‘’Semper” vignette with Virginia trampling tyranny at upper left with cast border cuts. One Sixth of a Spanish Milled Dollar. No. 12907. About Extremely Fine. Light fold and some heavier handling on the ends. The face is bright with sparkling mica. Mostly clear margins all around. Certainly, premium quality for the type; One Third of a Spanish Milledthis lot, but still attractive. Quarter folded with some handling. A few minor foxing spots on the face; Two Thirds of a Spanish Milled Dollar. No. 18862. Extremely Fine or on the

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    Sale of Standard Silver Dollars Held by the Treasury : Hearings, Eighty-ninth Congress, second session, on H.R. 13150 (and related bills) ... July 26-28, 1966

    26/7/1966

    Highlight: involving the use of Spanish milled silver dollars for payments of notes to be issued by the Congress. The Journal of the Continental Congress on June 22, 1775, records a “resolve” that a sum not exceeding two millions of Spanish milled dollars be emitted by the Congress in bills of credit for the defense of America. At the time there were many different kinds of colonial shillings in circulation, all with different values in terms of the English shilling. However, the Spanish silver dollar, which came in by trade across the frontier from Louisiana, which Spain later ceded to France, was the principal coin of commerce. It contained 374% grains of silver. A committee of seven was appointed by the Continental Congress on April 19, 1776, to examine and ascertain the value of the species of

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    Sale of Standard Silver Dollars Held by the Treasury : Hearings, Eighty-ninth Congress, second session, on H.R. 13150 (and related bills) ... July 26-28, 1966

    26/7/1966

    Highlight: involving the use of Spanish milled silver dollars for payments of notes to be issued by the Congress. The Journal of the Continental Congress on June 22, 1775, records a “resolve” that a sum not exceeding two millions of Spanish milled dollars be emitted by the Congress in bills of credit for the defense of America. At the time there were many different kinds of colonial shillings in circulation, all with different values in terms of the English shilling. However, the Spanish silver dollar, which came in by trade across the frontier from Louisiana, which Spain later ceded to France, was the principal coin of commerce. It contained 374% grains of silver. A committee of seven was appointed by the Continental Congress on April 19, 1776, to examine and ascertain the value of the species of

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    190th auction sale of rare coins and paper money. [03/02/1956]

    Highlight: 1775 “One Spanish Milled Dollar.” Arms of colony. Good. $5. 102. Same, but $5.00. Poor, but rare and all readable. $3. 103. Mar. 5, 1776 “Two-thirds of a Spanish Milled Dollar.” Fair. $3. 104. New York Water Works 1 shilling Aug. 25, 1774. Ex. fine. $ 6 . 105. Same, but 2 shillings, and dated Aug. 2, 1775. Ex. fine. $6. 106. Same, but 4 shillings. Fine. $4. 107. Mar. 5, 1776 eight shillings of N. Y. Water Works, very fine. V. rare, unpriced in catalogue. $10. 108. Dec. 26, 1814 New York City Corporation notes for 4, 6, 9, & 12 V 2 cents. Old reprints, but very interesting with pic- tures on backs. 4 pcs. sold as one. $15. 109. North Carolina 30 shillings dated Apr. 23, 1761 "Proclama- tion Money" (so-stated on note). The back is filled with ink signatures of the times. Poor because of

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    190th auction sale of rare coins and paper money. [03/02/1956]

    Highlight: $5 “Spanish Milled Dollars” VIRGINIA CURRENCY. Only fair as usual, but all readable. 3 pcs. $8. 194. Same, but $8.00. Good. $4. 195. May 5, 1777 One Spanish Milled Dollar. Good. $3.50. 196. Oct. 20, 1777 One Sixth dollar Virginia Currency. Good. $4. 197. Same, but 15 Spanish Milledue. V. good. $25. 199. Oct. 5, 1778 $100. Large note about 5V2 x 2 V 2 in. Good; worn at fold and mended on back, but everything very clear. Ex. rare, unpriced & not listed in standard catalogue. $20. 200. May 3, 1779 Virginia 15 Pound note, or “Fifty Spanish Milled Dollars.” Large note 6x5 inches. Good, and everything very clear. Ex. rare

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    Krause Publications Correspondence, 1977-2009

    /1977

    Highlight: Because the Spanish Milled Dollar had achieved widespread acceptance throughout much of the American colonial period, it was a natural choice on which to base a national coinage system f o^the ne w ly mdepe n - dont **atr:; . The Spanish Milled Dollar had already been accorded legal tender status^itf several colonies, notably Massachusetts, Connecticut and Virginia, and most of the other colonies Ifa^gua^t 1 er^feflft in formulating their own currency statutes. When the Continental Congress issued its first paper j money to finance the fight for liberty, the notes themselves promised to pay their face value in "Spanish j milled dollars or the Value thereof in Gold or Silver." Andti ffki

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    The Metropolitan Numismatic Convention Sale of United States and Foreign Gold, Silver, Copper Coins and Paper Money

    Highlight: 1119 One Spanish Milled Dollar, May 5, 17 80. Cancelled with small triangle hole. Uncirculated. 1120 Four Spanish Milled Dollars, May 5, 1780. Cancelled as above. Uncirculated. 1121 Seven Spanish Milled Dollars, May 5, 1780. Cancelled with circular hole. Uncirculated. 1122 Eight Spanish Milled Dollars, May 5, 1780. Cancelled as above. Uncirculated. 1123 Twenty Spanish Milled Dollars, May 5, 1780. Cancelled as above. “Interest paid one year” stamped in Chinese red on face of the note. Uncirculated. 1124 Twenty Two Pound Proniissary Note, June 1, 1777, No. 368. Obv. Ornamental floral borders, “State of Massachusetts Bay” and vignette of soldier with sword (symbol of work done by Revere) surrounds text. Plate engraved by Paul Revere. Inscription on face of note indicates that interest was pai

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    The Minot Collection

    Highlight: Two Spanish Milled Dollars. Very Good. No.4713. Floating Jugs. Border variety (c). Signed by Bard, LaVien, Habersham, Ewen, and O'Bryen. The seal is sharp, but the borders are trimmed all around. Upper right with a blurred yellow stain on the serial. Minor splits are reinforced from the back. 3314 Georgia. 1776 Light Blue Seal. Four Spanish Milled Dollars. Fine. No.8370. Liberty Cap. Border variety (c). Signed by McGil- livray, Telfair, Houghton, Ewen, and O'Bryen. A bright seal, but the margins are trimmed into the ornaments. Internal slit within the signature area. Lightly foxed on the lower right cor- ner. Much more attractive than the classified technical grade. From Richard Picker. Unusual Four Dollars Liberty Cap Seal Note K JO- -OC X GEORGI A* 1776* No- S v: P^qperS C.r-RTI FIQAtB

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    The Philadelphia Americana Sale, Part One

    Highlight: Trio of Spanish Milled Dollar fractional denominations. All signed by B.[lonet] Pasteur. Slightly thinner rag paper, size, and uniface designs. Hori- zontal format, approximately 95mm by 65mm. "Semper" vignette with Virginia trampling tyranny at upper left with cast border cuts: ☆ One Sixth of a Spanish Milled Dollar. No. 12907. About Extremely Fine. Light fold and some heavier handling on the ends. The face is bright with sparkling mica. Mostly clear margins all around. Certainly, premium quality for the type ☆ One Third of a Spanish Milled lot, but still attractive. Quarter folded with some handling. A few minor foxing spots on the face: ☆ Two Thirds of a Spanish Milled Dollar. No.18862. Extremely Fine or on

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    The Cardinal Collection

    Highlight: The Cardinal Collection of Early Silver Dollars Mexico 1759 MM Eight Reales Spanish Milled or “Pillar” Dollar 1 Mexico. 1759 MM 8 reales. Mexico City mint. MS-63 (PCGS). It IS perhaps unsurprising that the Cardinal Col- lection begins where the dollar denomination in America itself began, with the ubiquitous Spanish milled or “pillar” dollar, in this case from the Casa de Moneda in Mexico City. The selection of the dollar as the basic monetary unit ot our young nation was not an historical accident, instead, this Spanish colonial coin was the standard against which all forms ot exchange in early America was measured against. It was illustrated on Maryland paper money as early as 1767 (the first American money denominated in “dollars”) and when the Continental Congress met in 1776, a

    Auction catalogue of American Numismatic Rarities, LLC.

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 10

    Highlight: the Bearer to 3 ircS 3 £ r ^ E SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS,'" hc Value thereof^according to Rcfolutioa oh •^JSScoNORm ^ 1 '^^nf: 4550 ’§ Georgia, 1776. [N 0 . J;?/ ] f 'HISCaatlNCAT* intitles the Bearer 3 T’ ver fc£i.* to receive Two Spanish Milled <• Dollars, or theValue thereof in Gold or Sil- ? according to Refolution ofC©i*OMsl» % . |§ E JBR * ^ S t ^ dollars. £ pJ»^XXXXXXX>CC(XX>C^ «•• GEORGIA * No^ , fe!^ r r HI ^ ERTTFrCATT? intitles the Bearer to * 1 TEN Spanish milledfcuMfcfti f WW /. T E Nfj| XZtL&rtr ^ A DOLLARS. Georgia. 1777. Nojtfrf* ♦ . , Thu Certificate intitles the Bearer tot t Three Spanish Milled Doha*? + or the Value thereof,

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 15

    Highlight: Two Spanish Milled Dollars. No. 4908. Orange seal. Floating Jugs. SI COL- LIDIMUS FRANGIMUR. Border variety (h). Signed by Saltus, Andrew, Evans, O’Bryen and Ewen. Printed on laid paper. From the face, Apparent Choice Extremely Fine or better. Corner tip mounted to a white card. No heavy folds seen from the face, but there is evidence of harsh paper mounting remnants on the back (seen when held up to a strong light source). The seal color is attrac- tive with some light toning. Cut closely and uniformly all around. Raymond code and price of “4.50” on the back of the card. Expert conservation might very well restore a note that may border on the excep- tional. Ex F.C.C. Boyd Estate; Way te Raymond. ATTRACTIVE “MILLSTONE ON PALM TREE” ORANGE SEAL TYPE GEORGIA. 1776. No. HIS CER riPTCAl '

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    Mail auction sale including Brazillian banknotes : illustrated in the new Dale A. Seppa catalog ... [04/23/1976]

    Highlight: 1 Spanish Milled Dollar. 1776 - blue seal. Evens/O’Bryen/Houston/ Bard/Gibson. Very Fine, center fold. A nice piece. (150.00-200.00) PHOTO 2891 MARYLAND. Two Thirds of a Dollar. April 10, 1774. Clapham/Eddis. Abt Ex Fine, center fold. (50.00-75.00) 2892 MASSACHUSETTS BAY. 1 Spanish Milled Dollar. May 5, 1780. Cranch/Baldwin Fine. (20.00-30.00) 2893 STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 3 Spanish Milled. Pcarson/McClurc/Robinson. Abt Very Fine, hole cancelled. (50.00-75.00) 2894 NEW JERSEY. 30 Shillings. March 25, 1776. Deare/Robt Smith/Jos. Smith. Abt Ex Fine. ( 50. 00- 75. 00) 2895 NEW YORK. 3 Spanish MilledBrower. Very Fine+, but central foxing and rust hole. (50.00-75.00) 2896 NORTH CAROLINA. 25 Spanish Milled Dollars.

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: ions .1 he>- otigEt: iff ix-ar to Spanish milled dollars: ” The- rtMiiptetod report of Sep- tember 2. 1776 rated “Gold in Bullion" at seventeen doHarv petetmy ounce ami '.'Sterling . Alloy; and- Silver’ at one dollar and opt* moth per otmee? -The 'hhport valptid dendminatmti^ i in terms of Spanish milled guinea -5 6 french guinea 5 6 4//-, juhamtes IB 0 id pf-'^lf.^haihnes t# Spanish pistole -1 6 -TG French pistole j 1 iv’C M md ore 6 IS - t> English etown — I I f jj: French crown . — — » English sHil ling : — y. --. \ — ' ' tly . ; - h . Spanish milled dollar ' I * Continental money Fractions of gold coins were rated proportionate^ with the provision for a dediietkin t»f a tw enty-niuth part of a dollar per grain Pn gdld ikiirts

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 43

    1/4/1975

    Highlight: Spanish milled silver dollars (most commonly Mexican mint) were the most prevalent trade coins of that time in North America and, even as today, had a relative value that fluctuated some in practice. Given the shifting welter of equivalences in the 1700's, we need not expect absolute precision, so it is "all right" to have a Spanish milled silver dollar apparently valued at 76 d. for the A-case and 72 d. , now, in the B-case. In any event, at 72 d. per Spanish milledsaw no unusual or practical problems for making change in the face of such fractions. On the same basis, the 10 sh. note would have been equivalent to 1 2/3 Spanish milled silver

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 74

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: of account for the Federal government and was made equivalent to the Spanish milled dollar. Since the Spanish standard did not have a uniform value among the states' moneys of account, neither could the Continental dollar (2). Because the Continental Congress had a permanent base in Philadelphia, the finances of the Revolution were typically expressed in Pennsylvania funds where the Spanish milledntal dollar were, therefore, expressed on the basis of 90 parts to the dollar. This unit of 90 supported the issuance of fractional paper money in denominations of 1/6, 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 of a Spanish milled dollar which were equivalent to 15 d., 30 d., 45 d., and 60 d.

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    Calcoin News, vol. 16, no. 2

    1/3/1962

    Highlight: nations the Spanish Milled Dollar was frequently cut into eight pieces, called bits, from which comes the ex- pression “two bits,” “four bits,” etc. These fascinating coins are of great interest to students of American his- tory. During colonial times they were very popular among some 30 different kinds of money in circulation. The Continental Congress made its cur- rency payable in Spanish Milledorris, Super- intendent of Finance, to report “a table of rates at which the different species of foreign coins most likely to circulate within the United States.” His study revealed that the Spanish Milled Dollar came neares

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    Studies on Money in Early America

    1/1/1976

    Highlight: ions .1 he>- otigEt: iff ix-ar to Spanish milled dollars: ” The- rtMiiptetod report of Sep- tember 2. 1776 rated “Gold in Bullion" at seventeen doHarv petetmy ounce ami '.'Sterling . Alloy; and- Silver’ at one dollar and opt* moth per otmee? -The 'hhport valptid dendminatmti^ i in terms of Spanish milled guinea -5 6 french guinea 5 6 4//-, juhamtes IB 0 id pf-'^lf.^haihnes t# Spanish pistole -1 6 -TG French pistole j 1 iv’C M md ore 6 IS - t> English etown — I I f jj: French crown . — — » English sHil ling : — y. --. \ — ' ' tly . ; - h . Spanish milled dollar ' I * Continental money Fractions of gold coins were rated proportionate^ with the provision for a dediietkin t»f a tw enty-niuth part of a dollar per grain Pn gdld ikiirts

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 43

    1/4/1975

    Highlight: Spanish milled silver dollars (most commonly Mexican mint) were the most prevalent trade coins of that time in North America and, even as today, had a relative value that fluctuated some in practice. Given the shifting welter of equivalences in the 1700's, we need not expect absolute precision, so it is "all right" to have a Spanish milled silver dollar apparently valued at 76 d. for the A-case and 72 d. , now, in the B-case. In any event, at 72 d. per Spanish milledsaw no unusual or practical problems for making change in the face of such fractions. On the same basis, the 10 sh. note would have been equivalent to 1 2/3 Spanish milled silver

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 74

    1/9/1986

    Highlight: of account for the Federal government and was made equivalent to the Spanish milled dollar. Since the Spanish standard did not have a uniform value among the states' moneys of account, neither could the Continental dollar (2). Because the Continental Congress had a permanent base in Philadelphia, the finances of the Revolution were typically expressed in Pennsylvania funds where the Spanish milledntal dollar were, therefore, expressed on the basis of 90 parts to the dollar. This unit of 90 supported the issuance of fractional paper money in denominations of 1/6, 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 of a Spanish milled dollar which were equivalent to 15 d., 30 d., 45 d., and 60 d.

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    The Colonial Newsletter, no. 124

    1/12/2003

    Highlight: the five shilling par value of the Spanish milled dollar was set by law in 1758, becoming known as the “Halifax rating.” This rate established the par value of the Nova Scotia money of account in terms of the Spanish milled dollar. To distinguish “Halifax money” from sterling, the suffix “cy,” for currency, was appended. 122 Although the Spanish milled dollar was never declared legal tender in Nova Scotia, it was accorded that de facto status from common usage. 123 Nova Scotia was now untethered from the Massachusetts finance standard with its new “Halifax rating” of £111.11, Halifax money of account, to £100 sterling, while Massachusetts, after the infusion of specie in 1 749, returned to Proclamation money in 1 750 at £1 33.33, Massachusetts money of account, to£100 sterling. Intrade wit

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    Calcoin News, vol. 16, no. 2

    1/3/1962

    Highlight: nations the Spanish Milled Dollar was frequently cut into eight pieces, called bits, from which comes the ex- pression “two bits,” “four bits,” etc. These fascinating coins are of great interest to students of American his- tory. During colonial times they were very popular among some 30 different kinds of money in circulation. The Continental Congress made its cur- rency payable in Spanish Milledorris, Super- intendent of Finance, to report “a table of rates at which the different species of foreign coins most likely to circulate within the United States.” His study revealed that the Spanish Milled Dollar came neares

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    Facts About Silver, Early Use of Silver as Money

    /1898

    Highlight: payable in Spanish milledmade. 12. At the close of the Revolutionary war, when the Continental paper money passed out of use, foreign coins again became the principal full legal- tender money in this country. UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 13. Thus, when the Constitution was framed, the money of the United States consisted of gold and silver coins, wholly of foreign mintage, the recognized standard being the Spanish milled dollar. 14. By the

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    Money Of The American Colonies

    1/1/1993

    Highlight: and 18.75% (instead of 20%) of a Spanish milled dollar in Philadelphia and New York, respectively, while a Spanish American two reales, as a fractional coin, would have passed at 25% of the dollar in both cities.'*® In New York in 1775 the pistareen passed for Is. 7d., New York money, while in 1793 its value was reduced to Is. 4.5d., despite the fact that the value of the Spanish milled 15d., money of account, that the Is. 3d. Virginia paper money note of 1775 carried the additional designations of “A Pistereen [sic]” and “fifteen pence.”"" At a rate of 72d. Virginia money to the Spanish milled dollar, the other fractional pape

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    Money Of The American Colonies

    1/1/1993

    Highlight: of account for the Federal government and was made equivalent to the Spanish milled dollar. Since the Spanish standard did not have a uniform value among the states’ monies of account, neither could the Continental dollar.’® Because the Continental Congress had a permanent base in Philadelphia, the finances of the Revolution were typically expressed in Pennsylvania funds where the Spanish millednental dollar were, therefore, expressed on the basis of 90 parts to the dollar. The unit of 90 supported the issuance of fractional paper money in denominations of 1/6, 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 of a Spanish milled dollar which were equivalent respectively to 15d., 30d., 45d., and 60d.,

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    The Numismatist, August 1990

    1/8/1990

    Highlight: referred to in the colonies as the Spanish milled dollar, replaced the cob pieces of Mexico in 1732. Struck by a screw press, the quality of the coin was a vast improvement over the cob pieces. The Spanish milledpheres between two columns repre- senting the Pillars of Hercules. Sur- mounting the globes was a crown sym- bolizing Spain’s authority over both the Old World and the New. The ban- ners draped around the pillars form a dollar sign with the motto PLUS ULTRA. This design remained on the Spanish milled dollar and its frac- tional parts (called “bits”) of V^, 1, 2 and 4 reales from 1732 to 1772, when it was replaced by a profile bust of the king. Today, the term “two bits,” meaning a quarter of a dollar, remains part of our language;

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    Catalogue of a private collection of colonial and continental paper money

    Highlight: Three Spanish Milled Dollars ; very fine ; very rare. .228 1777; Three Spanish Milled Dollars; entirely different orna- mental work; uncirculated; very rare. 229 1777; Four Spanish Milled Dollars; cornucopia, Mercury’s wand and Liberty cap; fine, but small piece out of border; rare. 230 1777; Nine Spanish Milled Dollars; figure of Justice, etc.; printed in blue; very fine ; very rare. 231 1778; May 4; $40; bird and hand, with dagger in lower right corner ; large and very fine note ; very rare. 232 1786; October 16; 20 sh. ; tree and hand holding the Constitu- tion in left of note; no urn at top; long note; uncirculated; exceedingly rare. 233 1786; October 16; 5 sh.; nearly same design as preceding, but has a funeral urn at top; fine; exceedingly rare.

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    Public Auction 6

    Highlight: Spanish Milled Dol- lars, So-Called Dollars, Extensive Early Proof Sets, Federal & National Notes prior to 1929, Uncut & Reconstructed Large Size Notes, U.S. & Pioneer Gold. Adams B Sale November 30, 1953. 168th Auction. Outstanding Collections of Coins, Notes, Etc. 96 pp. 2716 lots. Near new, orange card cover. 260 Large Cents; S-272, choice late dates. Dollars by Bolender, Texas Currency, Canadian Currency, Early U.S. & Colonial Coins, 1794-1803 Dollars by Bolender, Gobrecht’s, Early Silver, Federal & National Notes prior to 1929, U.S. Gold & Calif. Gold by Lee, U.S. Patterns & 80 Pattern Dimes. Adams B Sale (65.00) Acquired from Money Tree, 1988 5 ADAMS B SALES 111 February 27, 1954. 174th Auction Choice Selections of Coins, Currency, Etc. 64 pp. 1791 lots. Good, yellow card cover,

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    The Americana Sale

    Highlight: Two Spanish Milled, and O'Bryen. If not Very Eine, very close. The seal is a rich orange and struck upon the paper with crystal clarity. Very vibrant with the folds seen from the verso mainly. Slightly close on the lower left margin and end margins. From the 1993 Memphis International Paper Money Show Auc- tion (R.M. Smythe & Co., June 18-19, 1993, lot 2272). Georgia. 1777 No Resolution Date. Three Spanish Milled Dollars. Almost Uncirculated. No.3660. Enclosed denomina- tion in border emblems. Border variety (g). Signed by Stone, Andrew, Saltus, O'Bryen. and Wade. A very crisp note with a soft vertical fold and light handling. There were back corner glue mounts at one

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    The August 2012 Philadelphia ANA Auction, United States Paper Money

    Highlight: Privateer Com- mander's Sanctioned Bond for 20,000 Spanish Milledth watermark. 31 .0cm by 20,0cm. Watermark of seated woman (Indian Princess?) with cap or hat on pole, title to up- per left. Detailed text obligations printed in two portions, with the bottom lengthier than the top, using the typeset made by Benjamin Franklin for his press at Passy, France. Spaces for insertions. Bond amount in top portion TWENTY TFIOUSAND SPANISH MILLED DOLLARS and space naming the master re- sponsible for this bond. Bottom, space for ship owner, spaces for filling in guns and men on the vessel, the text in multiple lines and detailed obligations. Unlisted in Anderson. The first we have

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    The August 2013 Chicago ANA Auction, U.S. Currency

    Highlight: No ./ffOfJ | g 'HIS CERTIFICATE intitle* the Bearer to X 1 0NE SPANISH MILLED PPQ. No. 10392. Five signatures. Green Justice seal. Much rarer than the orange seal of this denomination. Very clear seal color and excellent definition of details. Complete margins and broader at the left. Very difficult to obtain type in this superior condition. Est. $2500-$3500 G E O R G I A. 1776. No. gyp g CERTIFICATE iWtiTM the Brrtsrr tnX TWO SPANISH MILLED DOLLAR^ thtt Value according to RtibluLoii of Conor vp- gi| & , \ l MI %nm // (osmxs i r ' r r a: 3004 GA-72c. Georgia. 1776. $2. PCGS Very Fine 35 PPQ. No.2373. Five signatures. Orange Floating Jugs seal. A beautiful example with

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    Florida United Numismatists first anniversary convention. [01/10-13/1957]

    Highlight: Intitles Bearer to Ten Spanish Milled Dollars. Note bears the low number 37. Fine $15.00. 136 . — 1776. One Quarter Of a Spanish ."MilledHas three rows of floral designs at left side of note. V. Fine $25.00. 139 . 1776. One Shilling. 1st issue. V. Good to Fine 815.00. 140 . 1776. Six Pence. 1st issue. Two different type borders. Clean. V. Fine. 2 pcs. $40.00. 141 1776, Three-Pence. 1st issue. Two different varieties. V. Good to Fine. 2 pcs. 142 . 1776 Four Spanish Milled Dollars. 2nd issue. Blue vignettes. V. Fine

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    Florida United Numismatists first anniversary convention. [01/10-13/1957]

    Highlight: Intitlcs Bearer to Ten Spanish Milled Dollars. Note bears the low number 37. Fine $15.00. 136. — 1776. One Quarter Of a Spanish MilledHas three rows of floral designs at left side of note. V. Fine $25.00. 139 . 1776. One Shilling. 1st issue. V. Good to Fine $15.00. 140 . 1776. Six Pence. 1st issue. Two different type borders. Clean. V. Fine. 2 pcs. $40.00. 141 _ 1776, Three-Pence. 1st issue. Two different varieties. V. Good to Fine. 2 pcs. 142 . 1776 Four Spanish Milled Dollars. 2nd issue. Blue vignettes. V. Fine

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    The May Sale: United States Coins and Paper Money, Including the Extremely Rare 1854 'S' Quarter Eagle

    Highlight: Four Spanish Milled only and the face appeal is on par with many of the Ford-Boyd notes in our Part X sale held in Atlanta in May, 2005. Notes of this caliber never go out of style and are tremendously popular with good reason. Worth a significant premium over catalogue value and recent auction realizations. I SHARP 1776 QUARTER DOLLAR 831 Georgia. 1776 Fractional Dollar Denominations. Quarter of a Spanish Milled Dollar. No. 6358. Three signatures. Very Fine. Well printed and margined. There

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    Money of the American Colonies and Confederation: A Numismatic, Economic and Historical Correlation

    /1993

    Highlight: 18.75% (instead of 20%) of a Spanish milled dollar in Philadelphia and New York, respectively, while a Spanish American two reales, as a fractional coin, would have passed at 25% of the dollar in both cities. 1 "" In New York in 1775 the pistareen passed for Is. 7d., New York money, while in 1793 its value was reduced to Is. 4.5d., despite the fact that the value of the Spanish milledd., money of account, that the Is. 3d. Virginia paper money note of 1775 carried the additional designations of ‘‘A Pistereen | sic]" and “fifteen pence.” 110 At a rate of 72d. Virginia money to the Spanish milled dollar, the other fractional

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    Money of the American Colonies and Confederation: A Numismatic, Economic and Historical Correlation

    /1993

    Highlight: of account for the Federal government and was made equivalent to the Spanish milled dollar. Since the Spanish standard did not have a uniform value among the states’ monies of account, neither could the Continental dollar. 19 Gecause the Continental Congress had a permanent base in Philadelphia, the finances of the Revolution were typically expressed in Pennsylvania funds where the Spanish millednental dollar were, therefore, expressed on the basis of 90 parts to the dollar. The unit of 90 supported the issuance of fractional paper money in denominations of 1/6, 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 of a Spanish milled dollar which were equivalent respectively to 15d., 30d., 45d., and 60d.,

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 10

    Highlight: One Spanish Milled Dollar. No. 15569. Orange or green seal. Justice. SUSTINE RECTUM. Border variety (d). Signed by Andrew, Saltus, Evans and O’Bryen. There are only four signatures as seen on the green seals. However, the actual color is more towards orange. The field shows the ink color shading that is not present on the orange seal series. Therefore, this probably should be considered an “off’ green seal. All that aside. Choice About Uncircu- lated. The most visible vertical fold is nearly a bend. If there are other folds, searching is required. The paper body is rigid and the margins are mostly ample with the exception of a tightness at the upper right. Another lovely example. (SEE COLOR PLATE) EXTREMELY ATTRACTIVE GREEN SEAL ONE DOLLAR NOTE Lot No. 4520 4520 Georgia. 1776. One Spanish

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 10

    Highlight: Quarter Spanish Milled Dollar. No. 1916. Border variety (b). Signed by Andrew, Evans and Wade. A superbly printed and vivid example. Choice About Uncirculated. Very light vertical fold and some corner handling. Complete margins with full sheet width at the left. A tiny ink burn hole at the “9” of the serial. However, as superb as we have ever seen. Not as popular as the color seal notes. However, in this lofty state, this is an excellent find. Magnifi- cent for the type and yet another note worthy of shattering Newman catalogue value. (SEE COLOR PLATE) Lot No. 4530 a % Georgia. 1776. No. 'J'HIS Certificate intitles the^ j Bearer to One Half of a Spanish 1 .Milled Dollar, or the Value thereof, •according to Resolution of Congress. ■yk iw-o ill XJsCCsdf® &DOLLJRMI 1

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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    John J. Ford, Jr. Collection of Coins, Medals and Currency, Part 10

    Highlight: [N 0 * 32 / J % T HISCaRTlPtGjATfi intitles the Bearer ^ to receive Two Spanish Milled 4 * Dollars, or theValue thereof in Gold or Sil- J ver, according to Refolution ofC«n*GM }|» J DOLLARS.^* Lot No. 4535 4535 Georgia. 1776 Gold Option. Two Spanish Milled Dollars. No. 321. Flag, Drum, Sword and Gun. Signed by Rae, Wereat, Goodgoin, O’Bryen and Ewen. A classic type on all Colonial currency of the Revolutionary period with the flag and weapons motif. An important type for a collection of Georgia colonial notes. The larger size of the note generally subjects it to harsher folding than the smaller notes on other series. Choice Very Fine. Quarter folded noticeably from the back, the vertical is rather sharp, but with no surface breaks of the paper. The color and embossing are sharp still and

    A topical index to the John J. Ford, Jr. series of auction catalogs (2003-2013) is at:

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